#1
Not sure if this is the right forum for this but it seems the best place to find people who could help me out. Im trying to do the whole career picking thing these days and am strongly considering going into guitar teaching or maybe teaching muisic in a school.

The thing is im kinda clueless as to the best way to go about this. So if theres any teachers out there who could tell me how they did it, and if its hard to make a living out of it(people keep telling me it is) id very much appreciate it. especially if you did this in Ireland!

Thanks a squillion
#3
I teach guitar to a few of my friends.

the way i went about it was just going over to their house with their set-up and taught them the basics... (names of notes, how to hold a pick, etc) then advanced to beginner (fretting, small scale/efgabcdefgabcdefg) then progress to a few simple songs, then get into chords, then power chords, then some more songs, then scales, then effects, then songs, then soloing, then songs.

im not certified but you need to go to collage and get a degree in music theory and something else. I would advise going to Burkley Collage of Music in Boston.
#4
unfortunately most (not all but most) people who have degrees in music don't make too much $$$ if they can even apply their degree somewhere, a guitar teacher needs to be able to teach about every possible style of guitar effictively and efficiently (jazz/rock/classical/reggae,blues/spanish/flamenco/rock/country etc etc etc), not only do you need to be able to know about music but you need good communication skills so you can convey the info to your students in a manner that newbs can understand, as for becoming a guitar teacher and making $$$ doing it, the best thing you can do is learn music theory and the likes through college and once you get yer knowledge down your best prospects are advertising through word of mouth and a little advertising, i teach others guitar for fun (not $$$) and am looking forward to teaching a friend of mines daughter soon and your knowledge and experience will show to others when they ask you about it (careful not to be too pompous though) and initially you will probably want to teach 10 - 20 people for free just to prove that you have the ability to make it worth paying for. these are my suggestions.... anyone else?
#5
You don't need a degree. You just need to know -

1) How to play;
2) Enough theory to be able to explain why music works; and
3) How to teach.

I got started by advertising. Then my students told their friends and soon I was knocking back new students coz I was booked solid.
#6
Quote by ban rap
You don't need a degree. You just need to know -

1) How to play;
2) Enough theory to be able to explain why music works; and
3) How to teach.

I got started by advertising. Then my students told their friends and soon I was knocking back new students coz I was booked solid.


yes you do need a degree. All of the music teachers in schools have Degrees. so are you going to tell me that it is just a coinsidense?
#8
Quote by ban rap
You don't need a degree. You just need to know -

1) How to play;
2) Enough theory to be able to explain why music works; and
3) How to teach.

I got started by advertising. Then my students told their friends and soon I was knocking back new students coz I was booked solid.


you don't technically need a degree, however you do need to have that level of knowledge, what happens when a student comes to you wanting to know some theory that you don't know because all you do is teach beginners? this type of mindset is what irks me b/c i'm looking for a teacher who knows more than me and there are tons of people around here that play and have some knowledge but not to the degree that i need..... it's better to know to much and not need it than to not know enough and need it.....
#9
Quote by z4twenny
you don't technically need a degree, however you do need to have that level of knowledge, what happens when a student comes to you wanting to know some theory that you don't know because all you do is teach beginners? this type of mindset is what irks me b/c i'm looking for a teacher who knows more than me and there are tons of people around here that play and have some knowledge but not to the degree that i need..... it's better to know to much and not need it than to not know enough and need it.....
You do indeed need a degree to teach in the school system, at least here in the U.S. If you want to teach in the elementary and/or secondary school system you'll need both a music degree and an education degree. If you want to teach at the college level you'll need at least a Master's degree, but my research leads me to believe that only music Ph.Ds are actually finding college teaching positions.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#10
Yeah, there's only a couple teachers at my school that don't have their PhD's. But they've all been playing professionally for years and years. And a couple of the private instructor's were only working there part-time so they could get their PhD's. That's at the college/university level of course. The level of education you have completely determines where you'll be able to teach. If you don't want a degree, you can still put your name in the paper and offer private lessons. Doubtful that you'd make a living. I'm sure people can but it's probably not easy. z4twenny said it best..."it's better to know to much and not need it than to not know enough and need it....."
#11
Heh.

1) I'm not in the US. I don't need a degree.
2) I've learnt university-level theory. I just got the books and such and taught myself. It was a lot faster that way. If you want to learn something, then learn it. You don't have to go to school to learn everything. University is for people who can't think for themselves.
#13
Quote by S!lent-Feel!ng
I would advise going to Burkley Collage of Music in Boston.
That's like saying to an aspiring engineer, "I would advise going to MIT."
#14
Quote by ban rap

2) I've learnt university-level theory. I just got the books and such and taught myself. It was a lot faster that way. If you want to learn something, then learn it. You don't have to go to school to learn everything. University is for people who can't think for themselves.


Are we talking "jazz" or "classical" theory? Could you write me a fugue?

Excuse me if i sound skeptical, but i have personally found that a lotta people think that knowing ABOUT uni level theory is KNOWING uni level theory.

Alright, you should really do a coupla diplomas, that way you are qualified to the eyeballs for private guitar tuition. I really reccomend doing a few diplomas in music theory, because the different boards are used by different schools and you get pupils doing this and that and parents wanting this and that.

And obviously, do an RGT diploma. I havent found any other electric guitar qualifications which go to diploma (music college waster schools excepted) - its hard enough to take seriously.

Good luck. And you have to be 18 to do the RGT diploma btw, what age are you? Where are you?
#15
Quote by z4twenny
you don't technically need a degree, however you do need to have that level of knowledge, what happens when a student comes to you wanting to know some theory that you don't know because all you do is teach beginners? this type of mindset is what irks me b/c i'm looking for a teacher who knows more than me and there are tons of people around here that play and have some knowledge but not to the degree that i need..... it's better to know to much and not need it than to not know enough and need it.....

Being able to play does not mean being able to teach! There are people on this forum who claim to be music teachers; the only person that I have encountered here up to to now who I would recognise as a truly qualified Music Teacher is gpb0216.
I took my music trade tests in the British army as well as attending the Royal Military School Of Music and yet as I do not posess a post graduate degree in teaching I do not consider myself qualified to teach music, if people come to me and ask me to teach them Bass Guitar then I do but I consider that it is only ethical to inform them that I have no teaching qualifications, I not only teach them how to play their instrument I also teach them about it and how to do routine maintenance (set up action etc).
Guitar teachers are ten a penny where I live teaching scales and chords to local kids most of whom pack it in within the first year
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#16
I have taught since school part time. Recently quit my day job to do it full time (private teaching from home). Lifestyle is great-lots of independence, money is better is decent-lots of job satisfaction. Better than rat race.

Major issues to consider with going for music teaching are:-
there are only so many hours per week you can physically teach..normal job is 35/40 hours in the UK..its very tiring and difficult to do 40 lessons per week.

Also in regards to money-you are never going to become a millionare as a teacher..i asked my tutors for their advice about going full time, and they said they would have to work until they are 70's to get a decent pension.

Being a self employed teacher is (like most self employment) very variable (and i live in Edinburgh) if its rural Eire you may struggle. My girlfriend is employed so this helps if i have less pupils..and i also play gigs to make more cash. I wouldnt work in a school/institution because i like being my own boss!.

In short if you need 1)Patience 2)Confidence 3) Communication and Influencing Skills. A degree helps but its no prerequisite in the UK (most people dont ask what qualifications you have. Teaching will not make you megabucks (unless you maybe employ others, but i was in the rat race which gave me no time, no energy left and depressed the hell outta me!.

You could try it and always have a career change later in life so dont stress mate.