#2
Memorize the lines and spaces and then just dedicate some time to practicing it. It isn't the most fun thing to practice, but it can be very helpful to know how to read sheet music.
#3
learn where C notes are at, first learn middle C on the F/Treble clef. that is on the ledger below the botton 5th line.


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This is Middle C (C3) on Music notation, learn this note and work your way up and down. Learn the location of the other C notes and you'll have a easier time remembering the other notes because you can base them on how many lines appart they are from C.

thats one of the ways I learned.
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#4
well, there's always the classic pnuemonic devices:

treble clef:
lines from bottom to top: Every Good Boy Does Fine
spaces from bottom to top: FACE

bass clef:
lines bottom to top: Good Boys Deserve Fudge Always
spaces bottom to top: All Cows Eat Grass

And then three that are pretty easy to remember:
G is circled by the little loop in the treble clef itself
F is between the two dots on the bass clef
Middle C is on the first ledger line below the treble staff and the first above the bass staff.

and for you viola players out there: middle C is on the little dimple of the tenor clef (tenor clef is used rarely and only for certain instruments)
#5
I suggest buying William Leavitt: A modern method for guitar volume 1. If you're through that, try volume 2 and 3 and I believe there's even a version which has scale practice exercises in it (not to sure about that)

Those have helped me a lot
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#6
One way (although more expensive :S) would be to have a teacher run you through it, and just go over the notes. Best way would be to buy a book and just go through it probably...
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#7
Quote by elvenkindje
I suggest buying William Leavitt: A modern method for guitar volume 1. If you're through that, try volume 2 and 3 and I believe there's even a version which has scale practice exercises in it (not to sure about that)

Those have helped me a lot



I'll second that recommendation, and add that any of the basic guitar methodologies (Mel Bay, Hal Leonard, Alfred's, etc) are also a good way to learn how to read.

That and, of course, lessons! A teacher can make the process much easier to understand.