#2
The term "heavy metal"

Cover from Led Zeppelin. The album greatly influenced many heavy metal musiciansThe origin of the term heavy metal in relation to a form of music is uncertain. The term had been used for centuries in chemistry and metallurgy and is listed as such in the Oxford English Dictionary. An early use of the term in modern popular culture was by counter-culture writer William S. Burroughs. In his 1962 novel, The Soft Machine, he introduces the character "Uranian Willy, the Heavy Metal Kid". His next novel in 1964, Nova Express, develops this theme further, heavy metal being a metaphor for addictive drugs.

"With their diseases and orgasm drugs and their sexless parasite life forms ? Heavy Metal People of Uranus wrapped in cool blue mist of vaporized bank notes ? And the Insect People of Minraud with metal music"

Burroughs, William S, (1964). Nova Express. New York: Grove Press. p. 112
Given the publication dates of these works it is unlikely that Burroughs had any intent to relate the term to rock music; however, Burroughs' writing may have influenced later usage of the term.

The first use of the term "heavy metal" in a song lyric is the words "heavy metal thunder" in the 1968 Steppenwolf song "Born to be Wild" (Walser 1993, p. 8):

"I like smoke and lightning
Heavy metal thunder
Racin' with the wind
And the feelin' that I'm under"

The book, "The History of Heavy Metal," states the name as a take from "hippiespeak," heavy meaning anything with a potent mood, and metal, more specifically designating what the mood would be, grinding and weighted as metal. The word "heavy" (meaning serious or profound) had entered beatnik/counterculture slang some time earlier and references to "heavy music"?typically slower, more amplified variations of standard pop fare?were already common; indeed, Iron Butterfly first started playing Los Angeles in 1967, their name explained on an album cover, "Iron- symbolic of something heavy as in sound, Butterfly- light, appealing and versatile...an object that can be used freely in the imagination". Iron Butterfly's 1968 debut album was entitled Heavy. The fact that Led Zeppelin (whose moniker came partly in reference to Keith Moon's jest that they would "go down like a lead balloon") incorporated a heavy metal into its name may have sealed the usage of the term.

In the late 1960s, Birmingham, England was still a centre of industry and (given the many rock bands that evolved in and around the city, such as Led Zeppelin, The Move, and Black Sabbath), some people suggest that the term Heavy Metal may have some relation to such activity. Biographies of The Move have claimed that the sound came from their 'heavy' guitar riffs that were popular amongst the 'metal midlands'.

Sandy Pearlman, original producer, manager and songwriter for Blue Öyster Cult, claims to have been the first person to apply the term "heavy metal" to rock music in 1970.

A widespread but disputed hypothesis about the origin of the genre was brought forth by "Chas" Chandler, who was a manager of the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1969, in an interview on the PBS TV programme "Rock and Roll" in 1995. He states that "...it [heavy metal] was a term originated in a New York Times article reviewing a Jimi Hendrix performance," and claims the author described the Jimi Hendrix Experience "...like listening to heavy metal falling from the sky." The precise source of this claim, however, has not been found and its accuracy is disputed.

The first well-documented usage of the term "heavy metal" referring to a style of music, appears to be the May 1971 issue of Creem, in a review of Sir Lord Baltimore's Kingdom Come. In this review we are told that "Sir Lord Baltimore seems to have down pat most all the best heavy metal tricks in the book". Creem critics David Marsh and Lester Bangs would subsequently use the term frequently in their writings in regards to bands such as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath.

Heavy metal may have been used as a jibe initially by a number of music critics but was quickly adopted by its adherents. Other, already-established bands, such as Deep Purple, who had origins in pop or progressive rock, immediately took on the heavy metal mantle, adding distortion and additional amplification in a more aggressive approach.



From Wiki.
#3
The first use of the term "heavy metal" in a song lyric is the words "heavy metal thunder" in the 1968 Steppenwolf song "Born to be Wild" (Walser 1993, p. 8):

"I like smoke and lightning
Heavy metal thunder
Racin' with the wind
And the feelin' that I'm under"

The book, "The History of Heavy Metal," states the name as a take from "hippiespeak," heavy meaning anything with a potent mood, and metal, more specifically designating what the mood would be, grinding and weighted as metal. The word "heavy" (meaning serious or profound) had entered beatnik/counterculture slang some time earlier and references to "heavy music"?typically slower, more amplified variations of standard pop fare?were already common; indeed, Iron Butterfly first started playing Los Angeles in 1967, their name explained on an album cover, "Iron- symbolic of something heavy as in sound, Butterfly- light, appealing and versatile...an object that can be used freely in the imagination". Iron Butterfly's 1968 debut album was entitled Heavy. The fact that Led Zeppelin (whose moniker came partly in reference to Keith Moon's jest that they would "go down like a lead balloon") incorporated a heavy metal into its name may have sealed the usage of the term.

