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#122
I am having trouble understanding what constitutes anchoring.

When I pick, the tips my ring finger and little finger rest very lightly on my guitar. If I lift them up so they are straight or curl them towards my palm I can still pick unhindered using exactly the same motion. The only reason I leave them resting on the guitar is because this leaves my hand in a relaxed position which requires no concious effort to maintain. If i sweep pick or skip strings, the very end of my little finger remains in contact with the guitar but it is not fixed to any one point, just brushing the surface. My thumb mutes during picking and sweeping, my palm during rhythm and both during tapping. Do I play anchored or not?
http://ilikeshred.dmusic.com

Originally posted by blink_x41
d0oDd, gUrLs d0Nt lIk3 bOiS, gUrLs lIk3 cArS aNd m0N3y$$!!!!!!!11111L0L!!!!11111º1"·ª!"hArDc0r3
#123
Oh god! I'm glad I didn't see this thread earlier.

I'm convinced arguing with anyone who promotes anchoring, or says its only a
preference, or says "Player X does it" is like arguing with your shoe.

They just don't get it.

It's NOT about palm muting or any other technique. It's NOT about copying someone
else's playing. It's NOT about comfortable. It's NOT about preference.

It IS about practice, learning and acquiring better control and accuracy of the
pick using your arm.

When you HAVE to keep your hand on the guitar to steady it for intricate picking
you're using anchoring as a crutch. Your speed suffers, your fluidity suffers.
Relaxation suffers.

The way to get the control is PRACTICE without anchoring and get GOOD at it.
It's harder. Lazy people don't like harder. But it will pay out with results.

When you're PLAYING. It doesn't matter. Stand on your head if you want. Glue
your hand to the guitar. Whatever you feel and what the music calls for is all that
matters. When you need to call on a nice fluid speed run across strings, your
practice without anchoring will be put to good use whether you realize it or not.

EDIT: Oh, one more thing. The wrongest statement I've ever seen is "Play however
is comfortable. That's what's right." Settling into comfort is the fast path to
mediocrity. You progress by pushing your boundaries. Taking something that is
initially uncomfortable and hard and making it comfortable is the path to progress.
Good players make it look easy and comfortable, because it is. To THEM. They
worked to make it so. If you tried the same things, you'd probably find it very
definitely UNcomfortable.
Last edited by edg at Apr 12, 2006,
#124
Quote by Freepower
You still havent given us one reason why we should anchor. Try me.


I really don't care if you anchor or not
#125
^ i really care if you do, and many other people - i make it my business to know as much about guitar as possible so i can A) help myself, and B) help others. Im perfectly open to suggestions so i can add provisions to my current view on anchoring. I'd like to hear them for purposes other than argument - why anchor?
#126
well its a reference point for your hand so you know where it is. this allows you to feel where the strings are at in relation to your pick better. when I anchor its just my palm lightly laying on the bridge/lower strings.
#127
Quote by scheck006
well its a reference point for your hand so you know where it is. this allows you to feel where the strings are at in relation to your pick better.

Translation:

Quote by scheck006
it's a crutch


And that's all that it is. A practiced player will not need a "reference point" to know where their own hand in relation to their strings is. An anchor simply acts as an easy way out for a lazy musican.

In fact, when you don't anchor, there is just one less point of interference to obstruct your playing.

E.g.

Anchor: (1) Upper Arm---> (2) Lower Arm---> (3) Wrist---> (4) Body of Guitar---> (5) Pick---> (6) Strings

Non-anchor: (1) Upper Arm---> (2) Lower Arm---> (3) Wrist---> (4) Pick---> (5) Strings

Tension... GONE!
#128
just because it helps doesn't mean its a crutch??? you use a crutch when you can't do something otherwise.
#130
Quote by Zamboni
But you can do it otherwise. The reason you won't is simply because you're lazy and stubborn.


You're just really pushing the point too much now . I really don't think people are being lazy or stubborn, it's more of a comfort thing, it's just human instinct.
My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
#132
I love opinions.

My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
#133
Quote by Jarrott
it's more of a comfort thing

A.K.A. laziness.

I could do alot of things because it's the comfortable thing to do. That doesn't mean it's the right way to do it.

And I was really only refferring to scheck for that comment, as he seems to be the most adamently opposed to non-anchoring for whatever reason.

