#1
Okay this is a long question so bear with me. Over the past few days I have been asking people about how to pick up my speed and technique and for the most part they are somewhat helpful. But all I have learned is what a semitone and a whole tone is. And that there are 7 modes to scales. But what the modes are I cant remeber. But thats all I know about scales. I cant sweep pick. I can alternate pick, but thats it.

Now I know everyone that posts in these forums is the next Randy Rhoads, but someone in here has to know exactly what I am going through because they went through it too. And I dont want stupid ass answers like "practice". I know that practice helps, but I need to know why something is before I go and memorize the whole thing. Or else it will never make any damn sense to me.

So will someone PLEASE tell me what I need to do. Books to read, websites to visit, people to talk to, or little magic fairies to screw. I am willing to sell my soul to play better. So will yall please help me.
#2
Ok. Calm down. If you're angry, youre not gonna get anywhere. To pickup speed you need to practice(I Know that you know this. Im just reiforcing it.) Use a metronome and start out very slowly and gradually increase speed.

As far as sweep pickining and all of those tecniques go: get a teacher.

If you want books I would recommend Shred Guitar by Paul Hanson. Its a great book that helped alot when I was in your situation.

Theory: cyberfret.net


Hope that helps. Good luck
#3
thanks for your help. I really do appreciate it. I like all of your ideas except the Teacher thing. I dont use teachers and never will. As I have said, if i cant do it myself then its not worth doing. I will check out the other links and books you suggested. But again thanks.
#4
Google is your friend. Google for "guitar method", google for "sweep picking lessons", google for "playing arpeggios", whatever you can think of - google for it. There's TONS of info on EVERY playing style out there, just waiting to be found. You just need a bit of patience to get your hands on all that stuff.

As for actually going through these lessons and learning them... Well... You're going to need waaaaay more patience than you currently are showing :p It WILL take you a loooong time before you actually learn anything.
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#5
This link was posted by someone on this site before (whoever posted it, give yourself credit here): http://www.zentao.com/guitar/

And i know you're gonna hate me for saying this, but...

practice.

Doesn't have to be for long, just enough to show improvement in whatever your doing (or whatever goal you're trying to reach, etc etc, however you want to put it). Just go through a couple scales with a metronome, and try to increase the BPM steadily (one day do 80, then 90, until you start to slow down, then just increase it by less). Scales can be useful for speed, warm-ups, etc, and will be useful when you learn how to improvise: that is, find what key you're playing in, and more or less pick notes from a scale. If you need anymore explaining just ask
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Last edited by Mitch72 at May 22, 2006,
#6
Quote by michaelh86
thanks for your help. I really do appreciate it. I like all of your ideas except the Teacher thing. I dont use teachers and never will. As I have said, if i cant do it myself then its not worth doing. I will check out the other links and books you suggested. But again thanks.
Your attitude toward teachers will seriously hamper your progress, almost certainly now and most certainly later. If you won't go to a teacher because you think there's nothing you can learn from one, you're simply pridefully ignorant. If you won't go because you think they're too expensive, bear in mind that the price a good teacher charges is far less expensive than what your frustration and lack of progress are costing you. Think about it.

Returning to your original question, here are some of the resources I use with my students...

* A Modern Method for Guitar by William Leavitt. I require all of my students to learn to read standard notation, and this is one of the very best books I've found for this purpose.
* Understanding How to Build Guitar Chords and Arpeggios by Michael Policastro. This book is simply outstanding.
* Jazz Guitar Single Note Soloing by the late, legendary Ted Greene. Most of my rock students bitch and moan when they first see the title of this book, and most are raving Ted Greene fans after about a month of working through Volume One.
* If a student is truly serious, we drill into Chord Chemistry, again by Ted Greene. Finishing this book earns you a Guitar Chord Ph.D.

Good luck.
gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#7
Do I need to know every single one of the scales. Or will I be ok know a few of them? Right now I am trying to learn the major pentatonics.
#8
Its not that I dont think there is anything worth learning from a teacher. And Im not ignorant. I just dont like paying someone to teach me how to do something I could learn on my own. There is a sense of prdie in doing it yourself.
#9
Quote by michaelh86
Its not that I dont think there is anything worth learning from a teacher. And Im not ignorant. I just dont like paying someone to teach me how to do something I could learn on my own. There is a sense of prdie in doing it yourself.
There's no shame in being ignorant. Ignorance is simply the state of not knowing something. I am woefully ignorant regarding brain surgery, cooking, botany, and a long list of other topics. You and everybody else on this planet are also woefully ignorant about an equally long list of topics. I happen to believe, based on your earlier post, that you're ignorant about the advantages of taking lessons from a good teacher, most likely because you've never had the pleasure of taking lessons from one.

I would encourage you to swallow your pride and check out the best guitar teacher in your area, based on recommendations and referrals from players you trust. I never charge a new student for the first lesson. I want him or her to feel comfortable with me and to get a sense that they're going to get their money's worth before they commit to the discipline of taking lessons. Perhaps a good teacher in your area will do the same for you.

In any case, good luck with your search for knowledge, and please keep us posted on your progress.

All the best,
gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#10
yeah that is a bit ignorant.......you do need a teacher

where would vai be today without satch?
#11
I will offer some advice. I've been in the same position and maybe some of this will
help you.

First of all, it's very likely you hit "the wall". Basically you have probably been
practicing the method I call "the way of least resistance". You have haphazardly
learned a good number of the less demanding guitar skills irregardless of what
constitutes good technique. You can actually progress a good ways by doing
this.

At some point, like now, you're wanting to learning more demanding things -- like
playing faster. Only, you can't! No matter what you try or what exercises you
practice, you can't play at any kind of speed at all without falling apart.

What has happened is that the more demanding things require EXPONENTIALLY
more skill. You are now trying to climb mountains after roaming the foothills.
You ignored the type of practice in the foothills that would prepare you for
the mountains, so you are now pretty much unequipped to scale them.

What you probably need to do -- what I found I needed to do -- was take a hard
look at the way I was playing and fix all the broken stuff. All the things I swept
under the rug. All the tensions. In short, learn how to practice and what to
practice.

So if that describes you, that's the type of thing you need to figure out.

Also, one final thing. Paradoxically, the way to speed is not playing fast. The
more you push that, the longer it will take you.
#12
Quote by michaelh86
Do I need to know every single one of the scales. Or will I be ok know a few of them? Right now I am trying to learn the major pentatonics.


You don't need to learn every single scale. Minor and Major Pentatonics are good to start on, and is be useful for bluesy kinda stuff (is useful to start out with). Other scales you might want to learn would just be minor and major scales, and try to get them down well.
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#13
Yeah like Mitch72 said u dont have to learn all that much. You can always do like Dimebag and just come up with your own scales! But of course if your in to Randy Rhoads you might want to go with the minor scale. Zakk Wylde leans more to minor pentatonic. But both are pretty much the foundation of shred. Oh, and they're all relative so A minor is C major and E minor is G major and so forth.
#14
Hotfret.com has some good scales. They even have a pick thung that will sound the note for you. They helped me alot when I learnt scales