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#1
Ok, so I've been playing guitar since early January....so that's what...four months and some change?
I'll list a few songs I know how to play: "Punk Rock Love" and "Made in NYC" by the Casualties, Mary Had a Little Lamb, Happy Birthday, the beginnings of "Chicken**** Conformist" and "Too drunk to ****" by the Dead Kennedys, and a bunch of easy stuff like that.
I am really interested in becoming a good guitarist. I want to learn all of this E Minor, etc, that you guys all speak of.
I've been looking for lessons, but everyone is well out of my way.
I've also tried searching the internet for things that are easy to understand, but to no prevail.
I would highly appreciate it if anyone would help me with my problem of not being able to escalate as a guitarists.
One more thing, when I try and do my own thing, and make up my own songs...they're always in power chords.....haha, please someone help me.
Thank you.
#2
do you know all the notes? learning the notes is the first step, then you should learn scales, and open chords, and all sorts of tricky stuff. the style of music you seem to listen to doesnt offer much variety and talent to play so it might be a good idea to look into other genres and see what else interests you
#3
Learn your chords first and foremost.

Get your rhythm and timing sorted.

Try as many different chord progressions and strum patterns as you can.

Learn Barre chords.

Learn scales to help with lead playing and improvisation.

Most of all, have fun.
#4
See, I don't know what scales, and I do play open chords occasionally.
Thanks for the reply.
And what genre would you suggest?
...haha, what can I say? I love punk.
#5
Quote by Free
Learn your chords first and foremost.

Get your rhythm and timing sorted.

Try as many different chord progressions and strum patterns as you can.

Learn Barre chords.

Learn scales to help with lead playing and improvisation.

Most of all, have fun.


...see, no idea what you are talking about. If you have the time to help a beginner out, then please take this time on this beginner.
#7
What open chords do you know?

Can you play them fluently etc?
#10
Quote by DeathMetal18
get lessons

Try reading the original thread, then come back and TRY to be helpful.
#11
I can't get lessons.
If you would've read what I posted, you would know everyone that teaches, lives far away from me.
By far away, I mean at least 2-3 hours.
#12
Quote by DarkSithLord
I've looked at stuff like this, but it all sounds like mumbo-jumbo to me. I can't understand a bit of it....I can't help I'm a newbie at this.

No problem mate.

I struggled to understand scales but happily everything just sort of 'clicked'.

Basically, a scale is a series of notes that sound good together. It's more complicated than that but I'm trying to make it a little easier for you.

If you remember elementary stuff like Doh Ray Mi Fa So Lah Te Do, well thats a scale.

This may help to explain better than I can.

CLICK
#13
Quote by Free
No problem mate.

I struggled to understand scales but happily everything just sort of 'clicked'.

Basically, a scale is a series of notes that sound good together. It's more complicated than that but I'm trying to make it a little easier for you.

If you remember elementary stuff like Doh Ray Mi Fa So Lah Te Do, well thats a scale.

This may help to explain better than I can.

CLICK


I looked at it but it still mentions things which I have no idea what they mean such as: Pentatonic, Octave, and all of those letters.
#14
Pentatonic simply means the scale is made up of 5 notes. From the greek (pente) I believe.

And if you play the E string open (either one) and then play the same string while fretting (holding the string down) at the 12th fret, it's the same note but an Octave higher.

I'd suggest you start with the chromatic scale.

You didn't say if you had all the open chords sorted or not?
#17
haha...sorry, than I have NO clue.
Sorry if I'm stressin' ya out.
I've been looking everywhere for lessons and I just can't find any anywhere.
I live in Fountain, Colorado, in the US
#19
cheer up. you've only been playing for 4 months. you'll get better. try a variety of power chorch shapes. any 3 string chord is a power chord.
what
#20
Quote by IamJonsCranium
any 3 string chord is a power chord.

eh?
#22
Yeah sorry, your original comment confused me, thought you were talking about open chord construction for a moment.

Off to bed for me I think. night night.
#23
^^ Not true. Power chords aren't chords at all--they're an interval. A fifth to be precise. Not all three string chords are power chords. If there is a third (whether minor or major) in the chord, it ceases to be a power chord. That's why power chords are written C5, A5 etc.
Sorry to snipe, but this guy's problem is theory, so if we confuse him now, he'll have a tougher time later.

EDIT: More help. Here's an example:

C major scale--C D E F G A B C (C major is easy because there are no sharps or flats)

C major chord = 1st, 3rd, and fifth. C, E, G is a C major chord.

