#1
i suppose i'll put this thread here, 'cause itll get killed by sex threads in the pit if i put it there, and nowhere else seems like it'd fit

what are some good colleges for recording and producing?
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#2
Actually i just saw a book in my bookstore on this exact topic (I know, weird premise for a book). I go to Drexel University and our music industry program was ranked #5 by the book. I didn't take much time to look at the rest of it, but if I pass by it again I'll send you a pm or something.
Originally posted by FastDog7
yea music sucks


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#3
woot, thanks
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#4
My friend is going to one in florida that is supposed to be good... I want to say it's called fullsail or something? I'll have to ask him.
#5
Quote by EZLN libertad
i suppose i'll put this thread here, 'cause itll get killed by sex threads in the pit if i put it there, and nowhere else seems like it'd fit

what are some good colleges for recording and producing?



Probably the most prestigious is the Berklee School of music. They have a program in Music Production and Engineering, anyway (which I'm assuming is the same thing). It's apparently a pretty demanding college though, probably more hardcore than a lot of people.

And you're right about the what would happen if you posted it in the pit. You're welcome any time to Musicians Talk, information is more abundant and intelligible here.

#6
^ Actually regarding music proformance,, that would be Jilliard School in new york..

but for recording , thats debatable. A good school near me is the Musicians Instutude in hollywood, they have good recording engineering programs, expensive tho.
I like my women like I like my whiskey, 14 years old and full of coke.
#7
Quote by StaticFrame
Actually i just saw a book in my bookstore on this exact topic (I know, weird premise for a book). I go to Drexel University and our music industry program was ranked #5 by the book. I didn't take much time to look at the rest of it, but if I pass by it again I'll send you a pm or something.


do you recall the name of the book?

i was actually just going to post about this same topic. i was looking at belmont and middle tennessee state university. somebody here mentioned them to me before and they look good. belmont was in the lead at the moment cuz it looks like they would be able to get me internships and possibly even set me up for a job after graduation.

so what do you guys think? i'm at a community college now because a year ago i wasn't sure what i wanted to do, but i've taken a class in a recording studio at the school and my teacher is helping me sort through colleges that i come up with. so whatever you guys can give me would be helpful.
#8
There is a place that used to send me little flyers. It's called the muiscians institute in Hollywood, CA. They have a recording and sound production major available their.
Man... Signatures are hard to come up with!
#9
WOOT perfect topic!! ok im a freshmen in high school and thats exactly what i wanna be so can anyone tell me what i need to know to be able to...understand such things or be able to know what you guys do there? thanks much
No, no. The question is: Who DOESNT let their guitar sleep w/ them?
#10
Quote by Next_Hendrix
There is a place that used to send me little flyers. It's called the muiscians institute in Hollywood, CA. They have a recording and sound production major available their.




man, if only you knew how much i wanna go to that school...


wow, i started this thread a LONG time ago...
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#11
holy ████, i just realized that. i just searched for it and didn't even bother to look at the year in the date, i just assumed it was from sunday.
#12
DO NOT major in music production in college.. I'm serious. You are better off going to work for a studio doing grunt work and networking in town. Because you are going to do the same thing even with a degree. Save your money and buy a Pro Tools rig. Berklee has a good MP&E department, but it's also the most competitive major there and many students get turned down.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#13
I just checked out SAE in LA and it was pretty cool.
But really most of them are just trade schools and you are better off listening to whatever dutch apples has to say.
#14
yeah, i thought about that, but every recording engineer and every book that i've read has said that getting as much education as you can will give you the best chances of succeeding. i mean, how do you think studios choose interns or entry level workers? they don't want to waste their time on someone who hasn't even gone to college when there are probably plenty of other applicants who have an education. and studios say that they tend to see a maturity difference in people who have gone to college and people who haven't, especially in a field like this where everybody most likely thinks that they're god's gift to the industry.

and it's not all about the boost that college will give an application. i just want to know as much about this as possible, and there's a lot that college can teach me that an mbox protools rig won't.
#15
Then why not get a degree in something that is going to mean something? Most music companies won't care what your degree is in as long as you have some work experience in the studio to go along with it. I'm just saying that going to school JUST for recording is a waste of time.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#16
because of the second part of my answer. i just want to learn as much about recording as i can.
#17
Seriously just buy a good pro tools gig, record a lot of local bands, buy that book Sound Reinforcement and meet as many different engineers as possible. Here's an example:

At the nightclub I work at, a local high school rented out the concert hall one day for a Music Scholarship fundraiser. They had a lot of high school and alumni bands play. During the show, one of the stage hands they brought had this conversation with me:

Him- "So all you do here is manage the stage and run sound?"

