#1
I recently heard a few things by him, got hold of some tabs, the music is very good and the musicianship is amazing, some people think he spent his time trying to piss off pianists.

He used very odd polyrythmns and alot of chromatics etc, very nice stuff.

Just thought I'd send praise and such. as always, theres someone who has it due.
Originally posted by TapMaster
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#2
Yeah, he's pretty good...

Used to like him alot... But as with all classical (in general, not period or anything), I'm now turned off by it's rigidness.
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#5
I've heard he had huge hands.
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#6
^ was that from a girl, they tend to say stuff like that...but yeah he probably did.
Originally posted by TapMaster
If you break a JEM you know your going to go to hell when you die

Only member of the 'This is too immature for me' club.
#7
^hehe, it was from my (female) music teacher in fifth grade I believe.
Quote by hepzibahbaptist
Yeah listen to Apoc. He knows what he's talking about.


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I figured you were going to sig that. And this if you have any sense of humor what so ever.


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#8
I like some of his stuff, I'm personally more of a Bach and Vivaldi person though.
'If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch you must first invent the Universe' - Carl Sagan.
#9
I could never really get into Chopin. I'm a classical geek, but Chopin always came off as a little... I don't know, almost robotic. It seemed more technical stuff than anything melodic or enjoyable. I can't stand his Fantasia or whatever it is.
I think the only Chopin piece I've really thoroughly enjoyed is his Funeral March. Now that's a classical piece. Everything else, though, just didn't cut it for me.
#10
i enjoy listening to his ballads and his waltzes. i think they're amazing.

I've heard he had huge hands


probably, his pieces are extremely difficult to learn.
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#11
Maybe I just haven't given him enough of a chance. Compared to all the other classical music I listen to, Chopin just seems to be at the lower end of things. I can never see myself comparing any of his works to any of Bach's, you know?
#12
Ballade in G minor, Op 23 No. 1 is soooo beautiful. i just love every second of it. it brings me to tears, literally.


i also like the minute waltz, i think that's what it's called. i think it's also called "petit chien"
The trouble with nude dancing is that not everything stops moving when the music does.

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#13
Yeah.... but can he play CRUNK?!!!
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#15
Quote by SethMegadefan
Maybe I just haven't given him enough of a chance. Compared to all the other classical music I listen to, Chopin just seems to be at the lower end of things. I can never see myself comparing any of his works to any of Bach's, you know?

i think Bach is more mechanical if anything. any Baroque really seems to have set up a fairly rigid with the almost strict use of polyphony, counterpoint, basso continuo and terraced dynamics. i still find some Baroque nice though...Vivaldi's Four Seasons and some Brandenburg Concertos are awesome. i love the Liszt's stuff (transcendental etudes are the best), but if anything you could accuse HIM of being a robotic composer because many of his pieces were so virtuousic. however, the amazing dynamics of his pieces, the "dolces" as well as the fortissimos (all probably in the same piece...see TE #4 "Mazeppa") in his compositions just make his pieces so much more emotive.

as for Chopin...i can easily tell a Chopin piano concerto apart from other concertos when i hear them on the radio, even though he wrote, relatively speaking, few. his stuff is amazing, even his etudes, known for being very pedantic and concentrated in the techniques, are still amazing. Op. 10 Nos. 3 "Tristesse", 4, 6, 12 "Revolutionary" and Op. 25 Nos. 5, 10, 11 come to mind immediately. the nocturnes are amazing also, though a bit formulaic, are still some of the most emotive pieces for the piano (i'm not classically trained or anything, but i'm learning Nocturne 15 in F-minor right now). and i'd say Polonaise Fantasie (not to be confused with Fantasie Impromtu) has to be one of the best piano pieces i've heard. there's something 20th century about it, while still Romantic in the best sense. so yeah...i like Chopin's works haha.
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#16
Quote by phobos
i think Bach is more mechanical if anything. any Baroque really seems to have set up a fairly rigid with the almost strict use of polyphony, counterpoint, basso continuo and terraced dynamics.

