#1
Im trying to think up examples of melodys/riffs for all intervals to make memorising them easier eg-Minor 2nd =Jaws, Perfect 5th= Star Wars theme (1st two notes). Any other good examples?...
#2
sounds like it could make memorizing them harder to me
Quote by sonixon
I'll say.
They were originally going make Claudio a part of Mount Rushmore, but the material was not tough enough to sculpt his hair out of.

Quote by thefinalcut
"St. Anger" was done in Drop Z tuning, they were trying to "out heavy" Slipknot.
#3
perfect 4th = Here Comes The Bride

octave = Led Zeppelin - Immigrant song
not a hard one

minor seventh = Red Hot Chili Peppers - Can't stop

major seventh = Porcupine Tree - Signify

thirds = get the sounds of the major and minor triads into your head (played seperatley too, not all at once, like if you were to sing it)
#4
# Unison - A unison is the same note as the root note, simple as that, can't get any more basic than that.

There is no easy way of identifying this interval, its just 2 consecutive notes.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|--------------|
B|--------------|
G|--------------|
D|--------------|
A|---0--OR------|
E|---5------5-5-|

# Minor Second/Augmented Unison - abbreviated m2, is a half step up from the root. A good way to identify this interval is the part in Jaws... da dun... da dun... etc. Or you can come up with something else that has a minor second interval to help you identify it.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|--------------|
B|--------------|
G|--------------|
D|--------------|
A|---1--OR------|
E|---5------5-6-|

# Major Second/Diminished Third - abbreviated M2, is a whole step up from the root, or the 2nd note of the scale. Can be identified by the 2nd and 3rd note of Happy Birthday.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|--------------|
B|--------------|
G|--------------|
D|--------------|
A|---2--OR------|
E|---5------5-7-|

# Minor Third/Augmented Second - abbreviated m3, is a whole step and a half step from the root note. This note is what identifies a minor scale. Meaning if you see this interval, 95% of the time you are playing in a minor key. An example of a Minor Third are the first 2 notes of Iron Man, or Smoke on the Water.

6th String Root (root as A)

e--------------|
B--------------|
G--------------|
D--------------|
A---3--OR------|
E---5------5-8-|

# Major Third/Diminished Fourth - abbreviated M3, is 2 whole steps from the root note. This interval identifies a Major Scale, meaning if you see this interval, 95% of the time your playing in a minor key. An example of a Major Third are the 3rd and 4th notes of the Star Spangled Banner.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|--------------|
B|--------------|
G|--------------|
D|--------------|
A|---4--OR------|
E|---5------5-9-|

# Perfect Fourth/Augmented Third - abbreviated P4, is 2 whole steps and a half step from the root note. The Fourth is a semi-tone up from the Major Third. When substituting the Fourth for a Third in a major chord, the chord becomes a sus4 chord (think of the Open D Major chord xx0232 and the Open Dsus4 chord xx0233). Fourths are also adjacent notes on the E-G strings while acsending. A good way to recognize a Perfect Fourth interval is the "Here Comes the Bride" song.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---------------|
A|---5--OR-------|
E|---5------5-10-|

# Diminished Fifth/Augmented Fourth - abbreviated º5, also called a Tri-tone, is halfway between the root note and the octave, or 6 half steps or 3 whole steps. The diminished fifth is a very dissonant sounding interval. The diminished fifth can be used as a quick leading tone to the perfect fifth, a half step higher. This interval is used to make a diminished chord. There really isn't a great way that I know of to recognize this interval except the song from Westside Story, Maria. Ma(p1)-ri(º5)-a(p5). (try it yourself).

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---------------|
A|---6--OR-------|
E|---5------5-11-|

# Perfect Fifth/Power Chord/Diminished 6th - or P5, is the most widely used interval in Rock 'n' Roll. It is 3 whole steps and a half steps away from the root note. This is your basic power chord interval. It is a very solid sounding interval when played along with the root. The fifth is also part of any major or minor triad, which consists of the Root, the Major or Minor third, and the Perfect Fifth. The way can recognize a perfect Fifth interval is the Star Wars Theme song. I have a friend who recognizes this interval by the song by Usher, "Yeah".

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---------------|
A|---7--OR-------|
E|---5------5-12-|

# Minor Sixth/Fifth - or a m6, is 4 wholesteps from the root note. This is also very dissonant sounding. There isn't much to say about this interval except for it is good as a descending leading down, going down a step. I really can't think of a good way to recognize this interval. Sorry :/

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---------------|
A|---8--OR-------|
E|---5------5-13-|

# Major Sixth/Diminished Seventh - or a M6, is 3 half steps below the octave. This interval when played as a chord sounds good in an acoustic type setting. An easy way to recognize this is the little NBC jingle when they are about to show weather. If you don't know what I'm talking about, or you don't live in the US, then try playing the D string, then the B string, then the G string about a second apart from each other. The D and B are a Major Sixth interval.

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---4-----------|
A|-----OR---9----|
E|---5------5----|

# Minor Seventh/Augmented sixth - or an m7, is one of the most important intervals of JAZZ. This is a flat seventh which is a whole step below the octave, which makes a chord dominant. A Major chord, when added with this Flat Seven, becomes dominant and sounds jazzy and slightly dissonant. The V chord in all keys is dominant like this, and when moving to the Tonic chord becomes a Cadence, or a resolving progression (sorry if this confuses you, I don't expect people reading this article to fully understand everything I say). I don't really have a good way to remember this either, but can be identified just by knowing the sound the interval makes.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---5-----------|
A|-----OR---10---|
E|---5------5----|

# Major Seventh/Diminished Octave - or an M7, is the leading tone to the octave, meaning it is a half step below. The leading tone quality of this interval is nice because it can make a Harmonic Minor scale by making the minor 7 into this major 7. It just has good resolving qualities. This one is easy to hear because it is just dissonant to hear it is right next to the octave.

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---6-----------|
A|-----OR---11---|
E|---5------5----|

# Octave/Augmented Seventh - or a P8, is just the octave higher than the root note, that simple. The only example I can think of right now is Over The Rainbow from the Wizard of Oz, but it doesn't take a maestro to identify this interval

6th String Root (root as A)

e|---------------|
B|---------------|
G|---------------|
D|---7-----------|
A|-----OR---12---|
E|---5------5----|


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#6
i'd learn them by shape alot quicker and easier. Or by ear, I know a 3rd a 4th or a 5th when I hear one. The rest you dont really need to know, they should come naturally, you dont have to be that specific about not choice. You'll eventually just know what fits.