#1
Will adjusting the screws denoted by the red lines hurt my intonation? What about the ones denoted by the blue lines. I DO NOT want to screw up my intonation. It is a fixed bridge on an Ibanez RGT42DXFX if it's not clear enough.
Attachments:
P5080087.JPG
#2
the reds one are the ones you use to set the action, the blue ones are the ones you use to set the intonation, if you lower the action then you probably will mess up the intonation a little bit but im not positive
Quote by R_H_C_P
^Oh my God! You're the first person to actually notice that link! A pringle to you my friend!


My Surf-o-Strat Project
#3
Raising or lowering actions may have altered the intonation quite a bit. You should check it after raising the action coz its prone to happen. But nothing you couldnt adjust by urself.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#4
a fixed bridge wont be "as" bad. but u really shouldnt worry about intonating. its just tuning at the 12th.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#5
So for intonation, turning the screws in will raise the pitch at the 12th fret and the open string, and I can adjust the tuning of the open string with the tuners? There was an excellent website that explained all this, but I can't find it, can someone link me?
#6
SETTING INTONATION:
Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.
If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same.

icepoint.com and we are talking about the blue lines.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#7
Is fret-buzz the only problem with too low of an action? The action on my guitar is now like scary low, I've never seen a guitar with this low of an action, and there is minimal fretbuzz.
#8
Factory setup guitars like the one you probably have seen, did not set their action as low as possible with minimal buzz. They have a standard system instead. For an Ibanez factory setup, the treble side have 1.5mm space in between the strings and 12th fretwire and the bass side have 2.0mm. You dont have to worry about "sick" low action or "scary" low action coz it'll just affect the way you play.

Too low may lead to fretbuzz, and makes your playing uncomfortable (ur long fingers are curled up really bad to reach the low strings). Too high of an action will really really make it uncomfortable as your fingers will prone to get stuck if you bend a note and its hard to play fast like this. Good action, or low-as-possible with minimal fret buzz will make the guitar's playability really easy and fast. Its easier to fret notes or chords because it require less energy to fret it. Its all preference.....you've heard this a lot and gonna hear it again and again.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic