#1
So I was just browsing around, and I saw an E7 alt

I've never really heard of alt chords before, and so I was just wondering what it was exactly.

Is there also an alt scale?
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#3
It means altered, I think.

Basically it is E7 plus any of the tensions, which are (I believe): b9, #9, b5, and b6.

Yes I looked at seljer's link and those are the notes.

And there is a scale I use called Superlocrian (although there are other names). It goes root, b2, b3, b4, b5, b6, b7. The b4 is enharmonically the same as the major 3rd in this instance, the b3 can be considered the #9, etc.
#4
Quote by psychodelia
Basically it is E7 plus any of the tensions, which are (I believe): b9, #9, b5, and b6.

Yes I looked at seljer's link and those are the notes.

But you'd have to call the b6 a #5, since you change the original 5 to it
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#6
The typical way to name it, although not common everywhere, is to say simply "E alt." "alt" implies dominance, and it's just a simplified way of telling the musicians playing the changes to play the altered dominant scale. The specific altered tones (b9, #9, b5, #5, #11) don't chnage the overall harmony of the piece, so they are usually omitted in the name. (Who wants to read the chord "E7b9#9+"? Not me!)


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