#1
I have a Schecter C-1 Electric/Acoustic (hollow body with 2 Duncan Design humbuckers and a Ghost Electrophonic piezo system). It's great, sleek neck and very playable.

The problem, though, is that the bottom end comes through a LOT more than the high end, to the point that sometimes playing 12th fret B string is barely audible, but playing on the low E or A strings comes through like an overpowering fuzz. This happens on both the Duncan Design humbuckers and the peizo, so I don't think it's the pups. Anyway, it's annoying, I can't play some jazz chords in low positions because they just come through as low noise, and sometimes I just get little pings on my high E string. I get this response from lots of different amps.

Is the massive bass response from the acoustic resonance of bass notes within the hollow body?

Could I doctor my sound by running a good EQ pedal (like a 10-band) between my guitar and amplifier? Can I simply roll back the low end?

(yes, I've tried my tone knob, and I'm almost positive that the tone pot is good)

P.S. Strings aren't light- GHS Boomers, but honestly I dont wanna play anything lighter.

Thanks to anyone with insights or experience.
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#2
try a compressor pedal.

or try EQing the amp itself instead. turning the lows down, and cranking the mids and highs. and if it has it, boost the presence up.

[edit]

I play Boomers as well. 10-52s on all my guitars. Dont go any heavier then that.
#3
Quote by kurdtkobaign
try a compressor pedal.

or try EQing the amp itself instead. turning the lows down, and cranking the mids and highs. and if it has it, boost the presence up.

[edit]

I play Boomers as well. 10-52s on all my guitars. Dont go any heavier then that.


Pretty much the best advice I've heard all day. A compressor pedal will be a nice touch, also EQ your amp correctly..

IF that doesn't work you can get an EQ pedal and try it out, dip the bass and boost the treble..
#4
What's the best comp. anyway............ Mr. Squishy ??
Tone is all ...... well probably 75%, in your fingers.
The rest depends on your wallet's thickness !!

Keep the faith, baby!!
#5
Quote by bluespunkmetal
What's the best comp. anyway............ Mr. Squishy ??


the boss is alright. the thing about compressors is you almost always have to put a noise suppressor behind them.
#6
Why, cobain ??

BTW, nice sig........ I'm an Asian m'self
Tone is all ...... well probably 75%, in your fingers.
The rest depends on your wallet's thickness !!

Keep the faith, baby!!
#7
Quote by me an my gitar
I have a Schecter C-1 Electric/Acoustic (hollow body with 2 Duncan Design humbuckers and a Ghost Electrophonic piezo system). It's great, sleek neck and very playable.

The problem, though, is that the bottom end comes through a LOT more than the high end, to the point that sometimes playing 12th fret B string is barely audible, but playing on the low E or A strings comes through like an overpowering fuzz. This happens on both the Duncan Design humbuckers and the peizo, so I don't think it's the pups. Anyway, it's annoying, I can't play some jazz chords in low positions because they just come through as low noise, and sometimes I just get little pings on my high E string. I get this response from lots of different amps.

Is the massive bass response from the acoustic resonance of bass notes within the hollow body?

Could I doctor my sound by running a good EQ pedal (like a 10-band) between my guitar and amplifier? Can I simply roll back the low end?

(yes, I've tried my tone knob, and I'm almost positive that the tone pot is good)

P.S. Strings aren't light- GHS Boomers, but honestly I dont wanna play anything lighter.

Thanks to anyone with insights or experience.

You posted this in a different thread, and I'm going to ask the same question:

What amp are you using?
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
peavy classic 50, traynor ycv 50, and i play on a marshall mg100 sometimes for metal but i know it's crap
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#9
Quote by bluespunkmetal
Why, cobain ??

BTW, nice sig........ I'm an Asian m'self


you can thank that_pink_queen for that one. that was ultimate pwnage at its best.

but anyways, compressors are taking the signal from the guitar and leveling it out.

umm...ill try to think of a way to explain it...

Think of a soundwave being all wacked up, with sharp edges and uneven peaks and valleys. This is the signal from your guitar. The peaks are the loudest part, and the valleys are way more quiet.

So if you strum a power chord, the peak will be the first string you hit, and the valley will be the last one you hit.

What the compressor does is takes the peaks and levels them down, and takes the valleys and levels them up.

Now that soundwave isnt all wacked up with sharp uneven edges...its smoother and more balanced out.


its really hard to explain really. compressors are really good for solos, especially solos with tapping. so all the notes you pick are the same volume.

the reason why compressors are so noisy is because of those valleys i talked about. Its taking those quieter notes and boosting them up which causes hissing.

wow...hard to explain....hope yall got the jist of it lol
#10
why is a compressor more effective in cutting low end than an EQ?
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#11
does it have to be a high quality compressor?

