#1
Okay, now I've spent the past week on guitar research, and thanks to many people on this site, I've learned a lot of infromation. I'd have to say, you guys rock and so does this site.

But anyways, so I'm getting a guitar in a month or so, and I'm still stuck on a few questions. I'm thinking about getting an electric, so my first question is:

1. Is there a difference between a plugged el-acoustic and a plugged electric?

2. Also I'm concered about the action of the guitar. What does action affect? If it's lower will it be easier to hold the strings? But if its lower will it also cause buzzing?

3. And one very last important question... Ive played acoustic all my life, and Im quite good at it, but Ive never touched an electric. So what exactly is the difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic guitar? And what is the difference in soound?

Any help would be deeply appreciated!
"1456"... if you're reading this, you know what the code means, and i mean every word of it.... 1456!!!
#2
well to me the el-acoustic would be the way to go. electrics lack the rich tonal quality of a fine acoustic in my opinion. and an El-acoustic cranked with distortionis what I like. But I would suggestwalking into a music store,and ask to try an electric out, they shouldplug you into a decent amp and play away seeif you like the feel. and the action is allpersonalpreference. When the action is low it is a little easier to pressdown on the strings, and unless theres something set up improperly it shouldnt buzz at all
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#3
Acoustic plugged is just louder acoustic sound, electric guitar plugged sounds different, ususally electric guitars have smaller necks and are easy to bend, electric guitars do not have that acoustic feel.
#4
Well, addition to the questions above.

4.) I recently got a pick-up put in my seagull S6. I can't play it distorted, there's just an annoying low pitched buzz that cuts through the acoustic sound.(i'm playing through a Crate elec. 30 watt amp.
#5
Quote by blink-182.5
Acoustic plugged is just louder acoustic sound, electric guitar plugged sounds different, ususally electric guitars have smaller necks and are easy to bend, electric guitars do not have that acoustic feel.


Actually, Accoustic plugged through a pickup/accoustic amp is a much different sound than a mic'ed accoustic. I personally really prefer the mic'ed sound, as it more closely resembles the orignal (albiet quieter) sound.

#6
Quote by .:iloveyou:.
Okay, now I've spent the past week on guitar research, and thanks to many people on this site, I've learned a lot of infromation. I'd have to say, you guys rock and so does this site.

But anyways, so I'm getting a guitar in a month or so, and I'm still stuck on a few questions. I'm thinking about getting an electric, so my first question is:

1. Is there a difference between a plugged el-acoustic and a plugged electric?

2. Also I'm concered about the action of the guitar. What does action affect? If it's lower will it be easier to hold the strings? But if its lower will it also cause buzzing?

3. And one very last important question... Ive played acoustic all my life, and Im quite good at it, but Ive never touched an electric. So what exactly is the difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic guitar? And what is the difference in soound?

Any help would be deeply appreciated!


1) Of course. The main difference between a plugged electric/acoustic and an unplugged e/a is the lack of natural resonance that the wooden body creates, though if you're in a small enough area you can still hear it. The e/a has a naturally fuller sound (if you're using a mic pickup) and will of course have an overall different sound because of the different strings. Plugged in acoustic electrics don't sound like electrics, generally. Those crazy Taylor T5's or whatever though are something else... they can sound pretty close.

2) Yes, action, or the height of strings from the fretboard, can affect many factors in your playing and sound. The most obvious ones are ones you've mentioned: buzzing when the action is too low, and difficulty of play when it is too high. Most people agree that higher action generall means better tone, but that's a personal thing. You need to find a nice middle ground. My action is right above where the buzzing starts, as I don't notice tone loss and I can still fret the strings with reasonable ease.

3) The first thing you'll notice about an electric guitar, even before you plug it in, is that it is MUCH easier to play. Less tension on the strings, lower action, etc. With that said, the sound is obviously different. No resonating bodies to create that full rich sound, different metals for the strings, and different source of amplification altogether. Electrics generally have more sustain, are easier to play and be amplified louder, and are more easily modified through effects and whatnot.
My God, it's full of stars!
#7
So it's because of the amp an electric uses to produce its sound is what makes it different from an acoustic sound because acoustic amplifies itself...?


and:
4.) I recently got a pick-up put in my seagull S6. I can't play it distorted, there's just an annoying low pitched buzz that cuts through the acoustic sound.(i'm playing through a Crate elec. 30 watt amp.


Well, as stated above it's probably because your action is low, which is causing the buzzing sound.
"1456"... if you're reading this, you know what the code means, and i mean every word of it.... 1456!!!
#8
Basically, a straight-up solidbody electric makes next to no sound unplugged. It only makes sound when there's power coming through it.

A hollowbody or semi-hollowbody will sound almost acoustic... But different.

An electro-coustic plugged in won't sound like either a full acoustic or a full electric, but unplugged will sound acoustic.