#1
what would be the best sounding wood (body) to strengthen big open and barre chords. goin for that huge, warm, feel-good tone. AFI's sound (the guitar at least) is what im lookin for. contributions anyone?
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#4
There is no such thing as "the best" but some tonewoods lend themselves to certain applications better than others.

Mahogany is a dark tone
Swamp ash is a warm tone
Basswood is somewhere in the middle
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#5
Mahogany - Gives you that dark sound, more bassy, very good for metal
Basswood - More middy and not so bassy, for for shredding and fast licks
Alder - Good highs and will reveal notes even more, striking tones

As for good tone, frets also needs to be considered, medium frets is said to have good strumming properties (chording and rythm) as it is closer to the fretboard whereas jumbos are better for fast licks because notes are easier to fret and the fretwires are further compared to medium.

Also, there are a lot of things that affect sound such as pickups, amps, effects, so you need to consider that also.
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#6
I can't verify this because I won't be starting my own guitar made with it until the summer, however I've been told that Teak gives a tone somewhere between Basswood and Mahogany if it's of any help.
#7
i forgot to say that its a gretcsh semi-holow body
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


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#8
Quote by madpickin03
Mahogany - Gives you that dark sound, more bassy, very good for metal
Basswood - More middy and not so bassy, for for shredding and fast licks
Alder - Good highs and will reveal notes even more, striking tones

As for good tone, frets also needs to be considered, medium frets is said to have good strumming properties (chording and rythm) as it is closer to the fretboard whereas jumbos are better for fast licks because notes are easier to fret and the fretwires are further compared to medium.

Also, there are a lot of things that affect sound such as pickups, amps, effects, so you need to consider that also.


AFAIK, fret size doesn't change tone at all (only material). And even if it is, it wouldn't be significant enough to be noticeable.
#9
Also, there's Ash. Swamp Ash, which grows partially underwater, is a lightweight wood with high stiffness (for high sound velocity), famous for its mid-range snarl and biting response. I understand it handles complex frequencies that Alder doesn't. TTT for experts.
#10
Quote by Panasonic3
i forgot to say that its a gretcsh semi-holow body


Well then it's going to be laminated mapler or laminated walnut. Walnut is going to give you a warmer tone that the maple.
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#11
Quote by mr_hankey
AFAIK, fret size doesn't change tone at all (only material). And even if it is, it wouldn't be significant enough to be noticeable.

It wont change significantly yes, but it has its own properties that separates it from jumbos and smalls, like good for chording and rythm. A guitar teacher told me this.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
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