#1
ok how should i prepare for trying out guitars? I remember last time i went....i got so nervous(i have all kinds of public fears)...all i did was strum the open strings and play a few power chords. What should i play there to really try it out well? Keep in mind that i really dont play well at all...

EDIT: let me just say that when i say i play bad it doesnt mean i dont know how to play...its just sloppy..just saying this cause some people seem to think im completely beginner.
My old sig sucked
Last edited by lsatrarcyy at May 5, 2006,
#2
if you don't play well then maybe you should be practicing more instead of looking into buying a new guitar.
#3
Quote by vantage4
if you don't play well then maybe you should be practicing more instead of looking into buying a new guitar.

There you go... thats yer answer.. just practice until yer actually good enough to be buying more guitars... if you have something that makes noise, you can just learn on that untill you actually know enough to get more stuff
#4
im getting a new one cause my old one doesnt work well.....but it doesnt really matter because i do believe that if i wanted to get a new guitar i should be able to.
My old sig sucked
#5
Quote by lsatrarcyy
im getting a new one cause my old one doesnt work well.....but it doesnt really matter because i do believe that if i wanted to get a new guitar i should be able to.

I agree with you. Guitars are a commodity to be consumed just like anything else, not some goal to be achieved or what have you. If you suck, oh well. When you're trying something out, just play. If you can only play a couple chords or handful of songs, then make sure that guitar is the one that sounds the best to you playing those chords and songs. That's all. Everyone sucked once.
Hi, I'm Peter
#6
Quote by Dirk Gently
I agree with you. Guitars are a commodity to be consumed just like anything else, not some goal to be achieved or what have you. If you suck, oh well. When you're trying something out, just play. If you can only play a couple chords or handful of songs, then make sure that guitar is the one that sounds the best to you playing those chords and songs. That's all. Everyone sucked once.

thank you. Also should i play scales? And to test if the neck feels ok should i just play different things all around the neck?
My old sig sucked
#7
Play open A and E chords, you can tell a lot about a guitar by playing those. Also check your action and most importantly try it out in a amp like yours, that way you won't be disappointed by it's tone when you take it home. Another word of advice is that if you think you'll stick with guitar save up and buy a nice one, you don't want to buy a cheap one and end up replacing it later on.
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#8
a guitar doesnt sound any better weither you thrash out some mad shredding or some basic chords, just make sure u like the feel and sound of the guitar. If all youre going to play on said guitar is power chords and easy riffs, then play them. But also make sure you check other things out aswell, things like looking for dings on the body, fret buzz on all frets and strings, check the electronics, it it a smooth transition when you flick the pickup selector or is there some crackling? But most of all just try and relax, i know when i went to try out my new amp i was scared ****less that i would play badly and people would laugh at me, but the fact is that youre out there doing something that you love, anyone that laughs at you for that should get a life!
#9
just strum chords nothing hard just check the feel.
Quote by thefoldarsoldar
10
you sir, are funny as hell.



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#10
get a hat with a brim, and tilt your head down. its almost as if everyone disappears.
#11
Quote by vantage4
if you don't play well then maybe you should be practicing more instead of looking into buying a new guitar.

he never said he was gonna buy anything, maybe he wanted a feel for new types of guitars first


ok i guess he did but he does have a point, its not a goal its just another thing to buy, if he wants to play damn it by blink 182 on a multi thousand dollar gibson or high end fender, let him its his money, not yours
Last edited by Air Guitarist! at May 5, 2006,
#12
^ wow...actually thats exactly what im doing....trying out some guitars tomorrow..ur good....

EDIT: i take that back. you seem to have some issues.
My old sig sucked
Last edited by lsatrarcyy at May 5, 2006,
#13
Quote by lsatrarcyy
^ wow...actually thats exactly what im doing....trying out some guitars tomorrow..ur good....
yeah i just edited it, sorry i only read the first two or three post....


*edit* yeah another one, if your apperantly not a guy, let me reccomend daisy rock, the wangcaster or the wang bass, and the squier hello kitty guitar
#14
Quote by Air Guitarist!
yeah i just edited it, sorry i only read the first two or three post....


