#1
I was just wondering what stuff you guys work on while practicing. When I still had a guitar teacher, I practiced sight reading (standard notation) and the music theory he taught me, and I was practicing this stuff out of a Jazz Guitar book. But lately, I've found that since I started practicing alone again all I really do when I practice is Jam/Improvise and learn/tab out songs. What do you guys do?
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#3
I just practice songs solos and riffs and **** that ive learnt and learn new stuff. throw in a few finger exercises as well.
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#4
I just keep scaling, and increase speed, and alternate the notes. That's when im practicing seriously, for fun, i just play metallica and maiden
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#5
i usually spend a little while on finger exercises, then i work on memorizing songs (i have waay too many songs that i can't play w/o my sheet music) or tabbing stuff out.
#6
Find tabs for songs I like, or work my way through Troy Stetina's Speed For Lead book.
#7
i improvise on different songs sometimes i record em and then find what my good bad points are... if im just messin around ill just bust of a couple of licks and improvise with scales or just make up something
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#8
Well, I learn songs, practice other songs, just play riffs and solos i know, improvise with backing tracks, play along with my favorite songs, make new songs, and theres also this thing i do (almost) every session, i just started doing it. Its basically finger/speed exercises, chromatics gogin up and down the strings from 0 until 1, then the same but leaving otu the middle finger, then the same but leaving out the ring finger and using the middle finger, then i use my index middle and pinky with a fret in between each one and go up and down liek that. My hands hurt like hell when im done but its all worth it
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#9
I just do some finger excercises then maybe jsut watch a couple of guitar DVD i have and practice along with it and pick up anything I forgot. Or like most of the time, just work on a solo or practice writing your own riffs and stuff. Just have fun
#10
i play things I'm perfecting over and over.

i usually find new runs/licks to learn every few days...i'm running out of new stuff....
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#11
I jam alot with backing tracks to get my improvising up in speed and better. And I do some excercises with scales and stuff.
#12
Ear training, singing, ear training, technique, ear training, improv, theory, apply theory into improv or songwriting.
#13
improvise scales, bust out shreds, making own stuff, play songs, practice alot of lead (i guess im that type of guitarist), re-learn some scales, learn scales, try to play with my ears, and cleaning guitar. Its almost everytime different, but mostly i do the 10-hour steve vai in the beginning it really helps.
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#15
Right now im concentrating on melodic phrasing.
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#16
Just run over my songs 5 or 6 times and experiment a bit with pedals for new riffs.
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#17
Scales and improvise. I've never been too fond of trying to memorize a solo or songs although I have memorized many when i was just starting out for a few years.

I use the guitar as an outlet and fun. I don't practice anymore, since there's no need to. I'm mostly into blues/Jazz riffs.

Once you feel that learning a guitar is hard work, you're doomed. Your interest should be rewarded by improvisation and be on a life-long learning plan. Don't feel you must learn something on a time-table.

Guitar playing is a passion, don't make it an obsession where you feel that you must learn a riff or song to a point where you are questioning if you are practing correctly. Most of the time there is no one in front of you when you play anyway. There should be no pressure at all when learning.

The problem with lessons is that you are expected to learn at the instructors pace. Since we all learn differently, not all will meet the expectations. I would learn the scales very slowly and bulid on them. Before long every note you touch will sound good when you inprovise.
#18
Quote by madpickin03
Right now im concentrating on melodic phrasing.


is that like where someone plays a melody and they tell you the starting note and you have to write down the melody
#19
Just start off with practicing cromatic scales and regualar scales, then a little theory, then i just improve and see what im come up with


all that but i cant sit down for more than an hour on guitar or i start getting frustrated for some reason, takeing breaks really helps
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#20
Quote by azn_guitarist25
is that like where someone plays a melody and they tell you the starting note and you have to write down the melody


No....not at all. What you just said falls under ear training.

Phrasing is the choice of the notes you play, which order, how long they sound, if you play them staccato/legato etc. You can also conclude gear/tone to "Phrasing".

#21
Quote by azn_guitarist25
is that like where someone plays a melody and they tell you the starting note and you have to write down the melody

Nope, its what you call writing a piece of essay, in guitar term language. Basically rather than fret wanking-a'la shred (which i did a lot to get familiarize with scales). I've also done tons of improvisation to also get to know the fretboard better.

