#1
I'm still a beginner but for me it seems like solos are easier to play than rhythem parts. In solo's you usually have just single notes making an easy rhythem to get in your head, but then with the rhythem parts of songs you have to play multiple notes at the same time and figure out the strumming since it usually isnt always just the same notes, then palm mutic, ect. Maybe its cause I am still new but does anyone else feel this way?
#2
most rythem that I see is power chords...which are VERY simple...
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#3
lol


ok didn't want to be a jerk so let me add this

It's not about 'rhythm vs solo'. Rhythm can be just as complex to play as many solos out there; it rarely is, because most of the time, rhythm is just a 'base' over which the song itself is built, it doesn't need to be complicated - so there are just several general shapes you move through, or whatever. There are exceptions, of course. But generally, lead guitar lines are way more complicated than rhythms.
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#4
it's because you're new at guitar
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#5
i take it if youre a beginner, your talking easy solos (like one-stringers) or something, because solo/lead techniques can get quite complicated.

THings that you feel like you are struggling with, like multiple notes at one time, and strumming patterns is really reallly reallly easy. When you practice more at playing the guitar, you shoudl be able to pick up strum patterns and be able to move into different complex chord shapes easily.

Think about it, how can you play solos without knowing how to move your hands to certain shapes? true, you arnt playing them all at once, usually, but you need to be able to move your hands in sequence to what you are soloing...and you need to undertand rhythm for soloing, up and down picking patterns (believe it or not is just as, if not more complicated than rhythm chord strumming.

give it some practice and youll see that you need to be good at rhythm in order to excel at solos/lead.
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#6
The solos will get more complicated when you realize they are too fast for your fret hand to chase single notes around, and you're having to finger really strange chords high up the fretboard just to keep up with the notes per second. I would say the solo in smells like teen spirit is easier than the powerchord rythm section, but that is the only song I can think of where that happens. Most solos are 10x harder than rhythm, and can take 100s of times longer to learn.
#7
Many people on this forum are tab-memorizers with very little interest in creating actual music. They will tell you that playing rhythm is easy and not worth your time. Don't believe them.

It takes a lot of skill and practice to play GOOD rhythm. I'm not talking about power chords... I'm talking about strumming 16ths over funk chords and muting with both hands to create an unbelievable groove. Keeping time and tempo properly is a lot harder than it seems. Rhythm is important... it is the backbone of most musical styles.

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#8
^Amen.

Solos are one thing...rhythm is a whole different boat.

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#9
For the large part i would tend to agree with that, i think alot of the reason that would true is. Generally most people wouldnt regocnise a solo note for note so even you mess up or change it, alot of people wouldnt notice but if you changed the rythm of a song even slightly. You'll get "your playing it wrong".

It largely depends on the song, and what you practise more. I find solos easier because since the start i just wanted to play solos so 90% of my practising has been solo oriantated. Loads of scale runs, improvising in pentatonic boxes, learning modes. Finger tapping sweeped arpeggios etc. I can play rythm pretty well its just not the reason i reach for my guitar to have a noodle and id say alot of people are like that. Everyone wants to be the guitarist in the spotlight, its why its hard to find a good bass player lol.
#10
Yeah its really up to you especially if you make your own music. YOu can make the rythm very complicated and the lead easy and vise versa etc.

But mostly its the lead that is the problem, like example master of puppets, the main super fast solo is pretty complicated to many people who started or intermediate, and the rythm is just simply one of the verse riffs.

Just trying to give an example. ^
#11
^ To be fair, it really just depends on the style of music you play, I guess. Check out for example Iced Earth, pretty much all of their songs are centered around riffs/rhythms. On the other hand, I guess they aren't as hard to play as some of Satriani's or Malmsteen's stuff, either. Meh.
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#12
Quote by Armored Artist
Many people on this forum are tab-memorizers with very little interest in creating actual music. They will tell you that playing rhythm is easy and not worth your time. Don't believe them.