*edit* yeah another one, if your apperantly not a guy, let me reccomend daisy rock, the wangcaster or the wang bass, and the squier hello kitty guitar

That's outrageously sexist... ANYWAY...

Yeah, I recommend you play scales when you try out a guitar. Play what you'll be playing on it. And it's good to move scales around the neck (if you know some movable ones). Get up around the 12th fret and beyond. It's a good way to see if the frets are finished well. If they're not, you'll get buzzing and "bottoming out"
Hi, I'm Peter
#15
That's stereotypical and wrong.

I'm a guy, and I love the Hello Kitty strat, and I think Daisy Rock has some damn fine guitars.


The main thing for me is...

Take a friend who plays better than you.
Learn at least one scale, and practice it until you've pretty much got it on your old guitar, and then try it during the practice.
If you have an amp at home, ask to try the guitar in the same kind of amp. A lot of guitars will sound incredible on a top-of-the-line amp, but need that kind of support to get a great sound.
Don't ask the salesman to play for you.
Do play your scale/riff/whatever.
Then ask your friend to play.
Even if you love the guitar, act as though you were only slightly impressed.
Don't buy the first guitar you try. A lot of places won't mind if you go there a bunch of times to try guitars, so long as you're sociable, modest, and not awfully bad.
Wear comfortable clothes, and nothing with buttons or toggles or buckles that could scratch the finish, without at least one layer covering them.
Carry the picks you're comfortable with.
Try a wide variety.
If you're asked how much you want to spend, be vague. Tell them that you have a sound you want, and you'll pay whatever it takes to achieve that sound.
On this forum, you'll hear a lot of talk about websites, about brands being awful or brands being incredible; you and your friend are the best judges of what is incredible and what is awful: for instance, a friend of mine loves Ibanez... Whereas I am not a big fan, simply because the Ibanez' I tried tended towards... One dimensionality.
Notice brand names, but don't get stuck on them. You know what you want, don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
Buying second hand is an option, but you're buying problems too.

As for the actual trying;

1. hold the guitar. Is it a comfortable weight? Look down the fretboard, to make sure it's straight. Flick all the switches and turn the knobs to feel how easily they move.
2. sit down the guitar in a position you're most comfortable with. If you're trying unorthodox shapes, take your own strap. Unplugged, pluck each string and listen for fret buzz.
3. Plug in the guitar. Pluck each string, and try the pickup selector switch, etc.
4. Play your chord/riff/etc. Play it two or three times.
5. Ask your friend how it sounded.
6. Have your friend try the guitar also.
7. Don't let the salesman tell you about the guitar yet.
8. If you're impressed, have them put the guitar away, go away, and have a stiff drink. Talk to your friend over the drink, and listen carefully for any negative statements while you're away from the shop.
9. Try a lot of guitars, in a lot of places. If you feel as though you're getting closer to what you want, ask for another guitar the same as the one you've tried.
10. Try everything. Try guitars that are well beyond your budget as well, just for the experience of playing them. Don't be afraid to try a guitar completely unlike one you had in mind. Don't be afraid to quibble over color, finish, or shape. Do not be afraid to walk out of the shop empty handed for at least two weeks.

Most of all, try to have fun with each guitar. If you're a beginner, think about the tones you want, and about the guitars that make them... Work from there out, don't be constrained by those select few.

Another word of advice I'd give is to try and avoid guitars with no brand at all, or a brand you've never heard of - if you're unsure, try searching online.

Talk to your guitar shop staff. They're usually decent folks, but don't let them try to bully you into trying things. If you feel really guilty, buy picks.
#16
^Daisy Rock has a sweet looking Les Paul Junior copy I've been looking for everywhere. I'm dying to try one out.

As for trying guitars out, to the threadstarter, just play as best you can, take your time, and play the way you would when you're practicing. Try to play a variety of genres to see how versitile the guitar is. Most importantly, if a salesman ever rushes you or comments on your ability negitively, leave and go somewhere else.