#1
I've heard from several different people, including my guitar teacher that listening to all genres of music would help me become a better musician. I'm into metal like metallica and the like, but i have listened to other bands like RHCP, flogging molly, Queen, many different pop-punk bands, and virtually everything else you can imagine, but i don't feel that it has helped me improve as a musician and guitar player. I was wondering about all of your guys' opinions about this. DO you think listening to other music than what you like affects your musicianship, or all the people i've talked to deluded in some way?
#2
I agree with them. Now a variety of Metallica to Queen and such isn't as big of a difference as say, Metallica, John Coltrane, and Antonio Vivaldi. Listen to music that makes you think in different ways, like Jazz and Classical
#3
If you only listen to popular music (and by popular I mean all forms of rock/metal/punk etc.) you will think musically in a pop-music sense.

What they probably mean is (as SickMetal stated) branching out into Jazz, Classical etc. where you can get different/more ideas and influence.
#4
yup totally, when i first started playing i pretty much only listened to and learned metallica/megadeth and stuff like that..... then it got to the point where i sounded just like them, which at the time i thought was great, but then when i wanted to start doing other stuff i was f*cked...... yer best bet is to listen to tons of stuff, you don't have to like it per se but at least acknowledge it as music and try to learn from the idea of it (hey i don't like britney spears but i know at least 1 or 2 of you have wanted to make a metal version of "crazy" which is hella catchy whether you like it or not)
#5
listenin to jazz and classical along with metal or whatever else your into will definetely help. If it doesnt, maybe your not listening or absorbing it properly.
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#6
Quote by Arkane
listenin to jazz and classical along with metal or whatever else your into will definetely help. If it doesnt, maybe your not listening or absorbing it properly.


i'm totally not trying to be a pr!ck but how can you listen to music wrong?? i mean, it's just listening to and absorbing the idea behind it...... the only way (i see) to listen to it wrong is to not listen to it, like when someone offers you advice, you can choose not to listen to them and take the advice....
#8
ok, i can see that, i try and understand everything i listen to, it's totally second nature and i guess i assumed others do the same. perhaps i just take it for granted :-/
#9
Well considering everything you listed is rock, I don't think you're really "branching out" yet.

Just listen to musicians playing from other genres, of which classical and jazz will probably be the most recommended. You learn more from trying to learn pieces, but from listening you can still pick up on techniques, and what guys do in different playing situations. You might hear how a guy is swinging the 8th notes in a swing tune, or the phrasing in a classical piece. My advice is to listen to other genres, and if you hear something you like, try to learn it, then incorporate it into your playing.
#10
From personal experience, listening to a wide variety of music has helped me develop a more unique style of playing. One of my big influences when I was starting out was David Gilmour, and he was pretty much by biggest influence for about a year, so there's still hints of his style in my own style. However, I started listening to a lot of metal, indie, jazz, and ska over the next 4 years of playing, so now my style has developed into a sort of combination. Listening to music helps give you a wider perspective on music in general and makes you look at it from all different points of view, instead of just focusing on one genre. Diversity is a good thing. Even if you're only going to be playing one genre of music in a band or whatever, it's good to have an idea of other music styles, too.
#11
whoa whoa whoa, that was 10 years ago psychodelia, i listen to everything now, from rap, r&b, jazz, funk, classical, blues, country, tons of stuff that isn't even almost music (listen to pink floyds first album, umma gumma, totally beyond weirdness, indian drums, feather not dot, tribal music in general) so yeah, 10 years ago it was all in the same category but totally not anymore
#12
yeah dude just get a bunch of jazz records and listen to some classical and blues records too, you just have to think of a new style, and EMBRACE it. not only that, but learn a few tunes from it, because it'll definitely give you a new perspective on how to approach the instrument.
"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace."
- Jimi Hendrix
#13
a while ago, I was trying to get something new in my playing. So what I did was I stopped listening to music for about 3 weeks. All together. Nothing (except for like, background music at random places). And during that time, on my guitar/piano/brass instruments, I tried to bring out what I thought was my personal style of music. It turned out extremely awesome. I showed it to a few friends and they couldn't classify it as a genre, but it was completely new and conformed to nothing except for what I wanted. When I started listening to music again, I listened to all my usual stuff, like Jam Bands, Classic Rock, a few Jazz and Funk CDs, and I had a whole new appreciation for what music is.
#14
i think that some of that stuff is a step in the right direction, now just take it further. so for RHCP, look into some of the funk and old RnB stuff that influenced them. for Flogging Molly (a personal favorite), look into some actual celtic tunes which can be quite good. then look into some classical music, and while you probably wont like some of it i would bet you find some you do. once you start listening to this wide base of styles, try to figure out what makes these styles tick. obviously some of these are very wide, ie. classical. you might start to hear a particular rhythm in funk that you like, or a style of phrasing in celtic music that sounds cool, and then you can incorporate these ideas into your playing. THAT is where this idea that your musicianship can be affected by listening to a wide variety of music comes from, and its completly true.
#15
I listen to pretty much every type of music, and I still suck.

Anyway, I still think that you can learn more from studying the styles and structures of different types of music rather than just one specific style of music.
#16
By listening to other genres of music you will widen your knowledge, stick to one style and you will become a one trick guitarist along with 98% of the other one trick guitarists.
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#17
I personally think that it's a great benefit to listen to loads of different styles of music, this is basically because if you only ever listen to one style you'll only ever know how to sound like that style and so be boring.

I recommend you listen to anything and everything that grabs your ear even slightly, I mean EVERYTHING jazz, classical, trance music, dance music, euphoria stuff, indie, punk(I hate punk), most types of metal...just everything...
'If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch you must first invent the Universe' - Carl Sagan.
#18
Definetly helps. Try listening to ska, hip hop and other such styles for beats and more rhythm. Jazz, rap and hardcore gives more indication of what different sounds and melodies can be obtained through vocals etc etc.

And baroque owns.........
#19
Quote by z4twenny
whoa whoa whoa, that was 10 years ago psychodelia, i listen to everything now, from rap, r&b, jazz, funk, classical, blues, country, tons of stuff that isn't even almost music (listen to pink floyds first album, umma gumma, totally beyond weirdness, indian drums, feather not dot, tribal music in general) so yeah, 10 years ago it was all in the same category but totally not anymore


I was referring to the threadstarter. No worries .

I don't even care that much if someone doesn't really listen to much other music, I just don't think that listening to different types of rock is really branching out.
#20
Quote by Sir Edwin CBE
Definetly helps. Try listening to ska, hip hop and other such styles for beats and more rhythm. Jazz, rap and hardcore gives more indication of what different sounds and melodies can be obtained through vocals etc etc.

And baroque owns.........


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