#1
What are some methods to solo over weird progressions? Say there's a secondary dominant in the progression I IV V (V)V in C<- is that how you write fifth of fifth? Anyway, that would be C F G D, which at the D raises F to F#.. while the D is being played, would you just change Fs to F#s? avoid Fs all together? move to G mixolydian, etc?

Also something like I bIII IV.. say D F G. That's borrowing the major bIII from the parralel minor right? I forget what it's called.. Well should I switch to D minor for that one, maybe F major?

And ones I don't even understand.. like Wishful Sinful by The Doors. If someone could look at those chords and give some explanation about it it'd be great
Last edited by Ead at May 13, 2006,
#2
Quote by Ead
What are some methods to solo over weird progressions? Say there's a secondary dominant in the progression I IV V (V)V in C<- is that how you write fifth of fifth? Anyway, that would be C F G D, which at the D raises F to F#.. while the D is being played, would you just change Fs to F#s? avoid Fs all together? move to G mixolydian, etc?


I have seen the secondary dominant chord written as V/V. So the progression is notated: I IV V V/V.

"while the D is being played, would you just change Fs to F#s" <- Yes. You should play some kind of D scale that has the notes of the C Major Scale, but has a F# note instead of F.

D Mixolydian = D E F# G A B C D

Therefore, you could play:
C Major - F Lydian - G Mixolydian - D Mixolydian

But there many opportunities. You can play any scale over the V/V chord that has the notes of the Dmaj chord (D F# A).
#3
In a progression with just one chord that is outside the key, I will usually just change the appropriate note(s) to cover that chord. In other words, I try to stay as close to the original scale as I can. This usually makes the chord change and melody sound smoother.
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