#1
me and a couple friends recently started a band and had our first practice the other day. it was pretty good, but our guitar and bass amps aren't loud enough to be heard over the drums. my guitar amp is 25 watts solid state and i think our bass amp is about 25 watts, too. i can barely hear my self play and i can kinda hear the bass. how loud do you suggest we should go when getting our next amps?
#2
at least 60 watt tube, tube amps are louder than solid state (lotsa technical jargon in that but trust me, they are) i have a 400 watt crate solid state and it is right at perfect (actually its a little bit louder than i need) but a friend of mine had a single speaker 50 watt tube amp and it was just barely loud enough to be heard over the drums when he cranked it, so i recommend at least 60 watts tube, if yer dead set on solid state i would say at least 120 watts
#3
You would probably want to stay 50 watts+ for a SS combo and higher, 75-100w, for your bass player. Of course your PA system, size and acoustics of your rehearsal space and drummers playing habits have everything to do with it too.
I'd rather play too loud than too lite.
#4
^x2 Wow, what a load of bull****.

My 15watt ga-15rv can keep up with a drummer easy.

50 watt is EXTREMELY loud. It is impossible to get the tubes cranked at a useable volume without an attenuator.

15-30watts tube is a good place to start if you are a bedroom and small gig player.
#5
wow, man not to be talkin smack but like 30 watts is no way loud enough for a gig (not even a small one assuming you want the people in the back to be able to hear you) my first amp was a 50 watt solid state and it wasn't nearly as loud as my friends 50 watt tube, and was totally over powered by the drums...... metallicafan, seriously, i've been doing this for while now, demeas got it closer on, you want it too loud instead of too soft (unless yer playing easy listening jazz which w/ a name like metallica fan i'm guessing not) you want to turn your amp up about halfway and have it be loud enough to be heard w/ the drums, all amps between 1/2 and 3/4 of the way when cranked, start to distort and can destroy the speaker (this is how i destroyed my first 50 watt solid state amp) do a little bit of realistic research instead of just trusting people here on a web site (one thing i failed to mention though was the speaker size, ohm and wattage pushed on all these, if your wattage is say 50 watts tube but its got a 6 ohm output through 2 8" speakers would be probably be more than adequate, my friends had a 4 ohm output through a single 12" speaker and was just loud enough to mix w/ the drums w/out being over powered) again, as i said do some research
#6
Quote by Erc
^x2 Wow, what a load of bull****.

My 15watt ga-15rv can keep up with a drummer easy.

50 watt is EXTREMELY loud. It is impossible to get the tubes cranked at a useable volume without an attenuator.

15-30watts tube is a good place to start if you are a bedroom and small gig player.


and to let you know,fyi, this is total BS, i had an ampeg 200 watt tube head thru a 4 x 12" cab (ampeg) that didn't have an attenuator and the sound was more than adequately warm and cranked.
#7
Lol, z4twenny is full of lies and crap, its hilarious.

My old Fender Frontman 25 watt solid state amp could overpower anything my drummer could do at 5.5 volume with gain at about 7. Sure, it was really staticy (only cost $150) but it worked. With my 50 watt tube amp, if I cranked it all the way on the clean channel, I'd probably go deaf. I have to use an attenuator and an overdrive pedal to get a reasonabley sounding distorion on my 50 watt tube amp lol, even when I'm doing gigs.

Seriously, unless your doing major venues and gigs, 50 watt is more than enough. Not to mention you can hook a cab up to most valve amps, lol.
#8
Quote by Sid Watts
Lol, z4twenny is full of lies and crap, its hilarious.

My old Fender Frontman 25 watt solid state amp could overpower anything my drummer could do at 5.5 volume with gain at about 7. Sure, it was really staticy (only cost $150) but it worked. With my 50 watt tube amp, if I cranked it all the way on the clean channel, I'd probably go deaf. I have to use an attenuator and an overdrive pedal to get a reasonabley sounding distorion on my 50 watt tube amp lol, even when I'm doing gigs.