Most people on here are open to suggestions and realize the benefits of not anchoring, which is nice to see. I've received a couple PM's regarding this subject asking for my help and opinions, and I'm glad to help any way that I can.
#134
^
Like wise, I love opinions, and I love open-mindedness:

Though I am on your side, I still disagree it's laziness. I know a lot of people who are in the learning stage of not anchoring, it's really not the easiest thing to get adjusted to, it takes time. When I first started learning guitar I didn't anchor. It took me longer then most of my friends to learn how to play, but now I own them at guitar [in speed & accuracy] due to my great dedication.

Then again, maybe a lot of people are just plain lazy, stubborn fools .
My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
Last edited by Jarrott at Apr 13, 2006,
#135
Yeah, comfort really has no place for anyone who's serious about making progress.
(I'm not talking about physical comfort and relaxation which is critical).

If you're really happy with the way you're currently picking and you feel like you
can play everything you want to play, anchoring or not, then there's no reason
why you should change.

On the other hand, you may feel like you've hit a wall and the way you're currently
picking is not getting you anywhere no matter what you do. At that point, you
should really take an honest look at what you're doing, and be willing to try
something completely different even though it may feel like starting over from
scratch.
#136
Quote by edg
Yeah, comfort really has no place for anyone who's serious about making progress..


I've never been on UG to argue with people or tell someone that they're wrong... but that statement pisses me right off. How can you even tell me that I'm not serious about making just based off that one statement I made?
My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
#137
Quote by Jarrott
I've never been on UG to argue with people or tell someone that they're wrong... but that statement pisses me right off. How can you even tell me that I'm not serious about making just based off that one statement I made?

He's not necessarily refferring to you. He's just making a statement, and he's completely right.
#138
Quote by Zamboni
He's not necessarily refferring to you. He's just making a statement, and he's completely right.


And who else would he be referring to ?

That's great that you think he's right, coming from the guy that's "open-minded" . Say what you will though, really. I stand by how I play guitar and I play guitar quite dandy, so I've got nothing to complain about .

To go back on-topic, when it comes down to anchoring, it's a matter of opinion as this thread obviously displays. A lot of people anchor to give themselves stability and never get used to playing without using this technique, so it's just natural to them. Does it make you a bad guitarist? No. Look at theory for example. It's not necessary to learn, though in the end it will help you -- just like non-anchoring will make you play faster .
My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
#139
Quote by Zamboni
A.K.A. laziness.


And I was really only refferring to scheck for that comment, as he seems to be the most adamently opposed to non-anchoring for whatever reason.


when I have I ever said It was wrong to not anchor? when have I ever said I was opposed to it?
#141
What is the main issue of anchoring? To play at high speed across strings or to tremolo pick at one string?.
#142
Quote by edg
Yeah, comfort really has no place for anyone who's serious about making progress.
(I'm not talking about physical comfort and relaxation which is critical).


That's bashing a belief I have. So yeah, it does still refer to me. Just because you don't direct your words towards me doesn't mean it doesn't count .
My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
#144
^ you choose to take it personally, so they're refering to you?

Er...

Anyway, he's right. If you're comfortable with what you're doing, you wont improve. You wanna pick faster? Then you're going to have to change something. Thats what he means by not being comfortable.

Believe it or not, 0 change = 0 improvement.

Whether thats as simple as developing more muscle or as complex as learning strict inside picking.
#145
But it's just... it's anchoring, like come on. "Not serious about improvement", I really do think that's taking it too far, and that's the point I was getting to. If I was blantantly denying that theory helps develop skill, then yeah, he could state a comment like that and I wouldn't of been bothered by it.

It just offended me, 'tis all .
My gear:
'96 Ibanez S540FMTT
'91 Standard Gibson SG [w/ Bare Knuckle Warpigs]
Peavey Triple XXX 112
#146
why is it so hard not to anchor? i was anchoring till the point where i read this thread and it took me like 2 goes to playing fluently without anchoring..
#147
I need the help of some non anchoring people/purist like Freepower and Zam and etc...

