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#1
i dont understand what pick-ups mean and what the hell they are can some explain to me
#2
A) pick up your ELECTRIC guitar
B) look at those 2 or 3 bar thingies between the neck and bridge and under the strings
C)........ those are it
Quote by bassmo_part2
Embryodead even if she was the hottest thing on the planet, there are lines you just don't cross and on my side of the line we don't finger our sisters.

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#3
A pickup device acts as a transducer that captures mechanical vibrations (usually from suitably equipped stringed instruments such as the electric guitar, electric bass guitar or electric violin) and converts them to an electronic signal which can be amplified and recorded.
#4
Are you serious?! Holy crap. Well pickups are those rectangular things behind the strings of you guitar. They pickup the sound from your string and transfer it to your amp through the patch cord. Oh, and the first string from you is the fattest and you tune your guitar using the tuning pegs on the head. Anything else?
#5
oh that **** the circles that you turn and they have names like volume and tones?
#6
...that too.
Quote by bassmo_part2
Embryodead even if she was the hottest thing on the planet, there are lines you just don't cross and on my side of the line we don't finger our sisters.

Official Member of the I <3 Schecter's Club, PM Schecter-06 to join
#8
no see the barrs under the strings on the body
they have metal dots on them those are pick ups
#9
NO...those are the knobs that CONTROL the pickups
Quote by bassmo_part2
Embryodead even if she was the hottest thing on the planet, there are lines you just don't cross and on my side of the line we don't finger our sisters.

Official Member of the I <3 Schecter's Club, PM Schecter-06 to join
#11
Volume controls volume, pretty obvious. I think tone sets how sensative your pickups are and they change the sound, I don't know how to explain it. The bar thing sticking out that you can move changes the pickup being used.
#12
Quote by ibanezbass27
you n00b

dude dont spam hes probobly a beginner man help him out, you were like him once
#15
Simple. Pickups are the things under your strings, and they're a type of basic microphone. The little knobs are the volume control and something which makes the guitar sound a little different - eg somebody playing classic rock might want a different tone to a death-metaller.

Edit ^ great idea, with the picture.
#16
i understand thanks but sometimes i whack my pick-ups does that **** them up
#17
I'm not certain, but it's not likely. You could, in theory, break anything if you hit it too hard, but the makers will expect people to accidentally hit their pickups every now and again, so they'll be fairly tough. Don't make a habit of it, though.
#19
Neither do I. I think that's more for perfectionists, really... somebody who's recording, and that sort of thing.
#20
when i turn on the amp and i play the sound of hte guitar sounds so bad
#22
like to much distortion and when i turn it down it still sounds bad
#24
ya nad when you turn on the tv adn you turn to a channel you dont have you know it makes this sound like tshshshshshshshshshshshshhs the same with my amp
#28
Go to the place you bought it from, and ask them if they know how to get the best tone out of it. All in all, I'd advise -
1.) getting a new amp
2.) learning without one.

In fact, your best bet is to try and get hold of an acoustic guitar - you never have to worry about anything except tuning and changing strings every now and again...
#30
England... thats why i needed to change the money if its fender, you probably could get better out of it. Go to the music store, and ask them about it. People who work in music shops quite often are seasoned guitarists, and know all about using an amp properly.

Oh, wait, is it small enough to fit into your hand?
#32
Screen? dude, I'm not talking about your tv. You mean the net bit that goes over the front?

if its that big, then it's either broke, or you've done something wrong with it. My amp's broke now - I fried it by putting it into a bad power-strip.

Hmm... right, are there any other amps in your house? If so, try it on them. If the same noise happens, there's a problem with your lead or your guitar. Try a different lead, and if the same problem happens, its probably your guitar. if its your lead, buy a new one, otherwise ask someone at a shop.
#33
^ PM each other if your gonna have a conversation.


The reason you dont hear any change when you change the tone pot is because its a cheap guitar most probably. On my squier strat i couldnt get the tone to change even when i replaced the pot.

Then i bought my new guitar and it works perfectly.


The reason your amp is making that noise is because of feedback and bad guitar shielding.
Anything electrical produces a frequency of around 50-60hz. This interferes with your guitars pickups (singles - not humbuckers) and the 50-60hz produces that 'squeal' or humm. Its called the 60 cycle hum.

You can hear it better if you stand under a pylon or next to a substation
Been away, am back
#34
I would have told him to delete the post with the address in, but I guess he'd gone.

Hmm, you seem to know more than me

EDIT: I'd always wondered what humbuckers do...
#35
^ yea the reduce hum...alot.
and dought wether his amp is going to be very big concidering he got it for £45. even my old fender frontman 15G cost more and thats a 15 watt.
>>Metal_Fretter<<

My gear:
Ibanez S470
Roland cube 30
Boss PW-10 v-wah
Marshall jackhammer
#36
^ I have a FF 15G... the only problem i have with it is the volume knob is very very sensitive at around 2.5 - 3. Almost blew my ear drums out once

Quote by chinesechipmunk

Hmm, you seem to know more than me
EDIT: I'd always wondered what humbuckers do...


Lol, Im always learning.
When about 3 months after i bought my first electric guitar, i bought my strat copy, so i tried selling my old one and someone asked how the action was.
And i was pretty much a n00b at guitar then, and i thought he ment how good did it feel to play.

Humbuckers are pretty cool.
Basically pickups are magnets with a peice of thin (usually) copper wire around them. The magnet magnetises the metal string. When you pluck the string, the strings vibration makes the magnetic field "wobble". The wobble then moves the electrons in the copper wire around the magnet and thats what the signal is. It then goes to the amp which amplifies the signal and then plays it on a speaker.

The only problem with single coil pickups is that they attract the 50-60hz that comes from electricity. In effect, anything electrical acts as another set of strings.

The best way to get rid of this, is to add another single coil to the pickup, but wind it in the opposite direction. This cancels out the way the single pickup picks up the 50-60hz, and therefore makes it silent.


Thats just it simplified. Alot of the technical aspects of it is to do with Physics (which i did for coursework while doing my a-levels which is why i know alot about how pickups work etc)
Been away, am back
#40
dissssssssgrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrraaaaaaccccccccccceeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee


its ok, we all were like that. well, they are special devices thats pick up vibration from the stringsd and make them hearable on the amp
My Rig :
Ibanez RG350DX
Dunlop JH1 Wah
Marshal MG10CD
JIMI "THE DEAD GOD" HENDRIX

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