#1
probally a stupid thread but what ever

what are some things i should invest in? (metronome)

how much does a guitar have to do with speed? (mines epi lp speciall II )

are scales a good way to build up speed and finger strength (i only the know blues scale)

what are other good ways to start shreding?


btw i've only been playing a year+ so im just looking for a starting point
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Quote by gunther_sucks
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Except for the sexy man goatee, and kickass shades. And sweet guitar.

I'm jealous.
Last edited by Vandaliztik at May 23, 2006,
#2
Yeah, you got everything covered. A metronome, start off very slow, then use scales (also helps for sweep picking) and then just increase the speed and before you know (which will be awhile so keep it up!) you'll be shredding up your guitar.

Your guitar is fine by the way.
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Want to build a Jackson, to be fairly freaking honest.

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#3
Yeah, get a metronome of sorts if you haven't got one.
You can just a an online on http://www.metronomeonline.com/ or set up a click track in Audacity or other record program if you dont one.

Guitar? I practice on my crappy Squier think of it this way: if you learn to play fast a a bad guitar imagine what you could do on one that plays like butter
Les Pauls aren't fine, Buckethead does some amazing stuff on his one.
Having a low action is reccomended but not required. Yngwie Malmsteen has got a pretty high action on his guitars, so does Stevie Ray Vaughn (not a shredder but he could play damn fast)

As far as how to start:
Practice. I personally started with the Steve Vai 10 hour workout thing which has got some decent excercises.
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=347495&highlight=stretch
Just practice your basic alternate picking, just on some basic patterns to warm up. After that go through all the scales you know (more than just the blues scale, learn all the modes). I like to mix up what I do everyday (so some days alternate picking, some days alternate picking with string skipping, weird chord voicings, legato!, tapping, sweep picking....)

Make sure whatever you're doing is clean and precise, no sloppyness. No need to rush into the high bpms. You get the speed from being able to do really accurate and precise movements at slower speeds.
Last edited by seljer at May 23, 2006,
#4
yeah plenty of people can and do shred on les pauls. your guitar only limits you by how much you let it limit you (if you think you cant shred on it then you never will).

scales are going to be your best choice, learn them fowards and backwards and then start slowly building speed with a metronome. another great thing would be to learn alot of chords, especially the harder jazz chords and voicings, as this will greatly increase dexterity and strength.
Originally posted by Mad Marius
You've broken a low E string??? What style do you play, guitar raping noise core?
#5
Quote by seljer

think of it this way: if you learn to play fast a a bad guitar imagine what you could do on one that plays like butter



You would have to get use to the neck, thus leading yourself back to the old guitar, and mailing your new one to australia!

You've got yourself covered there. With everything. 2 words that will go with you throughout your entire shred life

ALTERNATE PICKING. Use it, abuse it, and cheat on it with sweep and economic (two very attractive words that you'll get to learn soon)
#6
As everyone else stated, gotta start at slow speed and work your way up. You won't get anywhere if you try to rush into it fast. If you want my honest opinion, shredding is fine, but you can't get too carried away with it. I use to be crazy about trying to shred, but found that it was better to focus more on the song itself. Don't get me wrong, I love shredding, but too much of it is pointless.
#8
any idea how many years does it take you guys from a pure guitar idoit to a average guitarist who can shred?
#9
Quote by TWJ
any idea how many years does it take you guys from a pure guitar idoit to a average guitarist who can shred?

if you're practicing thoroughly about 2 hours a day you can rather fast in a year or so
#10
^Seconded. I've been playing a year, and while I pretty much can't shred, I can solo fairly alright. And I practice about an hour a day.
#11
practise playing scales as just hamer ons a pull offs, you'll sound quicker faster. And are you sure shred is where u want to go ? If you only know the blues scale then you probably dont fully understand the hard work and slow progress needed to become a shredder, go try some blues and stuff, and dont worry about shred for another 2 years.
#12
Quote by Danno13
^Seconded. I've been playing a year, and while I pretty much can't shred, I can solo fairly alright. And I practice about an hour a day.


Danno, youve only been playing for a year?? damn! i had you picked for playing for a couple of years at least, cause you know so damn bloody much! lol
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#13
^Er... yeah. I can't really play for anything, I'm more a tone guy at the moment.
#14
meh i learned alot in a year. I can shred from the 1st fret up to the 24th fret pretty easily. and as others said, I alternate pick down. That steve vai workout is amazing, give it a try.

I use a Ibanez for shred and im getting a Gibson in winter time for other stuff and also will shred on it, if im lazy to switch guitars that is (i shred on it in my guitar store so i dont think it will be hard).
[img]http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/9672/stevevaisigver24vf.jpg[/img]
Just an influence.
#15
Quote by seljer
if you're practicing thoroughly about 2 hours a day you can rather fast in a year or so


I'm sorry, don't want to offend, but that's crap.

There aren't any guarantees. If your practice habits aren't very good (as in
consistently practicing the right kind of things in the right way), you'll most likely
never get very good.

So, don't expect that after playing X years, there's a magic moment when you
suddenly receive your shred diploma. Doesn't work that way.

Bad technique will allow you to progress fairly far when playing fairly undemanding
kind of stuff. You may even learn a simple trick or two. But there will come a
point where if you try doing more demanding things, you will be totally unable
to play it because you haven't laid the groundwork. At that point, if you really
love playing, you'll have to fix all the broken stuff. If your desire isn't that
strong you'll end up resigning to the fact you're not going to get much better and
may drop guitar entirely. I was in the latter category for quite a while.
#16
Quote by edg
I'm sorry, don't want to offend, but that's crap.

