#2
if you think you don't need one it can be either of 2 things


1. you are content with being mediocre
2. you are really underestimating the level of proficiency possible on the instrument itself.


when people major in music, its basically 4 years of private lessons, playing in groups and practicing.


if you want to improve, you'll get a guitar teacher. Try to find at least 4-5 guys and pick the one who will help you the most
#3
Have you gotten a grasp of sweep picking ? or string skipping?

Posted by Smokey Amp

OMFGZ!!!1!! PUNK_DUDE2005 IS LIKE, THE SAVIOUR OF MANKIND! HE'S LIKE THE FIRST THING ON MY MINd WHEN I WAKE UP AND THE LAST THING ON MY MIND BEFORE I SLEEP. SOMETIMES I THINK ABOUT HIM IN MY "PRIVATE REFLECTION TIME"..UH HUM..
#4
well if you've learned every technique there is on guitar, you should be a teacher. I'd just work on refining those skills and developing your own style.
#5
If you don't know your theory, get a teacher, cause theory is really reall important
Originally Posted by jajp001
White man came (Cumming noise)
Across the sea (Wow!!!)
Brought us pain (Right in the eye, it was)
And misery ( Points to pregnant sister)
Run to the hills, iron maiden
#7
Quote by Unforgivable
yeah they come pretty easy to me now


Ok that means your on the right way then

Learn some new scales and theory , it will help you get creative

Posted by Smokey Amp

OMFGZ!!!1!! PUNK_DUDE2005 IS LIKE, THE SAVIOUR OF MANKIND! HE'S LIKE THE FIRST THING ON MY MINd WHEN I WAKE UP AND THE LAST THING ON MY MIND BEFORE I SLEEP. SOMETIMES I THINK ABOUT HIM IN MY "PRIVATE REFLECTION TIME"..UH HUM..
#8
it definately can't hurt, i'm going to get a guitar teacher (which may take weeks to find someone i'm content w/ as the last several teachers i've had i ended up giving them lessons) and i've been playing for 10 years but i know i'm still nowhere near where i want to be (although i get compliments all the time, i can hear where my problems are) so it definately can't hurt and you'll be surprised what you might learn from someone else.
#9
Yeah you could always learn something new... I don't know how you sound like or how you play, but if you feel you need some more lessons are you haven't advanced enough, try to find a teacher that can teach at your level, no beginner stuff.

But, if I were you...
since you can play any song with major ease, just stop learning more techniques and start learning more songs.

Practice involvements in a band even, you can learn things you'll never learn from a book or teacher... it's complicated but you can get experience.. it's hard to explain but joining a group really increases your play.
"1456"... if you're reading this, you know what the code means, and i mean every word of it.... 1456!!!
#10
It comes to a question of how much you want to be classically trained. Adam Jones of the LA Based band Tool claimed he never had a guitar lesson, but his style is incredibly strong. He is by no means an Yngwie malmsteen, but Tool still plays in front of crowds of well over 2000 people who enjoy their music. I'm willing to bet that what you can learn from a teacher you can probably find out for yourself. That's a great way to adopt your own, personal style. Let your own mind read and learn for itself, rather than paying someone else to tell you what they know.
#11
two years ago i started taking lessons. i had alot of knowledge already and wasnt sure if lessons were for me. the thing is, unless your the next joe satriani, theres always someone out there thats better then you, so you might as well learn from one of them.
#12
Take an occassional lesson so a teacher can point out fingering/positional problems. I took many lessons on guitar and none on drums when i was a kid. Now i find i have big holes in my drum knowledge and am good at most guitar aspects BUT now i prefer playing drums to guitar (maybe too many lessons/practising can be a bad thing for your love of guitar!)
#13
Yeah, theory is superfly important, it's the foundation of songwriting...
LydiaLydia
#14
If you get a teacher, please, please give him/her a clear idea of where you are on the guitar. It saves a lot of frustration learning things you've already learned and the teacher teaching a bored person.

Even if you have a teacher, have a good grasp on theory requires discipline and a little bit of studying. Try picking up a theory book and see if you have the patience to learn. If you don't then a teacher is useless to you and enjoy mediocrity. >_<
#15
I would like to state that deciding whether or not you need or even want a teacher is a complex situation where you have to consider many sides.

Keep this in mind. You can improve and be above mediocre without a teacher. Infact I would have never gotten to the point technically where I am with the teacher I had. The one I once had taught me poor picking technique.

People say "get a teacher or you'll pick up bad habits!" Fact of the matter is, if you get a teacher (chances are) you'll pick up his bad habits and make them your own.

You can learn anything a teacher can teach you by yourself, either with books videos, analyzing your technique etc.