If I rest the middle of my forearm on the guitar but the rest of my arm is floating, is this considered anchoring?

thanks
#148
I wouldn't consider the forearm resting on the guitar anchoring. That still allows
the range of motion of your hand. Without some support for your arm, your
shoulder will more easily rise and tense up which isn't a good thing. But, its not
a bad idea to practice it as long as you can keep your shoulder relaxed.
#149
Quote by Unledded
I need the help of some non anchoring people/purist like Freepower and Zam and etc...

If I rest the middle of my forearm on the guitar but the rest of my arm is floating, is this considered anchoring?

thanks


Rest it against the guitar? No.

Press it against the guitar? Yes.
#151
I let my pinky and sometimes ring finger rest around the pickupring. the pinky edge of my hand rests on the bridge lightly for a bit of palm muting. Personally I've tried not anchouring at all, and It didn't help me at all. Made me less acurate and slowed down my picking speed. In my opinion Anchoring is just better and I don't see any downside to it.

All this increase tension stuff just seems totally retarded. how can holding your hand above the guitar have less tension that resting it on it? Hold your hand up in the air, tension yes? now hold it up again, but this time support it on something. Not as much tension now is there?

As for speed...MAB anchors with his pinky, middle and ring fingers. Don't believe me watch His DVD Speed Kills. And he is the fasted guitar player I've heard bear in mind I don't listen to much shred. Shawn lane might be faster, I havne't heard him, but powerfreak talks about him alot.

So...there is my 2 cents on the subject.
#153
Anchored or not, how many of us can play 19nps? And realistically, no, my fingers are not about to detach themselves from my hand.

To me the only way you could create 'tension' is to actually make an effort to press onto the guitar. I'd call that creating tension, as opposed to resting any part of the hand on the guitar. If I rest my hand on a table am I creating tension?

How can people just make snap judgements and proclaim 'you're creating tension'/'you're doing it wrong' etc., never having seen/experienced all the different picking styles everyone is using?
http://ilikeshred.dmusic.com

Originally posted by blink_x41
d0oDd, gUrLs d0Nt lIk3 bOiS, gUrLs lIk3 cArS aNd m0N3y$$!!!!!!!11111L0L!!!!11111º1"·ª!"hArDc0r3
#154
Quote by wynter
To me the only way you could create 'tension' is to actually make an effort to press onto the guitar.


The thing about tension is that you become acclimized to it and for the most part
you don't even realize you have any (think someone concentrating real hard and
thier face gets all screwed up). Generally it builds and spreads the faster you
try and play, but probably even just playing some things slowly will cause a lot
of it. It happens to pretty much everyone.

If you don't make a concsious effort to be aware of it, you'll probably miss it and it
can be sympathetic tension from your fingers to anywhere in your body.

Personally I believe finding and reducing tension is major factor in playing better.
If you don't, then I guess don't bother with it.
#155
Quote by wynter
Anchored or not, how many of us can play 19nps? And realistically, no, my fingers are not about to detach themselves from my hand.

To me the only way you could create 'tension' is to actually make an effort to press onto the guitar. I'd call that creating tension, as opposed to resting any part of the hand on the guitar. If I rest my hand on a table am I creating tension?

How can people just make snap judgements and proclaim 'you're creating tension'/'you're doing it wrong' etc., never having seen/experienced all the different picking styles everyone is using?


the real answer to that question is that you should try to get good at all the different ways, because they all have advantages/disadvantages. none of them are wrong or right.
#158
Quote by Zamboni
You just keep thinkin' that...


That is staggeringly narrow minded.
http://ilikeshred.dmusic.com

Originally posted by blink_x41
d0oDd, gUrLs d0Nt lIk3 bOiS, gUrLs lIk3 cArS aNd m0N3y$$!!!!!!!11111L0L!!!!11111º1"·ª!"hArDc0r3
#159
This thread is turning into people arguing over each others mindsets. It's not about anchoring anymore.

Halfway through this thread someone asked what the "right people" mean by anchoring. The reply was if you press a part of your body against the guitar and create tension. In this case halkf the people that do anchor will be alright and not have any problems. The other half will want to experiemnt to make sure that they don't have any tension at all.

I tried the resting the pinky on the guitar before and it created tension and slowed down my playing - I also tried it last night and I was playing without any problems, all I did was make sure that I was relaxed.
#160
Quote by wynter
That is staggeringly narrow minded.



And that was staggeringly retarded.

There is the way that works, and the way that works better. Unanchored being the better.