#1
ok, because of a recent load of threads about anchoring i have decided to try unanchoring to see if its any better...

so 20 minutes practice with a hovering arm this is what i get:

1> bicep ache, my upper arm has been feeling like i hav been working out? is this normal and something to get used to?

2> slower picking.. i am guessing this is something that builds up with time, but before i could pick pretty fast and accurate and now my playing has ended up sloppy and the fastest thing i can manage is kissing the shadows by COB minus the lead breaks

3> i have to tense my upper arm to keep my forearm hovering above the strings... but i thought the idea was to decrease the amount of tension?

4> the fluid picking i used to get from my wrist action has now turned into me picking using my elbow to move my hand... which is the "technically" correct way to pick? wrist or elbow?

so i have to ask the guys (and girls) who are really really really good, is it worth all the effort of re - learning how to pick?

How do you stop feedback without resting your palm on the E, Aand D strings while playing a lead on the g, b and e stings?

I think i have reached the dead point in improvement that people were talking about in the anchor or no anchor thread and want to get around this,

please dont turn this into an anchor or no anchor thread i would just like some advice on why i have all these muscle aches and if there is stil something wrong with my technique

thanks
#2
You're doing it wrong. You shouldn't need to tense up, just merely holding the arm in place doesn't involve getting tense.

Also, you do still pick from your wrist. So if you're doing what I think you are doing, you won't improve at all.

It is worth relearning to pick, but relearn the correct way.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#3
Quote by Prophet of Page
You're doing it wrong. You shouldn't need to tense up, just merely holding the arm in place doesn't involve getting tense.

Also, you do still pick from your wrist. So if you're doing what I think you are doing, you won't improve at all.

It is worth relearning to pick, but relearn the correct way.


can you exaplin the correct way and what i am doing wrong please?
#4
I used to anchor, but as of about two weeks ago, I learned to stop. You should learn how to do it, it made my picking better after only 2 weeks.
#5
Quote by Johnny83191
I used to anchor, but as of about two weeks ago, I learned to stop. You should learn how to do it, it made my picking better after only 2 weeks.



that is what i am hoping to acheive but i need help as i thinki may still be doing it incorrecty...
#6
Quote by nofxnofxnofx
can you exaplin the correct way and what i am doing wrong please?


Don't hold your arm stiffly, hold it loosely. And pick from your wrist, not your elbow.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#7
I haven't seen any improvement over a month either. If it doesn't work for you don't do it
#8
If you're having to strain your bicep and shoulder, DON'T. It's pointless. There is no right way to hover your arm above the bridge and attempt to pick. There is no stability, and the extra effort is gonna tire out your arm. The closest you're going to get to hovering, is going to be either strumming, (which I'm assuming isn't your goal), resting a finger or two on the pickguard area, or resting wrist on bridge. Notice I say "resting," not glue-ing.

Use common sense. Playing guitar is a natural thing. Don't complicate it with bullcrap.
#9
Quote by nofxnofxnofx
ok, because of a recent load of threads about anchoring i have decided to try unanchoring to see if its any better...

so 20 minutes practice with a hovering arm this is what i get:

1> bicep ache, my upper arm has been feeling like i hav been working out? is this normal and something to get used to?

2> slower picking.. i am guessing this is something that builds up with time, but before i could pick pretty fast and accurate and now my playing has ended up sloppy and the fastest thing i can manage is kissing the shadows by COB minus the lead breaks

3> i have to tense my upper arm to keep my forearm hovering above the strings... but i thought the idea was to decrease the amount of tension?

4> the fluid picking i used to get from my wrist action has now turned into me picking using my elbow to move my hand... which is the "technically" correct way to pick? wrist or elbow?

so i have to ask the guys (and girls) who are really really really good, is it worth all the effort of re - learning how to pick?

How do you stop feedback without resting your palm on the E, Aand D strings while playing a lead on the g, b and e stings?

I think i have reached the dead point in improvement that people were talking about in the anchor or no anchor thread and want to get around this,

please dont turn this into an anchor or no anchor thread i would just like some advice on why i have all these muscle aches and if there is stil something wrong with my technique

thanks


1.) Well this sort of pain is from having your arm constantly raised over a guitar. Depending on the build of your guitar you can get pains in the back of your shoulder blade due to bad posture. It is fine if you have the top of your arm resting lightly on the top of the guitar, but don't have it bearing into it.

2.) You have to get used to it.

3.) You are doing it in a slightly retarded manner.

4.) Whether the way you pick "right" or not is dependent on the sort of motion you use for picking. Simply put, in about all the movements, elbow movement would be considered "bad." (Rotary in the elbow is okay.) It sounds like to me that you are doing a translatory movement (side to side) wrist movement. It just so happens this is the slowest and you need to go faster later on, and causes ridiculous amounts of tension (just watch Rusy Cooley play!)

5.) Well first off you ask yourself "Am I using a ridiculous amout of gain?" If the answer is yes, turn it down. Now you look at your muting technique. I get tired of explaining muting technique, so here it is in a nutshell.

Use your fret hand to mute notes under your fingers. Use your right hand palm to mute notes that are above those fingers by grabbing down at them. On a side note, in instances when you need to palm mute, you can use your palm or your pinky.

And for all of you anchorer-extremists to believe that there are any benefits or release of tension from unanchoring, grab a pencil and some paper as I found out a good way to illustrate the releasing of tension during D-hall. (who else here analyzes their writing technique whne they have to write 200 definitions ^_^?)

Anyways, with your sheet and paper, choose some sort of sentence you are going to write.

Now lay your pinky and palm down in a "rooted" position for writing. Start writing a sentence, like "I'm a stubborn douchebag who refuses to see the benefits of unanchored technique."

Now adjust the pencil so that you can write while having your wrist hovering slightly over the paper. Your forearm (near the eblow) can be on the table still. Now write the same sentence. Chances are its a whole lot sloppier but things will feel more "free" and looser because you now have a wider range of motion now available to you. This accurately represents the release of tension from unanchoring.

You can do the same with your keyboard. Have your palm rooted while typing something, then lift them up and type the same sentence again.

Now all you have to do is learn how to apply that to your picking technique.
#12
thanks for all the help, i have realised what i was doing was actually sort of right, i never used my pinky to anchor just rested the side of my hand/wrist when playing higher strings. This means that i actually only rest my hand, and i thought this was counted as an anchor, but i was obviously wrong.

thanks again
#13
Quote by nofxnofxnofx
i never used my pinky to anchor just rested the side of my hand/wrist when playing higher strings. This means that i actually only rest my hand, and i thought this was counted as an anchor, but i was obviously wrong.


Uhm, it is.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#14
3> i have to tense my upper arm to keep my forearm hovering above the strings... but i thought the idea was to decrease the amount of tension?


This sounds famillar to me. I noticed that keeping my arm hovering was causing a bit of tension. Since my guitar teacher kept having a go at me for about a month about my bad habit I needed to find a way of stopping that tension. I realised the tension was caused by how high (or low) my arm was. This meant my strap needed adjusting. So I found a height I could hold my arm loosely at without all that tension. Then I adjusted my strap height. Now I never get tension from loosely hovering my arm because I have found a natural height to do this.
Sat in a lab, curing diseases. They actually LET me play with chemicals!
#15
I still think it's more natural to have your forearm resting on the guitar. You don't have to support your arm as much that way, thus ridding your body of a bit of tension. And find me one fast rock guitarist who always free-floats his picking arm.
#16
I can strum and play everything without any problems with my forearm on the guitar - although I can see an arguement for not having your hand/fingers on the guitar.