For a minor, you just flatten the third by a half-step.

C Minor chord = 1st, minor 3rd, 5th. C, D#, G is a C minor chord.

You probably don't need this volume of detail right now, but I would say learn your open chords and learn a little about chord construction while your hands are getting used to their new tasks. Then learn barre chords and while your hands get accustomed to those, try learning a little about melody and scales. Once you can strum (rythym is very important too, don't forget about that) spend a little more time on scales and soloing--accurate bends, vibrato, etc. You'll be on your way in no time. It's just takes practice and effort. Good luck to you.
Last edited by schitz at May 15, 2006,
#24
Thanks for all the help Free.
One thing though...where can I find the whole fretboard like this:

|--F--|--F#-|--G--|--G#-|--A--|--Bb-|--B--|--C-|--Cb-|--D--|--D#-|--E--|

It seems to me, like this would be much easier to learn.....I could memorize this no problem.
#25
Quote by DarkSithLord
Thanks for all the help Free.
One thing though...where can I find the whole fretboard like this:

|--F--|--F#-|--G--|--G#-|--A--|--Bb-|--B--|--C-|--Cb-|--D--|--D#-|--E--|

It seems to me, like this would be much easier to learn.....I could memorize this no problem.



OK, here's an easy way. There is no sharp or flat between B and C, and none between E and F. Everything else has a sharp/flat between them (those are the same note--they are enharmonic). For instance, D sharp and E flat are the same note. So if you have seven notes (ABCDEFG) and two of them don't have a sharp/flat between them, that leaves you with 12 total functional notes. So if you try and say (out loud) each note as you play it between the open string and the 12th fret, you'll cover every note on every string in no time. Do that enough times and you'll have it memorized.
#28
Quote by DarkSithLord
which is flat and which is sharp?


How can I put this.....hmm.

OK, if you want to look at the note between, say, an A and a B, you are moving up in pitch. Pluck your A string (it's the one second closest to your chest when you hold your guitar--sorry, I don't know exactly how much you know yet). That's an A. Now press down on the same string in the second fret--that's a B. It gets higher, hence you are moving up in pitch--that means the sound is getting "sharper." Now play the note on the first fret--that note has two names. It's either A sharp (because you had to move up in pitch, or "sharpen" the note to get to that first fret note from the open A), or B flat (because you had to move down in pitch, or "flatten" the note to get to that sound from the B that you played earlier). For music theory, there is a reason that we give these types of notes two different names (I think it has something to do with modes being diatonic, so you have to use ABCDEF and G at least once when naming all the notes or something, but I'm not really all that sure--not that important for you right now). You cna write it out on a sheet of paper if you want but I'll give you the chromatic scale (ascending version):

A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A
#29
Sorry if that seems really oversimplified, but I'm not sure from what level you're starting. I started guitar very late in life, but I had played other instruments (violin, bass, etc) since I was really young, so I knew most of the basics.

Also sorry for double post, but my computer hangs whenever I try to edit and old post to add something.
#30
So what's the difference between A and A#?
If you have some kind messenger, this would be so much easier.....

Oh, and there is no way to oversimplify when it comes to me playing guitar...haha
Last edited by DarkSithLord at May 15, 2006,
#31
I don't use a messenger man, sorry. I'm usually on a computer all day at work, so I don't normally have any inclination to do computer-ish stuff when I get home, aside from visiting this place.

The difference between A and A# is called a half-step. Think of it like this--if you play an open string and then you press down on the string between the nut and the first fret, you've moved the sound up a half-step (it's also called a half-tone by some people--different name for the same thing).

Here's one thing I would say regarding theory--you're doing the right thing by asking as many questions as you are, but ultimately if you follow all of this back by asking why, you're going to end up with a very unsatisfactory answer. Because really, what it comes down to is some long dead white people a long time ago had to come up with names for things so that they could talk about music, so they all just agreed on a construct to make it easier to communicate. You've worked your way back to the true basic--what is a note, tone, step, etc. That's good. At this point you want to concentrate on memorization. The comprehension will come a little later once you've gotten used to the way that musicians talk. Music has its own language. Once you know the basics, it will make learning a lot easier.
#32
Alright, I'm so sorry for this...but I need it all at once, so I don't have to keep referring back to everything....so explain the "basics" to me one more time, all at once...as simple as you can get it...and I'll memorize it.
I'm serious about learning all of this...so trust me, your time isn't going to waste.

