#1
......The Difference between Major and Minor in music and how to identify them please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - it's spinning me out!!!

thanx
Evill Olval
>><<
Last edited by Evill Olval at May 22, 2006,
#2
The main difference between major and minor is the 3rd interval.
In a basic Major triad, it has the intervals 1 3 5... notice the Major 3rd.
In a basic minor triad, it has the intervals 1 b3 5... notice the Minor 3rd.

This also applies to scales.
Minor chords / scales tend to sound 'sad'
Whereas Major chords / scales dont.
Been away, am back
#3
sorryyyyyyyyyy......... but could you tell me that in mong......... , i'm kind of dim witted atm...... sorry..........that just completely blanked to me lol
>><<
#4
Major and Minor are Scales. Scales are guides for which notes to hit while soloing or improvising.

This is how it goes
W= whole step(2 frets)
H = half step(1 fret)
--------------------------------------------------------
Major is WWHWWWH

Therefore, if your root note is E which is fret 0
then major scale on one string would be
0-2-4-5-7-9-11-12
------------------------------------------------------------
Minor is WHWWHWW
then E minor scale on one string would be
0-2-3-5-7-8-10-12
--------------------------------------------------------------
even more info :

Major is Ionian
Minor is Aeolian

The Dorian Scale is just one letter above Ionian(Major)

If Ionian is WWHWWWH
then Dorian would be WHWWWHW

Its like that, I don't know all the scales but Minor is Aeolian, which is 6 letters above Ionian.


And BTW : Major has a happy feeling, Minor has a sad feeling


Sorry if my explanation is bad, I'm not a teacher, but that is basically what you need to know.
#5
the best way to remember which is that major chords sound happy and mnor chords sound sad.
#6
thanx that's helpful enuff but 1 more thing...... what would i do when i try to scale up a string....?????

and if i'm right then the E major scale on The 6th string is

E(0) F#(2) G#(4)..... etc????
>><<
#8
Yes, you are right, but E# and B# are imaginary .

E# = F, B# = C

Therefore C major has no sharps(#) or flats(b)

EDIT : I'm too lazy to explain the 6 string scales, so just look for a lesson somewhere. There are TONS on cyberfret.com

EDIT numbah 2: E# and B# are imaginary , sorry I goofed up
Last edited by Cheesepuff at May 22, 2006,
#9
Quote by Cheesepuff
Yes, you are right, but F# and B# are imaginary .

F# = G, B# = C

Therefore C major has no sharps(#) or flats(b)


Um, no they're not...

G = G
C = C
F# = F#
B# = B#

There is no E# or C# however.
#11
Quote by Cheesepuff
Yes, you are right, but F# and B# are imaginary .

F# = G, B# = C

Therefore C major has no sharps(#) or flats(b)


how is F# G?

F# is G flat
#13
Its common practice to use INTERVALS, not STEPs to describe scales.

Intervals are used to number notes in a scale.
If you take your C Major scale for instance, it has the notes:
C D E F G A B C

Each one of those is assigned a number from 1 to 7:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C


Look at the number 3, and the note which accompanies it. The number is just 3, on its own. This means its a Major 3rd.

If you took the minor scale:

1  2 b3  4  5 b6 b7  1
C  D Eb  F  G Ab Bb  C


Now look at the same number. It has a 'b' before it. This means its a MINOR third. All that 'b' means is flat, you need to make that note flat. Therefore, we take E, and put a b after it:

E -> Eb.

Quote by Cheesepuff
Yes, you are right, but E# and B# are imaginary .


There not imagenary, there just not used all the time.
Been away, am back
#14
Quote by Logz
There not imagenary, there just not used all the time.


are you saying that there is such a thing as a E# and B#? well... i can see that with bends... (1/4 bend) but for just picking notes or hammeron/pull off... not happening unless your out of tune bad.
#15
^ Yes i am.

They come into alot of theory. The best example i can give is a diatonic scale.
Diatonic means you need to use each note in the scale.

Therefore, it would be improper to use A then A# for example, to make that diatonic, you would have to write: A then Bb.


Diatonic G# Major scale: Note the B# and E#
G# A# B# C# D# E# F##

It would be improper to write the G# major scale like this:

G# Major scale: Not Diatonic
G# A# C C# D# F F## G#


Of course this is an extremely simple use of it.

EDIT: and im never out of tune
Been away, am back
Last edited by Logz at May 22, 2006,