#1
Alright.
Got an easy question.
Thus it's easy i dont know the answer myself...

Lets say I know how to play A minor scale.
Do i have to learn the A#,B,C,C#,D,D#,E,F,F#,G,G# too so i know all the keys in the scale.
Or is there any connection between them?
Seems kinda hard memorising it all.
#2
So long as you're playing it on guitar or bass, there's really just a simple box patter/formation that you move around the neck to get the different keys.

However if you plan to (or already are) play a different instrument (anywhere from piano to saxophone) actually make an effort to learn the notes. Maybe not in all keys, but the most popular ones for starters. (C, F, Bb, Eb, G, D, A)
#3
Quote by Maet
So long as you're playing it on guitar or bass, there's really just a simple box patter/formation that you move around the neck to get the different keys.

However if you plan to (or already are) play a different instrument (anywhere from piano to saxophone) actually make an effort to learn the notes. Maybe not in all keys, but the most popular ones for starters. (C, F, Bb, Eb, G, D, A)


Why not learn the notes? It's not that hard, and pretty important.

To the original poster:

It seems daunting, doesn't it? Well, the thing is you don't have to really have them all memorized as much as a strong knowledge of intervals and note names. If you learn HOW a major scale is constructed as far as full steps and half steps go, then it becomes a lot easier to quick know, for example, the third of an A# major chord.

#4
Correct me if im wrong here, but...

MAJOR SCALE:

W W H W W W H (W= 2 frets, H= 1, stands for whole and half.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

MINOR SCALE:

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 8

Say, for example, you want to find out a C Major Scale.
C D E F G A B C

Play this out, and you'll realise that between the E and F, and the B and C, there is only 1 fret (half)

If you change the 3rd and 6th notes to a flat (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 8,) you will have a C minor scale. (again, correct me if im wrong, im still figuring this out myself)
......... because here at mcdonald's our special ingredient is our people...
#5
Quote by Mitch72
Correct me if im wrong here, but...

MAJOR SCALE:

W W H W W W H (W= 2 frets, H= 1, stands for whole and half.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

MINOR SCALE:

1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 8

Say, for example, you want to find out a C Major Scale.
C D E F G A B C

Play this out, and you'll realise that between the E and F, and the B and C, there is only 1 fret (half)

If you change the 3rd and 6th notes to a flat (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 8,) you will have a C minor scale. (again, correct me if im wrong, im still figuring this out myself)



You're close, but the 7 in the natural minor scale is also flat.

#6
i think there is something you can do, i think its with minor scales though, i cant remember, where like all the ones that are sharped, become flat, and vice versa

anybody know what im talking about?
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#7
Quote by Slurgi
You're close, but the 7 in the natural minor scale is also flat.



lol thanks mate

Quote by EZLN libertad

i think there is something you can do, i think its with minor scales though, i cant remember, where like all the ones that are sharped, become flat, and vice versa

anybody know what im talking about?


Relative Minors? I know it's not where all the sharps are changed to flats, but in every major key there will be a major scale that will "match" it (that will have the same notes, but not the same root),

e.g.
C Major (C D E F G A B C)
is relative to:
A Minor (A B C D E F G A)

G Major (G A B C D E F# G)
is relative to:
E Minor (E F# G A B C D E)

I think...

It's not what you described, but I think it's where you're coming from.
......... because here at mcdonald's our special ingredient is our people...