#1
I have this old samick body from my first guitar. I took it apart like a year ago for some reason.. I was wondering if its good enough to use on a strat project.. Does the type of wood really make that big of a difference?

Now lets try not to get off track about how big of a noob i am this time..


#2
The type of wood makes a huge difference, and I can't see anything in that picture, try taking a better one.
#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
The type of wood makes a huge difference, and I can't see anything in that picture, try taking a better one.

ok
#6
Quote by call1800ksmyazz
it looks really crappy. especially the paint job. but im pretty sure the wood is bad.

lmao i think its ply wood.. i really didnt think it made a difference.. o well thought it was worth a shot to try and save a 100 bucks
#7
I mean, it might be cool to do stuff to it if you dont want it. You wont really gain much from building something from it though, except experience. You could make a really cool paint job on it though and then make the guitar look all cool even though its crappo, and then hang it up. People will be like "whoa! thats a cool looking guitar! can i try to play it?" and you can say "you arent worthy of it". But if you want to actually be able to play it and have it sound nice, buy new wood or a new body.
#8
Quote by call1800ksmyazz
I mean, it might be cool to do stuff to it if you dont want it. You wont really gain much from building something from it though, except experience. You could make a really cool paint job on it though and then make the guitar look all cool even though its crappo, and then hang it up. People will be like "whoa! thats a cool looking guitar! can i try to play it?" and you can say "you arent worthy of it". But if you want to actually be able to play it and have it sound nice, buy new wood or a new body.

haha yes man. I was thinking about painting it 2moro.. i dont even know how to go about doing that... just buy some spray cans? or do i need a air brush and all that for a good job?
#9
The wood does matter. The heavier, more dense the wood is, the better sound you get because the strings won't vibrate the body and it turn won't vibrate the pickups so they can perfectly catch the signal of the moving strings.

If it is a lighter, less dense material, such as playwood, the body will surely shake and so will the pickups and they will not properly get the string's signal. The end.


BTW- If you can lift it, lead would be the perfect material for a great sounding guitar, but it might mess with the electronics.
#10
Quote by LJTPerry
The wood does matter. The heavier, more dense the wood is, the better sound you get because the strings won't vibrate the body and it turn won't vibrate the pickups so they can perfectly catch the signal of the moving strings.

If it is a lighter, less dense material, such as playwood, the body will surely shake and so will the pickups and they will not properly get the string's signal. The end.


BTW- If you can lift it, lead would be the perfect material for a great sounding guitar, but it might mess with the electronics.

What about alder?
#11
I'm not sure about each type of wood, I just know why the wood has to be dense :P
#12
LJTPerry - No, just No. It is not the density that a "better sound" different types of wood make different sounds. Swamp Ash is an extremely porus wood, but it sounds great. Rock Maple is an extremely dense wood, but if you make the entire guitar out of it, it sounds like crap. So Yes, Andrewsonfire Alder is a "good" wood, personally for me it is a little bright, but I'm not much of a strat man. A good, quick starter guide for woods and their sounds is http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/options/options_bodywoods.cfm . So different woods make different sounds, although traditionally the fewer pieces of the wood (ex. one piece body sounds "better" then 15 layers of the shredded pulp wood that makes up plywood). For a strat sound traditionally Alder is used, but every once and a while Ash (personally I like ash better). So your best bet is to research your wood choices around you, see what matches the sound you want and then buy it and start building.
#13
My bad, I had some serious misinformation there. I'm gonna have to look up my source.