#33
If you learned how to read music on a staff, it would be much easier to grasp this stuff, but music theory can be hard anyway. so, i'll go over the staff, the staff depicts the notes you should play and looks like This but that's a rather difficult song so don't let that scare you. The notes for the Music Staff look like this:

----------------------------------------------F----------------------------------------
                                       E
----------------------------------D----------------------------------------------------
                              C
------------------------B--------------------------------------------------------------
                   A
-------------G-------------------------------------------------------------------------
          F
----E----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The ones on the line can easily be remembered as
Every
Good
Boy
Does
Fine
and the ones in the spaces can be remembered as "FACE in the space".
dome Beginners Guitar Books will help in this matter.


EDIT: also, guitar Music always has a treble clef which looks like this (it's only the first swirley thing, the rest are notes)


EDIT2!!!: I figured i might as well cover this as well. . .

Ledger Lines: they are the lines that extend beyond the Musical staff.
that note is on a the third lefger line above the staff.

Notes: There are many notes, whole notes(4 beats) half notes(two beats) quarter notes(one beat) eigth notes(1/2 beat) and those keep geting smaller.They look like this(whole note at the top and sixteenth notes at the bottom)

Time Signature: Time signature is very important, it tells how many beats per measure and which note gets one beat, the most common Time signature is 4/4 also known as common time and can look like this:
or this.
Last edited by R0CKER1220 at May 15, 2006,
#35
OK. There are spaces between notes. As you progress, you'll find that the spaces between the notes matter a lot more than the notes themselves, but that's neither here nor there.

Musicians measure the space between notes in steps and half-steps (or tones and semi-tones, if you prefer). Most whole notes (A, B, C, D, E, F, G are all called whole notes--neither sharp nor flat) have a whole step between them. In other words, moving from C to an E chromatically looks like this:

C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb

The notes that have a slash between them are called enharmonic notes--they are the exact same note, but music theorists have given them two different names.

Twenty second time-out: the "#" means sharp, and the "b" means flat--you'll never see an actual "b" next to a note if you read music, but the symbol looks a lot like a "b" so that's what I'm using here. Therefor, C# is C sharp. Db is D flat. Those two are the same note, but it has two different names.

The entire chromatic scale looks like (remember, no enharmonic notes between B and c, or E and F):

A, A#/Bb, B, C, C#/Db, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A

Those are the only twelve notes in Western music. You can get sounds that aren't useful by bending, but it will sound like a cat getting humped by a buffalo. Not good.

Here's a bonus for you--major scale construction. All major scales follow the exact same pattern. You play the root note, then you play the note that's a whooe step away, then another whole step away, then a half step, then a whole step, then another whole step, one more whole step, a half step, and you're done.

Take the chromatic scale above. We're going to start with C in order to make it easiest, ok?

C--root
C#/Db--skip
D--this is a whole tone away from the root, so it's within the scale
D#/Eb--skip
E--whole step from the last note we played so it's in too
F--rememer this is our first half step, so this note is in too
F#/Gb--skip
G--whole tone away from F so it's played
G#/Ab--skip
A--whole tone from G so it's played
A#/Bb--skip
B--whole tone from A so we play it
C--half tone, and we're back at C

So the pattern is whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half. Whatever note you start with, if you follow that pattern (remember, the spaces between the notes matter more than the notes themselves) you will play a major scale. Wow, I really hope my computer doesn't hang when I try to post this. That was a lot of typing.
#36
Thank you so much everyone.
You've helped a lot.
Now, I just have to memorize all of this....*sigh* haha.
#37
-.- Power Chords aren't JUST 3 strings. They can consist of 2 or 3, but not just any variation, it's the Root + 5th + (Root) the second root being optional and an octave higher than the first.

I too have been playing since January and I think I'm pretty skilled already, so like if you want me to teach you and you have Yahoo I can help you out a bit, I'm not to technical because I'm not that great yet either, but let me know!
#39
Quote by SilentDeftone
^ Power chords can consist of 6 or 5 or 4 strings too.

-SD


Emm, see I haven't learned that yet, but would that be a barre chord? Because I noticed Major barre chord forms have a power chord at the bottom, so are they just barres?
#40
Barre chords get their name because of the need for the index finger to barre across more than one string. Think of your index finger like a capo.

It's a good observation that you've made though. In that when playing a barre chord if you were to only play the first two strings then that would be a power chord. Now that you know that you can mix up your strumming to include the different voicings etc and add some dynamics (for want of a better word) to the chord.

Try mixing the strumming from the high strings to the low strings. It can work very well.
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