In the late 1960s, Birmingham, England was still a centre of industry and (given the many rock bands that evolved in and around the city, such as Led Zeppelin, The Move, and Black Sabbath), some people suggest that the term Heavy Metal may have some relation to such activity. Biographies of The Move have claimed that the sound came from their 'heavy' guitar riffs that were popular amongst the 'metal midlands'.

Sandy Pearlman, original producer, manager and songwriter for Blue Öyster Cult, claims to have been the first person to apply the term "heavy metal" to rock music in 1970.

A widespread but disputed hypothesis about the origin of the genre was brought forth by "Chas" Chandler, who was a manager of the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1969, in an interview on the PBS TV programme "Rock and Roll" in 1995. He states that "...it [heavy metal] was a term originated in a New York Times article reviewing a Jimi Hendrix performance," and claims the author described the Jimi Hendrix Experience "...like listening to heavy metal falling from the sky." The precise source of this claim, however, has not been found and its accuracy is disputed.

The first well-documented usage of the term "heavy metal" referring to a style of music, appears to be the May 1971 issue of Creem, in a review of Sir Lord Baltimore's Kingdom Come. In this review we are told that "Sir Lord Baltimore seems to have down pat most all the best heavy metal tricks in the book". Creem critics David Marsh and Lester Bangs would subsequently use the term frequently in their writings in regards to bands such as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath.

Heavy metal may have been used as a jibe initially by a number of music critics but was quickly adopted by its adherents. Other, already-established bands, such as Deep Purple, who had origins in pop or progressive rock, immediately took on the heavy metal mantle, adding distortion and additional amplification in a more aggressive approach.

Wikipedia is your friend, I guess.

VINDICEDIT:

Damn you.
#6
Sandy Pearlman, original producer, manager and songwriter for Blue Öyster Cult, claims to have been the first person to apply the term "heavy metal" to rock music in 1970.


I always wondered if they were the first to use that term. Blue Oyster Cult Pwnz.
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#8
Where exactly do you draw the line between hard rock and metal? Wouldn't it be accurate to be able to describe both as heavily reliant on "big" guitar riffs, distortion, and solos?
#9
Metals faster, usually harsh or soaring vocals compared to standard rock vocals. Just....a metal feel in general. Less chuggachugga.
Dead soldier! Go now to Valhalla!
#10
Isn't Black Sabbath the prototypical metal band? Their songs weren't necessarily fast unless they were mainly only influential to sludge metal and desert rock bands. I'll be the first to admit that I'm a metal noob on a budget so I have to decide which albums I want more and so far the albums by all the "big" metal bands haven't made it onto my list.
#12
Quote by Dotpunker89
Well it all started millions of years ago.


I want the rest of the story....
Talk to Erowid

Quote by dead-fish

Tell me when thy band shall return to mark a schedueled performance on my nearest venue's door!
Quoth teh Loomis, "Nevermore".



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#14
The universe started when a singularity of all matter expanded. Superstrings attracted to each other and formed quarks. Quarks coalesced and formed protons. Protons and electrons formed neutrons. Protons, neutrons, and electrons formed hydrogen. Hydrogen clouds gathered and under its gravity formed massive bodies. As the bodies grew to enormous size to internal pressure caused hydrogen nuclei at the core to bounce into other hydrogen increasing temperature tremendously. At high enough pressure and temperature it begins to fuse into deuterium. This releases high energy particles. The galactic body now radiates. As more hydrogen gathers and pressures and temperature increase dramatically hydrogen begins to fuse into helium, which releases a large number of higher energy protons and electrons.

There are now a few things that can happen. The star can continue to gather hydrogen, either from accreting from a companion star, or attracting hydrogen clouds. If this continues the star will reach a point of energy output that exceeds its capacity. If you have ever used a firecracker you should know what happens when energy output exceeds the packaging?s ability to let it out gently. It explodes.

The other option is if the star stops growing, gets old and all the hydrogen fuses into helium. Density goes up, as do temperatures, and again energy output exceeds capacity. Both of these are supernova, and they release an immeasurable amount of energy. We detect gamma radiation bursts as far away as other galaxies from such supernova.

