#1
Well, I've been pinpointing my points of tension in an effort to retrain my muscles..

I've found tension in my right shoulder, right bicep and tricep and even my forearm. In fact, since I've actually been "searching" for this tension, I seem to be noticing it even when I'm not playing guitar..mainly in my shoulder and bicep.

Essentially it's all in my right arm, which doesn't suprise me. I have a high bout of it while standing up as opposed to sitting down.

Anyway, I'm just looking for comments, perhaps from people whom have experienced the same tension in the same general region..I'm adjusting the strap, my posture and being attentive and am still experiencing tension. I am making an effor NOT to anchor, and am curious how this plays into resting your forearm on the side of the guitar. I believe that a great deal stems from holding my arm up in general. I have plenty of strength there, no question about it..but I'm still confused.

Anyway, sorry this was long and incessant..It's just frustrating..I've looked online..guitar principles, this website, and have found advice on what to do, but it persists..
#2
Is it possible you may have pinched a nerve? I had busted up my shoulder playing hockey and every once in awhile it hurts when i play guitar.
...:::The Master Chief :::...
#3
Quote by Noomz
Is it possible you may have pinched a nerve? I had busted up my shoulder playing hockey and every once in awhile it hurts when i play guitar.


Ya know, I'm wondering..because I've never experienced shoudler tension like this before..unless zeroing in on your tension can somehow ACCENTUATE it..

Hmm..
#4
i don't think Zeroing in on your tension would make it worse but it's possible you may have something out of alignment in your back, if your spine is sitting a little off it can give you pains all over your body such as your tension, maybe enquire with a chyropractor for some better info about it
...:::The Master Chief :::...
#5
Quote by Noomz
i don't think Zeroing in on your tension would make it worse but it's possible you may have something out of alignment in your back, if your spine is sitting a little off it can give you pains all over your body such as your tension, maybe enquire with a chyropractor for some better info about it


Yeah, I'll take it into consideration..really hope it isn't the case but you make a good point..

Thanks..
#6
No problem, Just helping out our fellow UGers, i know how it feels to have a pain when you play, not very fun
...:::The Master Chief :::...
#7
First off paying attention to your tension will NOT make it worse. You have to be
aware of something before you can fix it.

I had/have a similar problem at times with my right shoulder. Mine will tend to
rise up and get tense and I have to pay attention to it. Just relax it and let it
fall a bit.

Personally, I don't feel that resting your ARM for some support on the guitar
is really at all bad form. Just make sure it's up near the elbow and isn't interfering
with elbow motion.

In a recent Guitar Principles newsletter, Jamie Andreas made a really nice
observation about relaxation and picking. Your body will want to tense up
by reflex in various parts when the pick makes contact with the string. If
you aren't aware of the tension, you will have the feeling that the string is
hard and unyielding. If you become aware of the tension and can relax and
pick *through* the string, you will get the impression the string is "elastic"
and "rubbery". Very Nice observation! Look for that "rubbery" feeling when
you pick and move towards it. That will give you some indication of how
relaxed your picking is.
#8
Quote by lemonsquares
I am making an effor NOT to anchor, and am curious how this plays into resting your forearm on the side of the guitar. I believe that a great deal stems from holding my arm up in general. I have plenty of strength there, no question about it..but I'm still confused.


Simply put, this is one of the hardest parts of good technique. No bones about it.

Floating the arm is hard to do. A lot of people, as has been said in the anchoring thread, over "un-anchor" leave their arm out too far from the body, meaning that its at a far harder angle to support. Its really a posture thing. You'll find theres one point where you can float your arm forever and not get tired, and there's other point a few degrees of extension off where it could be agony after 5 minutes.

The shoulder and arm tension stuff is incredibly hard to beat. I havent. Im using the Andreas method. I suggest you do plenty of No tempo. I find nowadays that even THINKING about guitar makes me relax my shoulders.

Theres not much else to say, this is a topic i have a lot of bother with myself and i think is ridiculously hard.
#9
Thanks, edg..I suppose it's just gonna be a matter of catching the tension when it occurs and training my muscle to relax..no shortcuts, I know..it's just a tough road..

I may have a pinched nerve in my shoulder, however..so I will be checking into that..

Thanks again
#10
Quote by Freepower
Simply put, this is one of the hardest parts of good technique. No bones about it.

Floating the arm is hard to do. A lot of people, as has been said in the anchoring thread, over "un-anchor" leave their arm out too far from the body, meaning that its at a far harder angle to support. Its really a posture thing. You'll find theres one point where you can float your arm forever and not get tired, and there's other point a few degrees of extension off where it could be agony after 5 minutes.

The shoulder and arm tension stuff is incredibly hard to beat. I havent. Im using the Andreas method. I suggest you do plenty of No tempo. I find nowadays that even THINKING about guitar makes me relax my shoulders.

Theres not much else to say, this is a topic i have a lot of bother with myself and i think is ridiculously hard.


Yes..I'm just glad I've become aware of this now..I've been taking it seriously for quite some time and am glad I have found the hindrance and am able to work on it..

But like you said, it's HARD..but hey, the benefit's surpass the sacrifice..by far..