#1
I've recently replaced the std gauge 9's in my RG for a set of hybrid slinky's (std trebles but thicker bass) and since then the bass strings have been buzzing like a bastard for the first five or so frets. Action seems about right to me (2mm low E, 1.7mm high E at 24th fret) but I tried adjusting it higher anyway but it's not really curing the buzz.

By eye if I fret at the 1st and 24th the neck looks pretty straight with little relief at the 7th fret. I feel that it needs adjusting to give more relief so that I can cure the buzzing and keep the action reasonably low. Thing is I'm not sure what sort of measurement I should be looking for at the 7th fret when fretted 1st & 24th. I've heard anywhere between say 0.2mm and 0.5mm. Should I just try it at the minimum and adjust until I'm happy but keep within this band?
#2
Generally, you want the action to be 2mm and 1.5 mm at the 12th fret, not the 24th. Your action is too low if you have 2mm on the low E at the 24th. Raise your action a touch and that should fix you right up.

Keep in mind that adjusting the action will require you to reset the intonation as well.
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#3
I reckon intonation will need changing anyway as they are different gauge strings. I tried adjusting the action right up on the low side (probbaly up by about 1.5mm maybe 2mm at bridge) and it was still buzzing on the low E and A. There appears to be little relief as I have said, again this is probably due to the thicker bass strings pulling the neck straighter. I haven;t got my measuring stick with me at the mo so I'll have to have a better look later.

I'm sure I;ve read on an ibanez site that those measurements should be at the 24th rather than the 12th though?
#4
Default Ibanez setup, 1.5mm treble side and 2.0mm on bass side. BETWEEN THE 12th FRETWIRE. I believe the hybrid strings u use are the 9-46, .09s and .46s on the bass. I use that string and set my Ibanez to the lowest possible with "minimal" buzz. Buzzing is one thing that you really cant get off if you test it just by ear without plugging ur guitar onto the amp, that is if you want it to be as low, comfortable and fast as possible.

Try plugging in your guitar to your amp 1st before adjusting the action. Tune it up 1st to ur wishful tunings. Play chromatics all along the fretboard and check the buzz. Remember, you want to play fast with minimal buzz, thus you cannot pick it so hard or fret a note too lightly, you have to apply good amount of pressure to it and pick it in such way to prevent buzz.

The last thing you dont want to do is messing up ur neck by wanking the truss rod. 9-46s shouldnt be any problem to fit in the factory setup action Ibanez. *Important note, you DONT always follow all the measurement from people. Its ur own preference, i cant strict more about this unless ure too much of a noob to all this . Its all trial and error, knowing more about ur guitar.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
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Last edited by madpickin03 at May 9, 2006,
#5
Well put it this way, when I first got it I had slight buzz on some of the bass strings with low frets, normal playing. Since fitting the new strings, setting trem to neutral, tuning they do buzz really quite badly acosutically. I will try it through the amp later, but I'm pretty sure they'll buzz, they even buzz sometimes when played open.
I'm pretty sure fitting 9-46 would still cause a change in neck bow. Half the strings are thicker than they were and hence under more tension, which puts the neck under more tension adjusting the bow - IMO. I'm a guitar noob yes, but I learn fast and am an engineer by trade so hope to have a good understanding of things like this.

I will try setting to what you suggested at the 12th fret, although I really did crank up the action earlier and it was still buzzing on the low strings up to at least the 5th fret.

I'll give it a quick try
#6
Yes you tend to get buzzez here n there when you play open coz you're hitting the note hard to hear it. It wouldnt be as hard if you plugged in through an amp. And about the strings, seriously, even if you put a regular gauge, 10-46 the neck still is playable and there arent much different if you use normal truss rod factory setting. There arent much noticable different in the neck bow either.

This is a 9-46, which has lower tension rather than the 10-46 so it really really should work just fine (unless the shop where you bought it had messed up with the truss rod).
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
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#7
OK, here's how you check your neck relief correctly. Capo your strings at the first fret. Fret your low E at the 17th fret and measure the gap between the top of the 7th-9th fret and the bottom of the string. You should have a clearance of 0.25 mm. Too little clearance means you will have to loosen the truss rod a bit. Too much clearance and you have to tighten it a bit.
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#8
^ no need for a capo, just fret the 1st and 16th/ 17th fret (where the neck meets the body) and see the 8th fretwire. Ibanez default clearance is 0.3mm - 0.5mm. Repeat this step for all strings.

