#1
I need to replace a broken capacitors on a Gibson SG. What type of capacitor do I use? The one I found on a guitar eletronic site is a .02 mfd. I found one in radio shack... a .022 µF Whats difference or am I just completly dumb. Please shed some light. The connection is from the volume to tone knobs.
#2
uF and MFD are the same, so a .022 will work fine, I reccomend film.
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#5
Quote by JDawg
Ok thank you very much guys. The capacitor I got is slightly smaller then the other one, does that make a difference?

smaller capacitance reading or smaller in dimensions? capacitance matters more, but both matter
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Quote by utsapp89
Volume=Emotion.
#6
The capictor is broken = your tone control doesnt work

if you replace it with to small or too large of a value it'll work just very wierdly (won't do anything or will do WAY too much)
#7
From Kinman Tone Workshop:

"The value of the tone capacitor will determine how much brightness/presence will be cut by the tone pot.

The higher the value, the less bright or more muddy the tone will be when the tone control is turned down. The tone capacitor on early Strats was .1mF, this was changed to .047mF in the 1970's. I like a .01mF cap but modern Strats use .022mF.

The voltage rating is not important, however a 630 volt cap has thicker wires that are easier to work with. The common Polyester cap (or Greencap, or Epoxy) works well but some Tone Connoisseurs prefer the old original Waxed paper type.

It should also be understood that the capacitor has an effect even when the pot is set at maximum (10). This is because the 250K resisitance of a pot allows some signal to pass through the cap to ground thus sucking some of the highs.

A 500K pot allows less effect when set to maximum, and a 1 Meg almost no effect at all. Changes in tone will be heard when the cap values are changed, even when the pot is set at maximum (10). Remember the lower the value the brighter the tone, even when set to 10."
#8
Quote by Yerffej
smaller capacitance reading or smaller in dimensions? capacitance matters more, but both matter



Physical size is basically irrelevent inside a guitar.
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I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#9
Err, not a scooby if your problem was cleared up by that snippet posted above, hoever for this who don't know their prefixes:

mfd would be a milli Farad
µF = micro Farad
and MFD would be a mega Farad.
#11
^Well, it does a certain extent actually. Higher voltage caps(ususally bigger) transfer more high frequencies, but its very minor.
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I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#12
Quote by twelvestringtex
uF, and mF or mfd, are not the same, but since the symbol is difficult to type out they have become the same by convention.

yeah, .022 will work just fine.


?

i thought the prefix "u"(not an actual lower case u i know, it's a greek letter i believe) was pronounced "micro", hence the abbreviation "mF" for "mircofarad"? or is this what you were saying basically?
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#13
That_Pink_Queen: oh, alright, didn't know that, thanks!

joyful womble:mF is millifarad

but three symbols are unfortunatel used for microfarad and they are the greek letter "mu", m, and u.

this leads to confusion, becasue microfarad is not the same as millifarad by 1000000 times, but the symbols lazy people use are the same.