#1
just wondering how do you guy go about writting a solo when you have written the rest of the song?
#3
know what key it is in then decide what scale would go with it good i e major, minor, blues ect. then just play what ever feels right to you.
#4
I loop the song and improvise around it, recording myself on a new track each time automatically. Then I listen to it, pick the bits I like and rearrange them into one long solo, which I then learn and record fully.
#5
well i usually kinda feel it out, i use the musical knowledge i have (scales,modes theory etc) and just go for what sounds and feels right, sometimes i go "outside the box" and play stuff that doesn't fit directly in w/ music theory but it all just ends up being whatever sounds good and feels right for the song
#7
Quote by dedossangrantes
record on a tape satanic speaches and play it backwards


haha... funny...

for me I just mess around on the guitar and if i do something that i like then i will transpose it into a scale that fits with the song, or one close enough to it.
#8
In order to write a good solo youll need some decent music theory knowledge. Youll need to know some of the basic scales (Major, Pentatonic) and there modes. Memorizing what kind of chords go over what modes helps for example how min7 chords fit with the Dorian mode because Dorian mode and min7 chords both have flatted 3rd and flatted 7th notes in them. Also though try messing around outside the box. Some chromatic things everyonce in awhile doesnt hurt either. So yeah just try and learn some theory about scales and chords and how to make chords and such, there are plenty of sites on the internet that can help you.

Good luck!
#9
My technique for solos is; play a short low bit, widdle around near 17th fret on the G go really high, low again, high again, end with vibrato. This is very effective! Scales just don't work for me.
#10
Find a few melodic hooks and catches for the solo to hang on to and then outline those with lots of frills and embellishments.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#11
You don't NEED theory to write a good solo.

Or at least, you don't have to look at a progression and say, " I think I'll use D Phrygian here."

However, if you know what sound you want, and you know a scale or mode that matches that sound, knowing theory can save you some time.


I try to approach a solo using different techniques and see what grabs my ear. I might write out a few harmony lines, use doublestops, or try emphasizing certain chord tones. If I write the solo in advance, I want it to be something other than generic noodling on scales. It should be a theme in itself, or should contain cool themes.
#12
Imagine what you want it to sound like e.g. slow and sad, or bluesy, or shred.
Imagine licks that would sound good.
Then play.
#13
scales... lots of scales. if its in a minor key use Ionian and not Dorian... if its in a major key use Dorian or Ionian depending on the flavor you want.

harmonic, melodic, harmonic minor, melodic minor, or Hungarian minor depending on the flavor you want...

you may want to try ****ing around with the modes of some Asian or Spanish scales too.

The key is to make sure it doesn't sound off and out of key... the easiest way to solo is arpeggios or pentatonic and transition into the modes later on.
#14
I hear the solo in my head, then I write it down. The solo is the one part of the song that I just can't bring myself to force.
#15
I usually just improvise a bit and write what sounds good out of it. Live, I'll mostly just improvise it anyway. Once, though, I did something weird because I was bored and wanted something unusual. I vocally improvised (just vowels singing the notes over the chord progression) and recorded it, then reversed it and figured out how to play it on guitar. It ended up sounding pretty cool.
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#16
Quote by silentdud
scales... lots of scales. if its in a minor key use Ionian and not Dorian... if its in a major key use Dorian or Ionian depending on the flavor you want.


Ionian is a major mode and Dorian is a minor mode, so this statement does not make much sense.
#18
sometimes i go "outside the box" and play stuff that doesn't fit directly in w/ music theory but it all just ends up being whatever sounds good and feels right for the song


Nothing is outside music theory. As Mark Levine stated in The Jazz Theory Book, " 'Theory' is the little intellectual dance we do around the music, attempting to come u pwith rules so we can understand why Charlie Parker and John Coltrane sounded the way they did."

Everything in music can be analyzed and explained via music theory even "outside" playing (reletionship of the notes to the original tones giving the dissonance etc.).

And in answer to your question, I first attempte to "feel the groove" of the song, come up with a theme of some sorts and embelish over it.
#19
Quote by splice
boy nothing gets past you psychodelia


Was that sarcastic? I'm unable to tell online.
#21
The notes of an Am chord: A C E
The notes of A Dorian: A B C D E F# G

They don't clash.

Neither has a diminished third. Flatting a major interval makes it minor, and flatting a minor interval makes it diminished. A major third above A is C#, a minor third would be A to C, and a diminished third would be A to Cb.
#22
Quote by silentdud
I was always told to avoid playing Dorian over minor chords just because it clashes and they both have diminished 3rds... for example no A dorian over A minor.

Yeah, psycodlia's right... that's just dumb. Dorian IS a minor mode. The only difference between it and the minor these people who told you this are talking about is the 6th: flat in aeolian/natural minor, unaltered in dorian.

Dorian is a "happy minor" if you play that 6th a lot.


red
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