Seriously, unless your doing major venues and gigs, 50 watt is more than enough. Not to mention you can hook a cab up to most valve amps, lol.


i use that same fender you were talking about. it's not loud enough for us, though. our drummer has a really big set and he's loud. we're not doing gigs yet, so how would a 50 watt tube amp be? like a peavey valveking 112, cuz i've been wanting one of those for a while.
Last edited by metallicafan180 at May 17, 2006,
#9
do a little bit of realistic research instead of just trusting people here on a web site (one thing i failed to mention though was the speaker size, ohm and wattage pushed on all these, if your wattage is say 50 watts tube but its got a 6 ohm output through 2 8" speakers would be probably be more than adequate, my friends had a 4 ohm output through a single 12" speaker and was just loud enough to mix w/ the drums w/out being over powered) again, as i said do some research


First off, I build amplifiers as a hobby, so I think my opinion is worth more weight then you. Who is more than likely, someone who has never played a 100watt tube amp cranked or partially deaf. 2nd, Impedence does not effect speaker output with a tube amp. With a solid state is does.

The more speakers there are the more air that is being pushed, so the sound is "percieved" louder, while not actually being any louder then before (db wise)

What effects volume and output the most is infact the speakers sensitivity rating. Amps double in power by multiples of 10.

a 100watts twice as loud as 10 watts. 1000 watts is twice as loud as 100watts, and the difference between 100watts and 50watts both loaded with the same speakers is around roughly 12%.

A guy from a forum I go to took a measurement of the db rating of his 35watt amp cranked (without clipping). It was 117db, 3db less then an airplane landing.
#10
Wow, Erc just owned everybody.

I'd say 50 watts solid state is plenty. My amp is 60 and I'm fine.
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#11
Kk, personally i think it has to do with where you are playing and WHAT you are playing. When i play in my friend's barn I cant hear a thing over the drums. Outside, however, i can hear alot better, i think it has to do with the echoing. I have a 50watt, uts aight, but not the best
#12
Quote by metallicafan180
i use that same fender you were talking about. it's not loud enough for us, though. our drummer has a really big set and he's loud. we're not doing gigs yet, so how would a 50 watt tube amp be? like a peavey valveking 112, cuz i've been wanting one of those for a while.


Yeah, I have the Valveking and it's great. Sounds much better than the Fender. I suppose if your drummer is really loud than it wouldn't be enough, but my drummer has only been playing for 2 years and has a crap five piece set.

But seriously, 400 watt is fricken' overkill. Pete Townshend used 100 watts tube power on stage and Jimmy page used 200 watts tube power live. And they played in venues with 50,000+ people. Like I said, 50 watt tube/solid state will work fine. You could probably even get away with less.

Never buy an amp, especially a solid state, just because of its wattage. Keep that in mind. Don't let a $300, 150 watt amp tempt you over a $450, 50 watt tube amp. Quality is as important as loudness.
#13
Quote by Erc
First off, I build amplifiers as a hobby, so I think my opinion is worth more weight then you. Who is more than likely, someone who has never played a 100watt tube amp cranked or partially deaf. 2nd, Impedence does not effect speaker output with a tube amp. With a solid state is does.

The more speakers there are the more air that is being pushed, so the sound is "percieved" louder, while not actually being any louder then before (db wise)

What effects volume and output the most is infact the speakers sensitivity rating. Amps double in power by multiples of 10.

a 100watts twice as loud as 10 watts. 1000 watts is twice as loud as 100watts, and the difference between 100watts and 50watts both loaded with the same speakers is around roughly 12%.

A guy from a forum I go to took a measurement of the db rating of his 35watt amp cranked (without clipping). It was 117db, 3db less then an airplane landing.


Why the **** do amps need to be that loud?
#15
Holy ****, z4 is so full of crap

I build amps too, I side with erc


Most tube fifteen watters can be heard over a drummer...there is still variation in speaker efficiency, etc. though. 30 watts will work for your small-med gigs. Keep in mind the issue of headroom though, if you crank a tube, it will distort, even on the clean channel. Somehow people don't realize that. Try at least 50 watts for bass, probably more. Bass needs more power because of the low frequencies.
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#16
Quote by Sid Watts
Yeah, I have the Valveking and it's great. Sounds much better than the Fender. I suppose if your drummer is really loud than it wouldn't be enough, but my drummer has only been playing for 2 years and has a crap five piece set.


my drummer has some massive Tama double bass kit that his dad used back in the day. he's only been playing for about a year, but he's really good. and yeah, valvekings are great.