Me- "Pretty much"

Him- "That's so cool, I'm about to graduate and going to (Insert name of an unaccredited "trade" music school here) to learn how to do that"

I was about to tell him that he was better off just applying to the same company I work for. None of the sound guys we have working went to school just for live sound. We have people who went for music business/songwriting like myself, a guy who just ran sound locally and then moved on to regional acts, a guy who just plays in local bands, and a guy who took some courses in broadcasting/business and worked in the adult film industry as a camera man. If he would have worked at this nightclub for a year, he would know just as much as if he would have went to that trade school and would have gained work experience in the process. And also made money....

The most important thing is you should never doubt yourself. Apply to companies even if you don't think you are qualified, you never know what that company is looking for at that moment and who else is applying. Get a job cleaning the building of a studio if you have to. Just something to get your face known.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#18
Dutch Apples is a man of wisdom.

I'm doing a course, but I'm getting the most out of free studio time, and it's also a good excuse to bum around.
#19
Quote by Dutch_Apples
Seriously just buy a good pro tools gig, record a lot of local bands, buy that book Sound Reinforcement and meet as many different engineers as possible. Here's an example:

At the nightclub I work at, a local high school rented out the concert hall one day for a Music Scholarship fundraiser. They had a lot of high school and alumni bands play. During the show, one of the stage hands they brought had this conversation with me:

Him- "So all you do here is manage the stage and run sound?"

Me- "Pretty much"

Him- "That's so cool, I'm about to graduate and going to (Insert name of an unaccredited "trade" music school here) to learn how to do that"

I was about to tell him that he was better off just applying to the same company I work for. None of the sound guys we have working went to school just for live sound. We have people who went for music business/songwriting like myself, a guy who just ran sound locally and then moved on to regional acts, a guy who just plays in local bands, and a guy who took some courses in broadcasting/business and worked in the adult film industry as a camera man. If he would have worked at this nightclub for a year, he would know just as much as if he would have went to that trade school and would have gained work experience in the process. And also made money....

The most important thing is you should never doubt yourself. Apply to companies even if you don't think you are qualified, you never know what that company is looking for at that moment and who else is applying. Get a job cleaning the building of a studio if you have to. Just something to get your face known.
All agreed, but if you want to be a producer or (especially) a masterer, you need an education. It'd be like walking into NASA without a degree in engineering and asking for a job! Especially since almost all recording is digital.

But true, doing live sound stuff and getting around like a whore do indeed help your cause.
Looking for my India/Django.
#20
yeah, i guess that i also don't have a lot of connections and i was thinking that college would be a good opportunity to make some of those. either way i'm going to college, cuz i expect to be mooching off my parents at some point in my life and it's kind of required. so i figured i would just go to a good school that could teach me all that i need to know and give me some opportunities for internships/entry level jobs. most of the schools that i've looked at have said that their internships in studios are only offered to students who major in sound engineering.

so basically i'm just wondering if anyone has any places for me to look for a good bachelors degree in sound engineering that would set me up with connections like you're talking about.
#21
Quote by Blue Motion
yeah, i guess that i also don't have a lot of connections and i was thinking that college would be a good opportunity to make some of those. either way i'm going to college, cuz i expect to be mooching off my parents at some point in my life and it's kind of required. so i figured i would just go to a good school that could teach me all that i need to know and give me some opportunities for internships/entry level jobs. most of the schools that i've looked at have said that their internships in studios are only offered to students who major in sound engineering.

so basically i'm just wondering if anyone has any places for me to look for a good bachelors degree in sound engineering that would set me up with connections like you're talking about.



werd...
i feel the same way....im a junior and i've really been looking around but idk all there is is Fullsail and couple others. Fullsail=no dorms and theres no way i can afford to rent a house in the orlando area. Ithaca=expensive and they only except 10 people per year into the recording arts program....

im thinking of just going to the local community college which offers a wide range of recording where you experience some recording, and some beginning theory classes and what not. maybe i could transfer after that to a better school.


haha whats funny is my Grandpa, although he died before i was born hence me never meeting him was a recording engineer for Columbia records and he recorded Barbra Streisand (sp) and bob dylan haha go figure.
#22
Alright, if you are hell bent on going to college for recording.. DO NOT GO TO FULL SAIL. First off, if you transfer, your credits probably won't and secondly, there Recording Arts program is huge there and they are a degree mill. I think it's something like 500 graduates a month and all going after the same jobs?

Now if you want to make some serious money in music engineering. Get a degree in acoustics. You are going to need a lot of math and scientific skills, but you can use this trade elsewhere besides in the studio. I was looking through one of those "college major" books in B&N the other week and saw that someone with a degree in acoustics starts out making around $70k a year. Not bad with just a BA.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#23
experience is your best bet but you will need something to credit you. Ive been doing this recording thing for about 3 years and every day i learn more and more. Right now im going to my local university to get my BA and plan to attend Musicians Institute for the 6month recording program to get a certificate as well. Its expensive but affordable. To me, there is no price on education.
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