#2
i play bass so im not exactly sure but i think 5 if you have 24 frets
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#3
I think its exactly 4 on a 24 fret guitar. From the Low E open string to the 24th fret High E string.
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Last edited by Logz at May 6, 2006,
#4
open low e, 2nd fret d, open high e, 12th fret high e, 24th fret high e, 5
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#5
Quote by OddHeadedPunk89
open low e, 2nd fret d, open high e, 12th fret high e, 24th fret high e, 5


That'd be 4.

From open low E to 2nd fret D is one.

From 2nd fret D to open high E is two.

From open high E to 12th fret high E is three.

From 12th fret high E to 24th fret high E makes a grand total of four.

Thanks to me, you now know how to count.

Dumbass.
#6
sorry, this will mess up the layout.
EDIT to the user above me:
Dickhead


Low E string: E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E
    A string:             A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A
    D string:                         D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D
    G string:                                     G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G
    B string:                                               B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B
High E string                                                           E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E F Gb G Ab A Bb B C Db D Eb E
              |____________________________|__________________________|____________________________|___________________________|
                           1                            2                            3                            4
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Last edited by Logz at May 6, 2006,
#7
Quote by Vindication
That'd be 4.

From open low E to 2nd fret D is one.

From 2nd fret D to open high E is two.

From open high E to 12th fret high E is three.

From 12th fret high E to 24th fret high E makes a grand total of four.

Thanks to me, you now know how to count.

Dumbass.

what are you talking about? do you know what octave means? An octave is a tone that is eight diatonic degrees above or below another given tone. So that means low E is one, 2nd fret on the D string is two, high open e string is three, 12th fret on high e string is four and 24th fret on high e is five. way to be a dick.
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#9
Quote by systemrules
what are you talking about? do you know what octave means? An octave is a tone that is eight diatonic degrees above or below another given tone.


That's right; you need two notes to get one octave, since an octave is an interval. An octave is kinda like measuring the distance between two notes.

So that means low E is one, 2nd fret on the D string is two . . .


No, the first octave is from the low E to the next E one octave away.
Last edited by ban rap at May 6, 2006,
#10
If you're a master of pinch harmonics you might be able to get quiet a lot more range out of the thing (though you'd have to be REALLY good and you still wouldn't be able to do chords)

The only person I could think of that is even close to being able to do that is Mattias IA Elkhund (though I think Steve Vai has done some basic melodies consisting only out of harmonics)
Last edited by seljer at May 6, 2006,
#11
Can't you just, for once, NOT outsmart everybody seljer?
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#12
Quote by frenchyfungus
Can't you just, for once, NOT outsmart everybody seljer?


Well everyone was right too. Around 4 octaves depending on how many frets you have.
#13
When played the octave range on the guitar I tried singing the notes when I counted the octaves. I managed to get all the way down to the low E, though with som struggle on the the lowest E note, and then all the way up to F on the high E string 13th fret. Havent tested my range before so dont know if this is any good.

Im not familiar with the average vocal range of male singers but do anyone of you know how my vocal range stands out in the competition?
#14
On a standard tuned 6 string with 24 frets it's exactly 4 octaves (not including harmonics)
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#15
with harmonics, you can get 5 or 6 if you "screw with the pickups to make more frets" just kidding if you set pickups right you can get really high harmonics you cant normally get.

and with a thimble (look up bumblefoot) you can get 6 or 7 at most, but itd sound awful
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#16
Quote by Falcoe
When played the octave range on the guitar I tried singing the notes when I counted the octaves. I managed to get all the way down to the low E, though with som struggle on the the lowest E note, and then all the way up to F on the high E string 13th fret. Havent tested my range before so dont know if this is any good.

Im not familiar with the average vocal range of male singers but do anyone of you know how my vocal range stands out in the competition?


That would be about my range too, I don't know if it's good or not.
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#18
Quote by DocArunas
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1325404

I counted 5, that is if one single note adds as an extra octave

That just completes the 4th octave.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#19
4 octaves with normal fretted notes on a normal 24 fret six string.

I have 5 on my 8 (low B + low E).

If you're a master of pinch harmonics you might be able to get quiet a lot more range out of the thing (though you'd have to be REALLY good and you still wouldn't be able to do chords)

The only person I could think of that is even close to being able to do that is Mattias IA Elkhund (though I think Steve Vai has done some basic melodies consisting only out of harmonics)


Ah, yes, the interesting stuff!

With slide guitar/pick scratches I can get my "41st" fret, so that's an extra octave and a bit. You can hit the octave harmonic at the 24th fret and get the harmonic there. Sometimes strumming behind the nut/bridge will avail you of particularly high notes, and all of the above can be enhanced with effects.

(and you can seriously do chords in pinch harmonics )
#20
Sorry to bring this up again after so long... but am a total novice and more than a little confused and seaching for an answer stumbled across this thread.

If an octave moves stepwise from one note to its next octave counterpart, then for example, would say the 1st fret bottom E string (F) to the 3rd fret D string (F) be an octave? Therefore the total amount of octaves on a guitar equal the amount of repeated notes (12 F notes = 12 octaves)

I know this is clearly wrong but at the moment this is the only way i can see it and am sure there is logic there which is all the more confusing.....?
#21
Quote by fil-who
Sorry to bring this up again after so long... but am a total novice and more than a little confused and seaching for an answer stumbled across this thread.

If an octave moves stepwise from one note to its next octave counterpart, then for example, would say the 1st fret bottom E string (F) to the 3rd fret D string (F) be an octave? Therefore the total amount of octaves on a guitar equal the amount of repeated notes (12 F notes = 12 octaves)

I know this is clearly wrong but at the moment this is the only way i can see it and am sure there is logic there which is all the more confusing.....?



Not quite, there are several places on the guitar where you can play the same note.

It's easier to understand octaves when you read off standard notation instead of guitar tablature. When you know the range of the guitar and where the lowest and highest notes are written on the stave for your instrument, you'll get your instrument range.

Guitar has 4 octaves range on a 24 fret guitar.

5 notes of E in different octaves, the octave is the gap in between those E's.

To put it in an analogy, I have 5 fingers on one hand but 4 gaps between the 5 fingers.
#23
There is four. For example. Here is a split chord that contains all 4 octaves of E:
e--12
B--X
G--9
D--X
A--7
E--0
There you go.
#24
Quote by kwatne96
There is four. For example. Here is a split chord that contains all 4 octaves of E:
e--12
B--X
G--9
D--X
A--7
E--0
There you go.


don't forget the fifth E on top, on a 24-fret guitar.

this thread is both old and resolved, man.
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