I know what you mean, and in the whole scheme of Baroque music, you're exactly right. But Bach has always been so much more than just Baroque to me. I feel exactly the same way about the rigid, almost robotic vibe strictly generic Baroque music creates, but Bach has seemed to be one of the most inventive and unique composers ever. "Toccata & Fugue in D Minor" is probably as un-Baroque as you can possibly get.
So I agree with you on Baroque. I disagree, however, on your views of Bach. He was a pure genius; he basically pioneered counterpoint, and was undoubtedly one of the most influential composers ever.
#17
Quote by SethMegadefan
So I agree with you on Baroque. I disagree, however, on your views of Bach. He was a pure genius; he basically pioneered counterpoint, and was undoubtedly one of the most influential composers ever.

i won't disagree with you on that...the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is amazing, as well as the Art of the Fugue with Contrapunctus IX and, as mentioned above, the Brandenburg Concertos which seem to crack the shell of Baroque (but Vivaldi's Four Season's smashes the shell for me haha). Bach is the heart and soul of Baroque, sometimes that's a great thing, and sometimes it's not as inspiring as some other pieces may be. i'll take Chopin's etudes over the Inventions any day.
Quote by Iluvpowerchords
I like:

Phobos (he oozes cool)


Misfits and AC/DC Covers + original recordings (jazz/punk, hardcore, "shredish").
http://advancederror.dmusic.com
#18
Quote by phobos
i won't disagree with you on that...the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is amazing, as well as the Art of the Fugue with Contrapunctus IX and, as mentioned above, the Brandenburg Concertos which seem to crack the shell of Baroque (but Vivaldi's Four Season's smashes the shell for me haha). Bach is the heart and soul of Baroque, sometimes that's a great thing, and sometimes it's not as inspiring as some other pieces may be. i'll take Chopin's etudes over the Inventions any day.

Sure, sure. Your musical opinion seems to have great reasons backing it up, so I can't argue with an educated opinion like that.
#19
Quote by HelpImARock
Yeah.... but can he play CRUNK?!!!



you kiddin bra?chopin STAY crunk


he too wild
#20
Just thought id revive this thread (did a little chopin search)

He actually had pretty small hands, he was only about 5 foot 4/5 tall, and his hand span wasnt that great, my guitar/piano teacher visited warsaw and went to the museum etc.

The piano keys in those days were slighty smaller though so i guess that makes up for it.
Tears in waves, minds on fire
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#21
^ there are some pianos with really bizarre keyboards which make a lot of pieces a lot easier, and turn an octave stretch into the equivalent of a sixth. Can't remember any construction details or names though...
#22
bach/czerny was too mechanical for me to learn on the piano.

i really enjoyed chopin though. The pieces my seem to mechanical to some, but i think the emotion put into chopin's pieces are transparent.

not a huge fan of mozart (piano wise), liked some beethoven pieces etc.
#23
i only have a few pieces, including the second sonata and the 24 preludes, but they're phenomenal. the second sonata is one of the greatest piano works i have heard.
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#24
Quote by sirpsycho85
i only have a few pieces, including the second sonata and the 24 preludes, but they're phenomenal. the second sonata is one of the greatest piano works i have heard.


beethoven?
#25
Quote by Supern00b
beethoven?


Chopin wrote 4 sonatas.
Tears in waves, minds on fire
Nights alone by your side
#27
www.ourchopin.com

Thats a really good site with a full (and free to download) catalouge of recording of all his works.

Also ive just ordered the book chopin letters from amazon, anyone read it?
Tears in waves, minds on fire
Nights alone by your side
#30
Quote by fronkpies
www.ourchopin.com

Thats a really good site with a full (and free to download) catalouge of recording of all his works.

Also ive just ordered the book chopin letters from amazon, anyone read it?



That's a phenomenal site. Listening to the stuff, i'd put him and beethoven ahead of anything else i've heard for the piano, but i am also just getting into classical music.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
#31
Quote by sirpsycho85
but i am also just getting into classical music.


Yer im the same (learning piano)

I think chopin can be much more accessible than many other composers, he's sort of easy to listen to, and in a way pretty avante garde, especially for the times.
Tears in waves, minds on fire
Nights alone by your side
#33
ive been playing piano for years and years....like 9 years now...i think..just got into grade 8!! anyways I play some of Chopin's stuff and i absolutely love evry one of his songs...i also did a school project on him and i found it interesting learning about the life of such an amazing musician
#34
Quote by sirpsycho85
That's a phenomenal site. Listening to the stuff, i'd put him and beethoven ahead of anything else i've heard for the piano, but i am also just getting into classical music.

i recommend some Liszt. he was a contemporary of Chopin's and were friends for a time. but that doesn't really translate into the music...Liszt has some super-human stuff for the piano, if possibly less emotional for the sake of musical technicality (that's up to your interpretation).
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I like:

Phobos (he oozes cool)


Misfits and AC/DC Covers + original recordings (jazz/punk, hardcore, "shredish").
http://advancederror.dmusic.com
#35
^i like what i've heard of liszt before, i'll probably check him out in the near future. i'm sorta trying to simultaneously get into jazz and classical music, along with those must listen rock albums i have not heard yet, meaning i only really have time for the major artists at first. so yeah i should get to liszt soon, certainly if i go for piano music first.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me