#1
i can't seem to make the guitar distinct enough when the vocals come in. if i turn up the guitar, then the vocals get drowned out. any suggestions? (btw i'm recording out of a Boss BR-1600)
#2
ya, double track the guitar... record it once and hard-pan it left, then record it again and hard-pan that track right... itll sound much fuller and distinct but the same volume.

http://n0e.dmusic.com/music/download/309576/.8c49a0ab

i recorded all the guitar parts except the guitar solo twice, and hard-panned em left and right just to give you an example of the sound.
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser (Black Cherry)
Peavey 6505 Plus Head: 120W all-tube goodness
Peavey 6505 4x12 Slant Cab
Tacoma Somethin-or-other Acoustic (i bought it used)
#3
Well usually the answer to this problem is professional mastering. Add some limiting, mixing tricks, etc., and you got a so-lid mix.

Otherwise, you have to resort to possibly adjusting the EQs on the guitar. This can sometimes help with what seems to be a volume issue.

What software are you using?
Looking for my India/Django.
#4
okay in response,

i did double track the guitar..one guitar is panned 60 to the left, the other 60 to the right. they're essentially doing the same parts until the verses and the choruses..one's on a Mesa Dual and the other on a Marshall Jubilee.

and i'm not using software, it's a 16 track multitracker by Boss. BR-1600CD, check it out it's REALLY nifty.

any other tips?

EDIT: my main trouble is keeping the guitar seperated from the vocals, if that helps.
Last edited by AmazinAzian014 at May 10, 2006,
#5
its all to do with EQ and compression.

if your using a digital multy track then it should have some sort of plug ins.

first try compressing the guitar and vocals. this should help seperate them dynamicly. if your problem is that the vocals swamp everything, try taking out about 500Hz, or look around that general area. because thats usualy what swamps things. or just try and roll off some bass. and ive always forund that guitars sometimes need a boost at around 2kHz because thats what gives it its distinctive sound.

well thats all prety vauge. but yea give it a try.
please lick my balls.

i love it when you do because your sexy.
#6
A lot modern bands use high bass and treble, and low mids, to get that hjeavy, saturated nu metal sound.

But, you need the mids to really cut through the mix.

first try compressing the guitar and vocals. this should help seperate them dynamicly. if your problem is that the vocals swamp everything, try taking out about 500Hz, or look around that general area. because thats usualy what swamps things. or just try and roll off some bass. and ive always forund that guitars sometimes need a boost at around 2kHz because thats what gives it its distinctive sound.


^ that's really good advice
#7
nah i'm not for the nu-metal sound. i'm goin for the 80's hair metal/hard rock sound.. i'll give that a shot though.