It takes a lot of skill and practice to play GOOD rhythm. I'm not talking about power chords... I'm talking about strumming 16ths over funk chords and muting with both hands to create an unbelievable groove. Keeping time and tempo properly is a lot harder than it seems. Rhythm is important... it is the backbone of most musical styles.


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#13
Anyone who even gives the idea that one is harder than the other a thought is an idiot.
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#14
Quote by Armored Artist
Many people on this forum are tab-memorizers with very little interest in creating actual music. They will tell you that playing rhythm is easy and not worth your time. Don't believe them.

It takes a lot of skill and practice to play GOOD rhythm. I'm not talking about power chords... I'm talking about strumming 16ths over funk chords and muting with both hands to create an unbelievable groove. Keeping time and tempo properly is a lot harder than it seems. Rhythm is important... it is the backbone of most musical styles.


I second that one! The rythm in a song is the backbone. Drums, bass and rythm guitar HAS TO WORK ALONG! If they don't the song will be untight an sloppy. But since it's the lead guitar most people listen too they tend to forget that there's a band backing him/her up and that the band actually makes the solos sound the way they do. You can't make a feely solo without feely backing.
#15
not sure what everyone ones talking about...soloing is so much harder then rythm if we are talking about strictly chord rythm. i could understand if we are including hendrix style riffs as rythm but i do'nt think we are. chords come naturally once you learn how to play them. after a while you don't even think, your hands and musles are just trained to do what you want. when it comes to writing rythm parts its so much easier to write a original sounding riff then it is to right a lead solo for it as solos tend to sound the same if you don't really make it your own.

you don't even need a rythm guitar. many many great bands only had a bass and drums and they can hold down the rythm section just fine (with a lead guitarist of course/ex...hendrix, SRV..etc)...as a matter of fact i'd say a great bass player and drummer are so much more important to your rythm section than a guitar player who plays over the top of it.
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#16
wwah bonchie agree to yah.

Everyone disses out the bass guitar since everyone saying it just pluck-pluck,slap-slap actions even tho its second to the drums for the backbone of ur music or in ur band.
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#17
Quote by sylent
wwah bonchie agree to yah.

Everyone disses out the bass guitar since everyone saying it just pluck-pluck,slap-slap actions even tho its second to the drums for the backbone of ur music or in ur band.


yep

bass was my first instrument and bass is almost like playing lead guitar if your good at it. a good bass player won't just go thump thump thump but will walk around as he goes to his next root note adding so much to the rythm.

as for slap slap slap...i challenge any guitar player to try to slap a bass with any semblence of skill...its probably one of the hardest things to get good at and use correctly in timing.
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#18
yeah, cuz i tested out a bass at my school, i could only pluck it all out. But the slapping is so hard lol. I didnt hear one slap sound out of the amp.
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#19
Im a good jam band, rhythm in itself is an improvisation, where all 3 players of the rhythm section must be perfectly together, and yet keep the song progressing in some way.

Plus, eg, take the 12 bar blues, its not all 5th chords, you can add jazz chords, shout choruses, switch up the rhythm (though tell your other players first). I love playing rhythm guitar, Its just as important as the solo (though I do solo in my band, slower songs though, I cant play fast leads, but i can play bluesy ones)
#20
i find rhythm guitar to be easier than solos and lead guitar. I'm not saying rhythm is easy, because it's not always easy, but I find it easier then doing a really good solo.

In my band, my bassist URGES me to play lead guitar parts, instead of rhythm, because it's only a 3 member band, a bassist, the drummer, and the guitarist, but I can't play lead that well. So we got another person to join and play lead.

Yeah so that really had nothing to do with this, but good luck figuring out which is harder to play.
#23
Both are probably equally hard/easy depending on what you make of it. Yeah, power chords and simple shaped bar chords are pretty easy, but so are a lot of neat sounding solos.

But both can be made more complex, as suits the song, I mean, if a tab says play an E-major chord for a certain length of time in a song, then you ain't gonna be actually playing E-major for most of that time, you're gonna be altering the fingering slightly as required, plus bends and vibrato, etc.