I've mastered basic scales and arpeggios, so now im putting it to full good use of actually creating good melody (good essay), rather than beating around the bush senselessly (wank-shredding). This is very good to eliminate repetition in improvisation and make them sound more like... full emotional music
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Last edited by madpickin03 at May 21, 2006,
#22
back when i first start, i played for about a total of 5 minutes a day running my finger up and down the neck on the low e string cause it sounded cool...now i start off by usually playing the solo to 'money' by Pink Floyd...that gets my fingers warmed up. The i just go through scales and play oher various songs/solos and have a good time
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#23
Improvise and jam. Learn a tab sometimes.
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#24
Quote by madpickin03
Nope, its what you call writing a piece of essay, in guitar term language. Basically rather than fret wanking-a'la shred (which i did a lot to get familiarize with scales). I've also done tons of improvisation to also get to know the fretboard better.

I've mastered basic scales and arpeggios, so now im putting it to full good use of actually creating good melody (good essay), rather than beating around the bush senselessly (wank-shredding). This is very good to eliminate repetition in improvisation and make them sound more like... full emotional music

Yeah I've found that that's my problem...All I do is play random notes in the scale and play cliche repetetive licks...Any tips on how to fix that?
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#25
I do some shred excersises and loads of scales, run up and down with some malmsteen(attempts mainly) and I sometimes check up on a tab. I already know quite alot of theory.

I dont do notation with guitar, but I am learning the Piano and am getting the feel for it.

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#26
Im also very bad with my repetitivness when improvising. I know all the scale across the fretboard (not comletley comfortably, but I can remerber them) but quite little music theory, so when I improve its either on a scale with some random bends and cheesy stuff, or its just "wankshredding" which impresses my friends with its speed (for about 2.5 years of playing) but I know its not very good technique.

So all these things im reading sound very helpful, phrasing and just learning more theory etc... but where should I start? Anyone have any good lead exersizes or theory to learn for improving improv and general leads?
#27
Quote by Elven_King
Im also very bad with my repetitivness when improvising. I know all the scale across the fretboard (not comletley comfortably, but I can remerber them) but quite little music theory, so when I improve its either on a scale with some random bends and cheesy stuff, or its just "wankshredding" which impresses my friends with its speed (for about 2.5 years of playing) but I know its not very good technique.

So all these things im reading sound very helpful, phrasing and just learning more theory etc... but where should I start? Anyone have any good lead exersizes or theory to learn for improving improv and general leads?

Glad to see I'm not the only one
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#29
Quote by S0ulja23
Yeah I've found that that's my problem...All I do is play random notes in the scale and play cliche repetetive licks...Any tips on how to fix that?

Quote by Elven_King
Im also very bad with my repetitivness when improvising. I know all the scale across the fretboard (not comletley comfortably, but I can remerber them) but quite little music theory, so when I improve its either on a scale with some random bends and cheesy stuff, or its just "wankshredding" which impresses my friends with its speed (for about 2.5 years of playing) but I know its not very good technique.

So all these things im reading sound very helpful, phrasing and just learning more theory etc... but where should I start? Anyone have any good lead exersizes or theory to learn for improving improv and general leads?

Ok, for all of ya's thats asking how to do proper melodic phrasing and whatnot. Here's the answer that i've come up with.

Ok here we go. So your basic scale have 7 notes, Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, and Ti. So what you guys actually need to do is, to separate this notes in the box scale to just 7 and try to find the different octave of it. The reason you guys actually be repetitive is that, you guys dont know how to stop, i presume that coz i countered this problem before. And another thing, DO NOT PLAY FAST 1st, get your sh!t together and slow it down, if you have the main idea of a certain melody, hang on to it and just add more notes to it, in music term this is called Syncopation which means off-beat. So it'll be just like filling gaps and whatnot.

Check out anything made by ex-Megadeth guitarist, the one and only, awesome, Marty Friedman. He is very very good at this thing, and he doesnt play too fast, his melody >>> pointless shred. Learn "his" songs and videos and not Megadeth's. And if you think 7 notes per scale is too much, use a minor pentatonic, thats the simplest form and just take your time and create your own melody, playing either over a jam track or a recorded progression. Hope this helps ...
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Last edited by madpickin03 at May 22, 2006,
#30
Quote by madpickin03
Ok, for all of ya's thats asking how to do proper melodic phrasing and whatnot. Here's the answer that i've come up with.

