#1
Well, I am just curious, I know the keys of the frets, but only if I start at the first fret and go down, but I'm working on it. My question is, why is this essential, at some point can I get rid of the whole scale boxes and just play the notes? How will I know what notes to play, and what not? Everyone says to learn the notes of the fretboard, I'm just curious how exactly it will come in handy.
#2
ermm..i dont know them, i just know where to play
your hands fall into the right place after a while

i had no teacher..so my theory is kinda crap
but...if you want to skip the theory
just play scales and get used to them
It's Chico Time
#3
well if you know ur scales u will know which notes are in which key, so when know all the notes on the fret board u dont have to rely on box shapes because you can find any note in the scale ranging acrss the fret board
#4
Quote by zxBane
Well, I am just curious, I know the keys of the frets, but only if I start at the first fret and go down, but I'm working on it. My question is, why is this essential, at some point can I get rid of the whole scale boxes and just play the notes? How will I know what notes to play, and what not? Everyone says to learn the notes of the fretboard, I'm just curious how exactly it will come in handy.


Well, for improvisation, memorizing the entire fretboard note names is really
pretty unnecessary. I doubt anyone thinks "I'm on A now and next I want to
play a B..." You have no time for thinking like that. I sure don't think that way
amd mostly I improvise.

First learn the positions or "boxes". That will give you a pattern of the entire
fretboard for a given scale and give you basic finger training.

With this, you'll be able to begin to improvise, but your access to the scales will
still be very linear and you'll still be thinking in terms of "boxes". If you try
to move around much you'll get "lost"easily.

The next step is to expand your scale practice to patterns that move across
boxes. This will help you see the connections that run through boxes in the
middle and all which ways rather than always having to figure it out from
start of the box position.

Finally, there are some good methods that help you "see" the scales as a regularly
repeating pattern accross and up and down the fretboard. They really help
you to move from anywhere to anywhere on the fretboard without getting lost
so easily. Basically they use "landmarks". The GuitarGrid Method is one such
method.

So, you combine all that stuff and after a while your improvising begins flowing
outside the boxes all up and down the neck immediately connecting boxes
and you can go anywhere.

Finally, while it's not necessary to know note names, it's VERY important to know
where relative scale degrees are at all times. Most importantly the root note.
#5
Quote by zxBane
My question is, why is this essential, at some point can I get rid of the whole scale boxes and just play the notes?


Yep. This is what you want to aim for, ulimately.

How will I know what notes to play, and what not?


Your ears will tell you. Just play, play, play. Get the sounds of different scales and note combinations in your head and one day you'll hear what a song calls for and you'll just play it without thinking.