#1
I know most of you are gonna say it sounds just like noise..and i pretty much agree with you, still i'd like to practice some shred for some diversity. From videos of people shredding i've watched, it seems like all they're doing is ascending and descending scales with a lot of effects. (i'm talking about amateurs, not steve vai or malmsteen) Is this true? Does anyone have any tips for shredding? Like, what scales to use, etc.

thanks in advance
#3
Play incredibly fast. Without sacrificing theory and technique. And yeah, lots of it ends up going up and down and modulating and stuff.
#4
I think you may have a little too narrow view of the term "shred". I consider shred very techincal usually instrumental guitar music. Most don't stick to one specific scale, but some have favorites that they tend to use and give them a signature sound, (ie. Yngwie Malmsteen and his frequent use of Diminished and Harmonic Minor scales). Ofthen they aren't just using 7 note scales; Dimebag, Zakk Wylde, and Alex Lahio often use scales based off minor pentatonic boxes but maybe with some extra notes in them. Also it isn't always just really fast alternate picking. Too often it is just repetitive use of apeggios that are being sweep picked (aka economy picking). Other popular techniques are string skipping, ridiculous legato lines, and crazy tapping. Also "shred" (virtuoso instrumental guitar music) is extremely popular in Japan and some of the best shredders are unknown because they are japanese.
#5
well to do very basic shredding, just learn a scale (harmonic minor works well i find) all the way up and down the neck. you dont need to know it all the way up the neck but you should have a decent grasp of it. then alternate pick up and down the scale fast- its kind of like doing legato up and down the scale while tremelo picking it all- (this is probably what you see, and pointed out, in those videos of amateurs 'shredding')

thats the basis for a lot of what shredders do when they go up and down scales, and its not too hard if you practice at it for a little bit. they also sweep pick sometimes but its not a neccesity. tone-wise id say use distortion, then a lot of reverb can make it sound cool; a chorus or slight delay works well too.

thats basicly how i got started shredding, theres a lot more to it but thats the basic form i supose. (to all the experienced shredders out there reading this: if i am wrong about this feel free to contradict me seeing as im not very experienced)

EDIT: and like the guy above me stated, legato can be a huge part in a shredders arsenal (ie zakk wylde.) and tapping is another big one. using natural harmonics, and pinch harmonics, is another thing.
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Last edited by atc228 at May 5, 2006,
#6
Quote by whitebluesboy
I think you may have a little too narrow view of the term "shred". I consider shred very techincal usually instrumental guitar music. Most don't stick to one specific scale, but some have favorites that they tend to use and give them a signature sound, (ie. Yngwie Malmsteen and his frequent use of Diminished and Harmonic Minor scales). Ofthen they aren't just using 7 note scales; Dimebag, Zakk Wylde, and Alex Lahio often use scales based off minor pentatonic boxes but maybe with some extra notes in them. Also it isn't always just really fast alternate picking. Too often it is just repetitive use of apeggios that are being sweep picked (aka economy picking). Other popular techniques are string skipping, ridiculous legato lines, and crazy tapping. Also "shred" (virtuoso instrumental guitar music) is extremely popular in Japan and some of the best shredders are unknown because they are japanese.


To start off, Alexi Laiho isn't a pentatonic ***** like Zakk Wylde. Dimebag...well, he wasn't set on using pentatonics, but he did use a lot of them. Alexi uses a lot of minor, harmonic minor and such.

Secondly...don't be racist. The reason that some of the best shredders in the world are unknown is because they ALL SOUND THE SAME. Not really. But seriously, a fair amount of those Japanese shredders sound exactly the same. No emotion, no feel...just incredible technique. Which mind you, I am totally fine with. But unfortunately for them, the world doesn't like emotionless music. Obviously, not all Japanese shredders are like this. But still?they aren't unknown because they're Japanese. Herman Li is Asian by descent, yet he's rather famous.



EDIT: and like the guy above me stated, legato can be a huge part in a shredders arsenal (ie zakk wylde.) and tapping is another big one. using natural harmonics, and pinch harmonics, is another thing.

Zakk Wylde never uses legato. He's said this many times, in many interviews. I mean just listen to his music?he's an alternate picking man, through and through.

Hey guys! I just started playing electric guitar should I get a Gabson Lay Pall or a Femdor Startokaster. I like the picks on the gabsons but i like how sweet femdors look. Beforre i get a gabson what company makes them?
#8
i'd agree about the effects thing...ive seen players just play random crap using a wah pedal and it sounds like an awesome shred solo...
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#9
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Secondly...don't be racist. The reason that some of the best shredders in the world are unknown is because they ALL SOUND THE SAME. Not really. But seriously, a fair amount of those Japanese shredders sound exactly the same. No emotion, no feel...just incredible technique. Which mind you, I am totally fine with. But unfortunately for them, the world doesn't like emotionless music. Obviously, not all Japanese shredders are like this. But still?they aren't unknown because they're Japanese. Herman Li is Asian by descent, yet he's rather famous.

He's not being racist mate, hes commenting on how the music industry and general public are biased against non western-cultured music, such as Japanese.
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#10
From the clips I've seen of shredders talking about their technique, they say to start off using scale fragments. So you take, say, four notes and learn to play them very fast. Then you link those first four notes with another four or six notes, and so on.