Ok here we go. So your basic scale have 7 notes, Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, and Ti. So what you guys actually need to do is, to separate this notes in the box scale to just 7 and try to find the different octave of it. The reason you guys actually be repetitive is that, you guys dont know how to stop, i presume that coz i countered this problem before. And another thing, DO NOT PLAY FAST 1st, get your sh!t together and slow it down, if you have the main idea of a certain melody, hang on to it and just add more notes to it, in music term this is called Syncopation which means off-beat. So it'll be just like filling gaps and whatnot.

Check out anything made by ex-Megadeth guitarist, the one and only, awesome, Marty Friedman. He is very very good at this thing, and he doesnt play too fast, his melody >>> pointless shred. Learn "his" songs and videos and not Megadeth's. And if you think 7 notes per scale is too much, use a minor pentatonic, thats the simplest form and just take your time and create your own melody, playing either over a jam track or a recorded progression. Hope this helps ...


Wow that helps a lot! Thanks
I'll try that today
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#31
Lately I've been practicing with a metronome. Mainly scales with it. I start at the lowest setting (40 bpm on mine) and work my way up to the highest setting-adding 10 bpm once I have the scale down at that speed. I keep adding speed until I have the scale mastered at the highest speed (240 bpm on my metronome). Pretty cool to see how fast you can increase your speed just by practicing the scale slowly and gradually increasing the speed.

I also take lessons, so I practice whatever my guitar teacher shows me.

And of course I learn all of my favorite songs by bands I like from the TABs on this fine website.

Then, I write a lot of my own songs. I'm still looking for my own sound, so I write in a lot of genres, but I'm developing my own style of playing, so the more I write, the more my songs lead to my own sound. As I write more the songs sound more streamlined with one another.

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#32
Yah, thanks for the lesson Soulja.. I already know all the box shapes and can play them, plus I do use octaves. But still I dont do it often and dont vary enough, i geuss its just me being lazy...
#33
Play and improvise songs.
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#34
scales,songs,solos

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#35
Finger exercises, scales and arpeggios (im trying to get sweeps down) w/ metronome. Then I just do some improvising on jam tracks.
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#36
generally it goes like this:
plug in
volume up
play some random stuff
play a grind song i made up to warm up
run through some scalar exercises
play through my songs
rock out on grind song again
stop
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#37
Currently I'm working on:

1) Diatonic 4ths in every position. Outside picked, inside picked and 2 string sweeps.
2) A 3 string pent pattern involving some sweeps starting on every note.
3) 1-3-5 Arpeggios moving diatonically up the neck. Alternate ascend & descend sweeps.
4) 1-3-5 Arpeggios moving across the neck diatonically in 4ths. Cross picked & alternate ascend and descend sweeps.
5) Same as 3 and 4 but with 1st inversion (5-1-3)
6) Same as 3 and 4 but with 2nd inversion (3-5-1)
7) Some patterns that move in diatonic fifths

Usually I'll, target some techniques to work on. Those give me a good workout on
cross picking, sweeping, finger rolls and some good stretches. Additionally,
navigating the entire major scale in arpeggios is very useful. I generally work
on any one item a couple months until I know is pretty well and then I'll
add something new.

My playing gets a lot better when I start getting good at a particular exercise and
at some point bits and pieces start getting incorportated into my improv.
#38
its funny when i start sometimes i suck, then when i play nice songs i, myself make up nice riffs
#39
Okay, to use a chess analagy:

Learning to play chess takes 5 minutes, just to know which pieces can move where, and the basic rules,
Mastering chess takes a whole lifetime, thinking 10 moves ahead, planning out game plans etc etc

So playing guitar, learning the scales takes no time at all (comparatively), but actualy knowning how to use the scales, what sounds good, what licks to play etc, is phrasing, and that takes ages to improve.
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#40
Quote by Elven_King
Yah, thanks for the lesson Soulja.. I already know all the box shapes and can play them, plus I do use octaves. But still I dont do it often and dont vary enough, i geuss its just me being lazy...

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