In favor of teachers, if you do happen to get a very good one by luck or recommendation, he/she can teach you more in 5 minutes then you could in a week by yourself. (only if the teacher is VERY good, there are tons of mediocre teachers running about)

Ask yourself this question. Do I need direction in my playing/practicing? If the answer is yes, get a teacher. If the answer is no, well then...you don't NEED one (but don't disregard getting one).

You also have to take in account is your past musical expirence? Ever gotten lessons for piano or some other stringed insturment? Chances are you can teach yourself much more effectively if you have.

Having any grasp of theory requires study and memorization for it to be useful, the only thing a teacher can do for you that a book can't do is play you examples, but if its a good theory book it'll have examples notated to play on piano. (easiest to learn theory on as you can "see" what you are doing quite easily)

On a side note do not take everything I say as 100% truth, there is always exceptions, there are extraordinary teachers out there, but they are rare.


BTW I thought I would just mention that the way theory is overrated by guitarists is ridiculous. Theory is important and an extremely useful tool (it should not be disregarded), but a lot of people I know (and on this board) have it up on some sort of pedestal.

EDIT --> And if you want my opinion on whether I think you need one or not (from that one post) I think you do.
Last edited by Erc at May 18, 2006,
#16
teachers are good...........you dont absolutely need one but it definantly helps........theory is also very important
#17
[i teach and notice pupils with really bad guitar technique all the time with affect playing and can cause physical injury.

Simple rules like dont be tense, drop your fret hand wrist and keep the guitar straight and use all left hand fingers sound basic but these are common fundimental problems. These rules can save you $$$ if you play in front of a mirror and analyse yourself.


QUOTE=Erc]I would like to state that deciding whether or not you need or even want a teacher is a complex situation where you have to consider many sides.

Keep this in mind. You can improve and be above mediocre without a teacher. Infact I would have never gotten to the point technically where I am with the teacher I had. The one I once had taught me poor picking technique.

People say "get a teacher or you'll pick up bad habits!" Fact of the matter is, if you get a teacher (chances are) you'll pick up his bad habits and make them your own.

You can learn anything a teacher can teach you by yourself, either with books videos, analyzing your technique etc.

In favor of teachers, if you do happen to get a very good one by luck or recommendation, he/she can teach you more in 5 minutes then you could in a week by yourself. (only if the teacher is VERY good, there are tons of mediocre teachers running about)

Ask yourself this question. Do I need direction in my playing/practicing? If the answer is yes, get a teacher. If the answer is no, well then...you don't NEED one (but don't disregard getting one).

You also have to take in account is your past musical expirence? Ever gotten lessons for piano or some other stringed insturment? Chances are you can teach yourself much more effectively if you have.

Having any grasp of theory requires study and memorization for it to be useful, the only thing a teacher can do for you that a book can't do is play you examples, but if its a good theory book it'll have examples notated to play on piano. (easiest to learn theory on as you can "see" what you are doing quite easily)

On a side note do not take everything I say as 100% truth, there is always exceptions, there are extraordinary teachers out there, but they are rare.


BTW I thought I would just mention that the way theory is overrated by guitarists is ridiculous. Theory is important and an extremely useful tool (it should not be disregarded), but a lot of people I know (and on this board) have it up on some sort of pedestal.

EDIT --> And if you want my opinion on whether I think you need one or not (from that one post) I think you do.
#18
I think every person is different. Some people need teachers, some people don't. I think I'm one of those that don't. I wanted to take lessons when I first started out, but I had no idea where to go to get them (lived in a very small town). So I pretty much told myself that the lack of a teacher was not going to stop me from learning this instrument.

Fast forward to now...
I'm at a point in my playing where I really don't see what a teacher could help me with. I know enough theory and I'm technically good enough to write original songs, and that's ALL I'm concerned with. That's the goal I set for myself when I first picked up a guitar and that's exactly what I'm now able to do. That doesn't mean that I don't practice new technique or read up on theory because I do both of those all the time. I know exactly what I'm weak at, so I know exactly what I need to improve... and I'm constantly working at it. But I'm not afraid of being mediocre. I don't have the mindset that I have to be better than this or that guitarist... I'm just working so that I can get the tools that'll let me get the music out that I hear in my head.

And lessons are, what..? 30 minutes a week? That's insane to me. I play for hours everyday. Besides, I'm having fun with my guitar playing right now, and isn't that what it's all about? It's so much fun when I sit down with my guitar and just experiment until I discover something new, even if it's something a teacher could've showed me in 25 minutes. I love reading about music theory and experimenting with it by applying it to my songs and hearing how they turn out. That's SO much fun to me. I dunno... maybe I'm weird.

But to answer your question--Do you need a teacher? I don't know. It depends on where you want to go as a player. At this point, if you're as good as you say you are, I'd reccomend you just learn some theory so you can see how stuff works, then start writing your own songs.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light