#1
I know most of my different types of scales, but can anyone tell me what the Dorian scale is? Help would be appreciated. Thanks.
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#2
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I know most of my different types of scales, but can anyone tell me what the Dorian scale is? Help would be appreciated. Thanks.


the dorian scale is the second mode of the major scale

its formula is: WHWWWHW

example: play all the notes in C major but starting and ending on D



D dorian
|---------------------|
|---------------------|
|------------4-5-7----|
|------3-5-7----------|
|--5-7----------------|
|---------------------|
Last edited by seljer at May 12, 2006,
#4
I like Dorian though doesn't sound as regualr as a normal minor cause of the 6th note, where can i find the theory about it?
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#6
There are 7 modes of the Major scale. Each mode is built off one degree of the major scale, and uses that one degree as its root.

The seven modes:
Ionian = Major scale
Dorian
Phrygian
Lydian
Mixolydian
Aeolian
Locrian
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#7
Modes of the Major Scale

First of all, a mode is a scale derived from a different scale. The basis behind deriving modes is making a note that is not the tonic your new root note! There are 7 basic modes derived from the major scale. If you don't know the major scale, CLICK HERE.

Anyways, since there are 7 notes in the major scale, you can have 7 different root notes (or starting points) and still be in the same key. For the purpose of this lesson I'll be using the key of C, because it has no flats and no sharps, and is one of the most common keys.
Here's a diagram to help with the concept:

Key of Cmaj: C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F?
[b]C[/b] Ionian     [b]C[/b] D E F G A B [b]C[/b]
[b]D[/b] Dorian       [b]D[/b] E F G A B C [b]D[/b]
[b]E[/b] Phrygian       [b]E[/b] F G A B C D [b]E[/b]
[b]F[/b] Lydian           [b]F[/b] G A B C D E [b]F[/b]
[b]G[/b] Mixolydian         [b]G[/b] A B C D E F [b]G[/b]
[b]A[/b] Aeolian              [b]A[/b] B C D E F G [b]A[/b]
[b]B[/b] Locrian                [b]B[/b] C D E F G A [b]B[/b]
[b]Bold[/b] notes are root notes of each scale.


First of all, start thinking of notes as scale degrees:

  Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1


The names of the modes, in order, are Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian, and they start on their respective scale degrees.

Starting on the first degree, you get 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1, which is Ionian. Also the major scale.

Starting on the second degree, your notes are D E F G A B C D. This is the Dorian mode. Its formula is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1. Here's why:


 Degrees: 1 2 3  4 5 6 7  1
 D scale: D E F# G A B C# D

D Dorian: D E F  G A B C  D
 Degrees: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1


You should be able to see how the F# was flatted down to F natural and C# down to C natural. That is how each mode's formula is found.

The third mode is Phrygian, its formula is 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1. In the key of C, the notes would be E F G A B C D E = E Phrygian.

The fourth is Lydian. Formula is 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1.

5th is Mixolydian, 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1.

6th is Aeolian, or the natural minor scale. 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1.

7th is Locrian, which is a half diminished scale. 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1.

These formulas are intervals in relation to the major scale. The major scale is used as a reference for just about everything, and modes are no exception.

Therefore, the 7 modes in the key of C are:
C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian
B Locrian

-SD