(does the boss work well?)
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#12
Quote by me an my gitar
why is a compressor more effective in cutting low end than an EQ?


well most come with a tone knob so you can turn it up or down to boost or cut highs/lows for one.

and the reason i said try a compressor was because you said that when you hit chords theres some notes in the chord that ring out way louder then others....

in this case, refer to my explanation of compressors.

but seriously... have you EQed your amp right?

[edit] yea, the Boss is a fairly decent pedal.
#13
I was wondering that myself, since compressors are for eliminating variation in volume, not for EQ necessarily.

And I don't think Stephen Hawking would understand that explanation of compression
Hi, I'm Peter
#14
ya, i can eq the amp right, but if i want to EQ if for mellow tone, i get suuuper low-end mellow.
Its like I either get bright or soupy low.
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#15
I just know my guitar sounds darker than others, notably strat/ tele style guitars. And sometimes my chords just get lost in low-end, unless I turn the bass way low, and then its tinny
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#16
Hello, the pwner is here himself.

I'd say new pickups...IMO Duncan designed/Gibson designed pickups tend to be really muddy stock, especially if they have chrome covers...you could remove the covers if they're on there. Easy mod, and helps alot.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#17
Quote by Dirk Gently
I was wondering that myself, since compressors are for eliminating variation in volume, not for EQ necessarily.

And I don't think Stephen Hawking would understand that explanation of compression


yeah, but EQing isnt his only problem...according the starting post.


Id kick Steven Hawkings ass at guitar, pole-vault, and quarters.

but seriously...its how do you explain how compressors work!?!? lol
#18
Could it be the speaker ??
Tone is all ...... well probably 75%, in your fingers.
The rest depends on your wallet's thickness !!

Keep the faith, baby!!
#19
Quote by That_Pink_Queen
Hello, the pwner is here himself.


*trumpet intro*

oh and pwner rhymes with boner. remember that.
#20
are seymour duncans (JB/ '59 combo) brighter?
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#21
this happens on all amps I've played on, its just a charactersicit of the guitar and pups
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#22
Did someone want a compressor explanation? Basically, you set a threshold, and the compressor squishes down the signal that is above that threshold, and then boosts the signal below the threshold. It chanches the dynamics a bit.

I don't find it all that helpful for EQ though, either.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#23
EDIT:
Both the JB and the Jazz are pretty trebly for HB's IMO, the Jazz especially so. The JB isn't a great p'up though...kind of blah sounding. I've heard it sounds decent with very careful adjusting though.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#24
look into the Sey-Dunc SH-10

it has a high output and i think its EQed with good highs and low...lows...lol
#25
so an EQ pedal would be an appropriate solution to my problem, if its an EQ problem?

Or I could get new pups. I know that the higher-end schecters have seymour duncans
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#26
Quote by kurdtkobaign
but seriously...its how do you explain how compressors work!?!? lol

First, peaks and valleys are just a natural part of all soundwaves. It's inaccurate to say the peaks are louder and the valleys are quieter. What makes a difference in volume is the distance between the crest of the peak and the dip in the valley. The farther the distance, the more "volume." What a compressor does is create a ceiling and a floor, essentially. The soundwaves' peaks and valleys are not allowed to pass through the ceiling and the floor, but also quieter notes, with the peaks and valleys closer, are given a boost so that they fit a little closer to the floor and ceiling. This is why a compressor removes most of the dynamic variation from the sound passing through it. Not only are harder pick attacks quieted, but softer pick attacks are boosted so that the resulting sound is even.
Hi, I'm Peter
#27
i dont think a compressor will solve my problem at the root. it might help balance volumes a little bit, cause the low strings resonate louder than the higher ones, but I dont think it will be enough
Killing... Raping... Bridge Burning... Forsaken...
-Aint Life Grand
#28
Quote by Dirk Gently
First, peaks and valleys are just a natural part of all soundwaves. It's inaccurate to say the peaks are louder and the valleys are quieter. What makes a difference in volume is the distance between the crest of the peak and the dip in the valley. The farther the distance, the more "volume." What a compressor does is create a ceiling and a floor, essentially. The soundwaves' peaks and valleys are not allowed to pass through the ceiling and the floor, but also quieter notes, with the peaks and valleys closer, are given a boost so that they fit a little closer to the floor and ceiling. This is why a compressor removes most of the dynamic variation from the sound passing through it. Not only are harder pick attacks quieted, but softer pick attacks are boosted so that the resulting sound is even.


dirk's explanation >>> andy's

ugh...

anyways, if youre looking for Duncan pups.

the SH-10 is EQed at (lows, mids, highs): 4/4/8
the SH-11 is EDed at (lows, mids, highs): 3/7/7

[edit] and dirk i dont know your name so im just calling you Dirk...lol