I dont recommend you doing this until you are really 100% positively sure that thats the problem. Also lets pros do it if you love ur neck.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
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#9
Well, if you're using a measuring device (I use a feeler gauge), it's hard to fret the strings at 2 positions and simultaneously handle the feeler gauge to take the measurement. Hence why I recommend a capo.

And I would add that there's no point in measuring your relief on more than 1 string unless you're looking for a twisted neck. It's not like you can individually adjust each of them. When you set the truss rod, it affects the neck which affects all strings. Pick the thickest string (the one most likely to rattle and buzz) and make your measurements from there. You can check the others as well, but like I said, unless you're looking for a twisted neck, there's no real value in doing that.
Guitars: Custom Lado Earth 2000-3, Custom ESP Explorer, BC Rich KKV, Gibson LP Studio, Greco SG, El Degas Stratocaster, Agile AL-3000, LTD EX-351

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#10
Cheers guys, 17th to 24th fret won't make loads of difference as the neck is pretty much straight as it meets the body, but I'll do it at the 17th with .25mm in mind.
Thing that gets me is so many people say don;t do it if you;re not sure - yet I've said that there is very little neck relief at the 7th - not .25mm that's for sure, so surely it does need adjsuting. And as for wanking the neck or truss rod, unless you go mad with loads of turns I can't see a problem, I'll back it out by an 1/8th of a turn and leave it for a while, then re-check.

The guitar was setup by a luthier before I bought it from my friend (he hadn't used it for a few years though) so maybe he set relief and action, etc to be spot on for it at the time and so no longer at factory settings.

I'm buggering about with the missus' car at the mo, but once I;ve finshed I'll get the feeler gauges out and report back
#11
You seem to have the method of adjusting the truss rod correct. And you're right. As long as you make small, incremental adjustments and leave time for the neck to settle between changes, you'll be fine.

I give it at most 1/8th of a turn adjustment, and I leave te neck settle for about 5 minutes before checking and making any more adjustments. If a guitar was correctly set up for lighter guage strings, I don't think I've ever had to loosen the truss rod more than 1/8 to 1/4 turn to get it back perfect.

I don't know the specifics of 24 fret Ibanez necks, but id madpickin03 says they recommend 0.3-0.5 mm, then that works for me. I'd say start by getting it 0.3mm, and if it still buzzes, loosen it a little more. Repeat till the buzzing stops of you hit 0.5 mm.
Guitars: Custom Lado Earth 2000-3, Custom ESP Explorer, BC Rich KKV, Gibson LP Studio, Greco SG, El Degas Stratocaster, Agile AL-3000, LTD EX-351

Rig:Marshall JVM410H + Marshall 1960A, Boss Noise Suppressor
#12
OK so fretting at 1st and 17th, clearance at 8th fret between low e anf fret is about 0.12mm - a little close I'd say!! I'll adjust to 0.2mm and see how it feels
#13
Adjusted to around 0.3mm relief at the 8th and it's much better Think I'll leave the neck to settle over night and check it over again in the morning.

Strange truss rod, had an allen head bolt rather than the usual hex head type. It was also a funny size, somehwere between 4mm and 5mm, obviously imperial!!
#14
Good stuff dude. Glad you got it all worked out.
Guitars: Custom Lado Earth 2000-3, Custom ESP Explorer, BC Rich KKV, Gibson LP Studio, Greco SG, El Degas Stratocaster, Agile AL-3000, LTD EX-351

Rig:Marshall JVM410H + Marshall 1960A, Boss Noise Suppressor
#15
Oh yes - she sounds better already, although plenty could make it sound better than I can
#16
Hey, you have to learn how to do it eventually. Sounds like your first truss rod adjustment worked out without a hitch.
Guitars: Custom Lado Earth 2000-3, Custom ESP Explorer, BC Rich KKV, Gibson LP Studio, Greco SG, El Degas Stratocaster, Agile AL-3000, LTD EX-351

Rig:Marshall JVM410H + Marshall 1960A, Boss Noise Suppressor
#18
Meh, all of you wif feel gauges and gadgets and whatnot....i just use my eyes and 2 fingers , not forgetting a trusty pvc ruler.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#19
My eyes ain't what they used to be!! I use a rule for action, but got the feelers out for measuring relief