There aren't any guarantees. If your practice habits aren't very good (as in
consistently practicing the right kind of things in the right way), you'll most likely
never get very good.

So, don't expect that after playing X years, there's a magic moment when you
suddenly receive your shred diploma. Doesn't work that way.

Bad technique will allow you to progress fairly far when playing fairly undemanding
kind of stuff. You may even learn a simple trick or two. But there will come a
point where if you try doing more demanding things, you will be totally unable
to play it because you haven't laid the groundwork. At that point, if you really
love playing, you'll have to fix all the broken stuff. If your desire isn't that
strong you'll end up resigning to the fact you're not going to get much better and
may drop guitar entirely. I was in the latter category for quite a while.

Listen to this guy. He's definitley right. I began taking guitar lessons in the 6th grade, and learned a good amount of things. By 7th grade, I was a decent player. I was very much into guitar that year. By 8th grade, I didn't feel as though I was advancing much, and stopped playing all the time. By the time high scholl rolled around, I dropped guitar and moved on. I didn't even once take a look at my guitar sophomore year of high school. I'm a junior now, and am just getting heavily into the guitar again. This time though, I'm not being forced to take classical lessons; therefore, I am learning what I want at the pace I want. Some days I will attempt a song, others I will attempt to write a song, and on other days I will practice scales. I play for fun, and am learning at a good pace now. I have an advantage, of course, but I also forgot a lot of things. One thing I know though is that I'll be able to strum for the rest of my life, and thats all that really counts. There's good music to be made at any level of playing, so don't stress over being insane or anything. It's not that important. Eventually, you'll wake up one day, and realize how good you have gotten. That's it man. Good things come to those who wait.
The times they are a changin'.....
#17
Quote by edg
I'm sorry, don't want to offend, but that's crap.

There aren't any guarantees. If your practice habits aren't very good (as in
consistently practicing the right kind of things in the right way), you'll most likely
never get very good.

So, don't expect that after playing X years, there's a magic moment when you
suddenly receive your shred diploma. Doesn't work that way.

Bad technique will allow you to progress fairly far when playing fairly undemanding
kind of stuff. You may even learn a simple trick or two. But there will come a
point where if you try doing more demanding things, you will be totally unable
to play it because you haven't laid the groundwork. At that point, if you really
love playing, you'll have to fix all the broken stuff. If your desire isn't that
strong you'll end up resigning to the fact you're not going to get much better and
may drop guitar entirely. I was in the latter category for quite a while.


I meant that as from the start of learning to "shred" forwards (and that you don't screw up too badly with practicing habits). If you start with the goal of shredding from day one you're going to have to get the basics over first (chances are you don't really get into shred until you actually start playing and search around for the virtuoso guitarists...).
And I didn't mean that after 1 year you'd automatically be a übershredder that'd be playing like Rusty Cooley, theres still a long way to go after that to get to that kind level.
#18
damn edg, that sucks, man, i always had those feelings of "I feel like i suck badly" moments and it turns out that i got a offdays for like....2 days?? I wasnt sure 1 or 2 days it was miserable . But i decided not to give up and i had to fix most of my sweeps and even try better to accurately pick up and down, by the way my last post i meant alternative picking down & up (sorry if someone read my post). Anyways never give up on it, or you = looser
[img]http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/9672/stevevaisigver24vf.jpg[/img]
Just an influence.
#19
i hear that caffine makes your fingers move faster.......just kidding.
#20
Well, I don't want to come off like a know it all as I don't know it all. The guitar
is a neverending process of discovery, which is REALLY what it's all about. But,
I did start playing, like 30 years ago (doh!), so I have learned a thing or two
in that time. I used to play a LOT and stopped entirely for about 10 years.

I see people making the same sorts of bad assumptions about playing guitar and
most likely it will end you up in the exact same spot. I'm just trying to help others
avoid the same fate and save a lot of time. When I started up again a few years
ago, I made it a point to find out everything I could about how great guitarists
play the way they do and how to practice and if necessary rip apart the things
I was doing wrong and start over again.

Now, while I still have up and down days, my progress is INSANE compared to
what it used to be. And it was all so very simple. Basically it's all about HOW
you go about practicing. Do that right, and you can go as far as you want.

It's a lot about what most would consider the "boring" stuff. I used to as well.
You practice some scales or real slow technique stuff and you think you'll never
actually use it when you play because it seems so mechanical and lifeless.

The thing is, you stick with the "boring" stuff for a bit and give it a chance to
work (it doesn't happen overnight) and you start getting some victories and
suddenly -- hey this isn't so boring! When you see results, it becomes fun.
Now, you can't keep me away from scale & technique practice. I do that stuff
for hours and hours every day and I ENJOY it.

Mind, Body and Spirit. All three need to work in concert. Most people want to jump
right to the Spirit part and wail. But, without the right Mind & Body training
your spirit outlet will always be limited. Now, when I actually PLAY, the connection
between my spirit with the guitar through my mind and body is much tighter
and I can explore things I never could before. And it gets better every day.

So, all this is my rather long winded way of saying, Learn to play WELL, not FAST.
Figure out how to practice (www.guitarprinciples.com rocks!). FAST will take
care of itself if you take care of the WELL part.
#21
my 'shred' gear:
modelling amp with metronome to plug into the pc (to acess faults andreocrd etc.
metronome
ibanez jem
fender strat
ME!

thats it