#1
Okay I know this is a powerchord

0
0
0
7
7
5

I play these kinds of chords like this

5
5
5
7
7
5

Is that still a power chord?

and is this a powerchord

7
7
5
5
5
5
#3
bar chord, u take your first finger and bar it over every string then take the power chord and play the bar chord
#4
yea, the first is a powerchord 100%, the second is 100% called a bar chord, and im 75% sure the last one is a barchord too
#5
The first one is a powerchord
the second one is not a powerchord. It is Am - Barre chord
the third one is i think Ammaj11(add 6)
Been away, am back
#6
The first one is not a power chord if you let the last three strings ring. A power chord only contains two notes: the root note and the 5th note (in the respective scale).

X
X
X
7 - A
7 - E
5 - A

If you pluck the 1st and 3rd string from the top they are the same note and the middle one is the 5th note in the A major scale. Power chords are used because if you play full chords like the second one which is Am, they become too busy in distortion with all the high and low notes clashing so it ends up sounding sloppy, where if you play power chords you get the low end crunch that sounds cleaner. And remember since theres no 3rd note being played (just the 1st and the 5th) It's neither minor nor major.

Bry
#7
What Bryan said.
Populus vult decipi. Decipiatur.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
It's can be a contraction and genitive case.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
If you cut down on these costs students won't learn so well, effecting the "quality"...
#8
Wow that really cleared up alot. I pretty much just would play the barre version of
5
5
5
7
7
5

and it's alot easier to just bar instead of playing 3 strings.
#9
Maybe, but it will not sound right when you play it with the song because its Am instead of A5, it's going to have a sad sound to it. Not only that but with distortion is will sound messy as I stated above. If you practice power chords enough they become very simple to play. I put my index on the low E and my pinky and ring finger on the other two then "lay" them so that they mute the other three strings and you have no worry about hitting too many strings. Just be careful you don't lay them so you mute the strings you're trying to play
#10
None of your original chords are power chords.
Quote by honkey
Wow that really cleared up alot. I pretty much just would play the barre version of
5
5
5
7
7
5

and it's alot easier to just bar instead of playing 3 strings.

That is an A minor barre chord.

Power Chords

Power chords are a harmonic interval of a perfect 5th. They are neither minor nor major in their tonality. They are not really chords, as chords are 3 or more notes played simultaneously. A power chord only has 2 (root and 5th), which makes it an interval. Power chords are written in a progression as _5, named after their root note. For example, a D power chord would be written as D5.

Power chords are formed by taking the root and 5th (scale degrees 1 and 5) of the root note's major scale. For example, a C power chord:

..Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
........*.......*.....*


The first and 5th notes are those that comprise a power chord. Therefore, a C power chord is the notes C and G played simultaneously - no more, and no less. You may include octaves of these notes as you see fit to give different sounds to the power chords.

Some common shapes to play power chords are as follows:
e|-----------3--3-------------3--3--------------6-----6----|
B|--------3--3--3-------------x--x--------6--6--6--6--6-6--|
G|--------x--x--0-----5-----5-5--5--5--5--5--5--3--3--3-3--|
D|-----5--5--5--0--5--5--5--5-5--5--3--3--3--3--3-------3--|
A|--5--5--5--5--x--3--3--3--3-3--3-----3--3----------------|
E|--3--3--3--3--3--3--3----------3-------------------------|
....G5.............C5...............F5..........Bb5.........

G5 is notes G D
C5 is notes C G
F5 is notes F C
Bb5 is notes Bb F


-SD
#11
Quote by honkey
Okay I know this is a powerchord

0
0
0
7
7
5


No, it isn't a powerchord. You aren't supposed to play the last three strings open. Play it like this instead:

x
x
x
7
7
5

Quote by honkey

I play these kinds of chords like this

5
5
5
7
7
5

Is that still a power chord?


No, that is a minor barchord with the root on the E string. So, since the root is the fifth fret on the E string, it's an Am barchord.

Quote by honkey

and is this a powerchord

7
7
5
5
5
5


Nope, not at all. That chord sounds horrible when played...

A powerchord is the root note played at the same time as the fifth of the root note (sometimes an octave is thrown in).

x
x
x
7 (octave of the root note, optional)
7 (fifth of the root note)
5 (root note)

If you're having trouble playing a power chord, try eliminating the octave. Play the root note with your index finger, and fret the fifth with your ring finger. It shouldn't be that hard.

Power chords are neutral-sounding, and clean over distortion, and have more power than conventional chords. They are essential to learn.
#13
Quote by honkey
Wow that really cleared up alot. I pretty much just would play the barre version of
5
5
5
7
7
5

and it's alot easier to just bar instead of playing 3 strings.


But it doesn't sound like a power chord at all. You want power chord sound, you play power chords.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#14
okay, I got it all*took notes* haha. Thanks for all that info.