When these occur many things can happen to the core. The outer layer usually forms planets and, more immediately, a nebula. The middle layers and core are pressurized to billions of degrees, which causes fusion beyond helium. This is the formation of metals. Iron is the most common limit to a first generation star. This can become the core of a second generation star, and some can fly outward and form planets, moons, and asteroids. Neutron stars, quark stars, and singularities are also occasionally produced at the core of a large enough supernova.

Second generation stars, formed when the helium and hydrogen again coalesce can go through this same process. When they go nova the iron core can be again heated to billions of degrees, causing heavier metals such as gold, plutonium and uranium, just to name a few. See a periodic table for a full list.
101010101010001010101
#15
Metal, stereotypically, is harder and heavier than rock.

This is same with the materials. Metals, in general, are harder and heavier than rocks.
#16
u al r pretee stupid kos green dai nventd metal u idiotz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
#18
Quote by DUP3R
u al r pretee stupid kos green dai nventd metal u idiotz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


iether you're being ironic(right context?) or actually serious

if the former:
if the latter:

everyone has made valid points here.
#20
Quote by Danno13
Danno's opinion:

Metal is harder than rock.

Harder...do you mean it is more difficult or is that a description of its sound?
#21
Quote by las7
The universe started when a singularity of all matter expanded. Superstrings attracted to each other and formed quarks. Quarks coalesced and formed protons. Protons and electrons formed neutrons. Protons, neutrons, and electrons formed hydrogen. Hydrogen clouds gathered and under its gravity formed massive bodies. As the bodies grew to enormous size to internal pressure caused hydrogen nuclei at the core to bounce into other hydrogen increasing temperature tremendously. At high enough pressure and temperature it begins to fuse into deuterium. This releases high energy particles. The galactic body now radiates. As more hydrogen gathers and pressures and temperature increase dramatically hydrogen begins to fuse into helium, which releases a large number of higher energy protons and electrons.

There are now a few things that can happen. The star can continue to gather hydrogen, either from accreting from a companion star, or attracting hydrogen clouds. If this continues the star will reach a point of energy output that exceeds its capacity. If you have ever used a firecracker you should know what happens when energy output exceeds the packaging?s ability to let it out gently. It explodes.

The other option is if the star stops growing, gets old and all the hydrogen fuses into helium. Density goes up, as do temperatures, and again energy output exceeds capacity. Both of these are supernova, and they release an immeasurable amount of energy. We detect gamma radiation bursts as far away as other galaxies from such supernova.

When these occur many things can happen to the core. The outer layer usually forms planets and, more immediately, a nebula. The middle layers and core are pressurized to billions of degrees, which causes fusion beyond helium. This is the formation of metals. Iron is the most common limit to a first generation star. This can become the core of a second generation star, and some can fly outward and form planets, moons, and asteroids. Neutron stars, quark stars, and singularities are also occasionally produced at the core of a large enough supernova.

Second generation stars, formed when the helium and hydrogen again coalesce can go through this same process. When they go nova the iron core can be again heated to billions of degrees, causing heavier metals such as gold, plutonium and uranium, just to name a few. See a periodic table for a full list.


hahahahaha
#22
Quote by cadmium_blimp
Isn't Black Sabbath the prototypical metal band? Their songs weren't necessarily fast unless they were mainly only influential to sludge metal and desert rock bands. I'll be the first to admit that I'm a metal noob on a budget so I have to decide which albums I want more and so far the albums by all the "big" metal bands haven't made it onto my list.


They influenced a whole genre of metal: Doom. They are the original doom band, and while doom isn't fast as lightning, it's still metal. Check some out.
#23
Metal was formed when someone discoevered that he can make the electric guitar sound more crunchier. And than playing powerdchords with percuission rythm and then they just added some solos. Then followers started experimenting and made it more difficult. That BS. Sorry.

Ok Metal is deriavted form classical music.
#24
I compare Death metal to Stainless Steel, with it's Carbon and Chromium counterparts... [/Ex-Materials Tech Geek]
O.K.

“There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
~ Bill Watterson


O__o
#25
Quote by cadmium_blimp
Harder...do you mean it is more difficult or is that a description of its sound?


Both, i suppose.
#26
Quote by Nelsean
I always wondered if they were the first to use that term. Blue Oyster Cult Pwnz.

Don't fear the reaper!