#1
What scales are considered necessary to memorize? I know the Major scale, the Minor Pentatonic, and the Natural minor right now. What others should I learn? Should I just memorize every scale I can find, or are there a few essential ones?
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#2
It would be best in the long run to understand a scale rather then just memorizing it.. I mean, do you know what the scale does if you flatten the 7th and stuff like that or are you just memorizing patterns?.. could you play the scale all on one string.. or how about 2 strings.. If you change tunings on the strings, (D-G-D-G-B-E) could you play a scale then? Try to take the scales you have now (Which are the good ones, you've learnt the right stuff for starts) and really understand it.
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#6
Quote by Ghost Shadow
I would say, C-A-G-E-D


When exactly did that become a scale? Must have missed that

Anyways, look into major, minor, pentatonic minor, harmonic minor for a start.

Then start looking at modes when you feel as though you have sufficient mastery over what you've studied. Good luck.
#7
sorry if i go a bit off the subject but i wanted to ask this and i dont want to make a thread
i thought when you learned a scale the key of the scale was determined by what not you started on so like if you played one key starting at the 12th fret its an e right? i got a book full of scales however and it shows a different way to play it for each key. i know you can move the pentatonic everywhere because thats what i do, but i was wondering just how this works because this will be hard if i not only have to learn the major scale but learn it in every key...
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#9
Quote by Mental Militia
sorry if i go a bit off the subject but i wanted to ask this and i dont want to make a thread
i thought when you learned a scale the key of the scale was determined by what not you started on so like if you played one key starting at the 12th fret its an e right? i got a book full of scales however and it shows a different way to play it for each key. i know you can move the pentatonic everywhere because thats what i do, but i was wondering just how this works because this will be hard if i not only have to learn the major scale but learn it in every key...


Hm, you definitely need some scale help.

First of all, the pentatonic is a scale and so is the major, minor, etc... They ALL have
different notes. However, like the pentatonic positions which can be shifted to
change key, every other scale has finger positions as well which can also be
shifted to change key. The all work alike.

If your book shows different ways to play the same scale for each key, I'm
guessing it's because it's showing you one position on the fretboard.

For instance, I could play a C major scale starting at the 8th fret using one of
the finger positions (or "boxes") and if I wanted to play it in G I'd slide it down
to the 3rd fret and play the same thing there.
#10
Quote by slybeans
Scales?

I don't understand!


A scale is just a series of notes which "make sense" when played after each other.
Try this

e---------------------5-8----
B-----------------5-8--------
G-------------5-7------------
D---------5-7----------------
A-----5-7--------------------
E-5-8------------------------


That's the Pentataonic Minor scale in A
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Last edited by frenchyfungus at May 24, 2006,
#11
You need to learn as many scales as possible. Never limit yourself to a few specific scales.
#12
Quote by horazonblade
It would be best in the long run to understand a scale rather then just memorizing it.. I mean, do you know what the scale does if you flatten the 7th and stuff like that or are you just memorizing patterns?.. could you play the scale all on one string.. or how about 2 strings.. If you change tunings on the strings, (D-G-D-G-B-E) could you play a scale then? Try to take the scales you have now (Which are the good ones, you've learnt the right stuff for starts) and really understand it.

i dont know all that youre talking about. is there any lessons on this site for this stuff? and ive always wanted to know. when you see scales on a page its in one position.but solos are played all over the fretboard.how do you know where else to play and how do you transfer from one position to another?
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#13
Quote by marvelboy_04
i dont know all that youre talking about. is there any lessons on this site for this stuff? and ive always wanted to know. when you see scales on a page its in one position.but solos are played all over the fretboard.how do you know where else to play and how do you transfer from one position to another?


Usually you start by learning all the positions of a scale. These are just fingerings
of the SAME scale that go up and down the fretboard. It's the same notes, just
different ways of playing it due to the way the guitar is set up.

For instance, the pentatonic maj/minor has 5 notes. There are 5 common finger
positions that are most often used. These 5, taken together, will cover the entire
fretboard with the same scale.

The major (diatonic) scale has 7 notes. Using the CAGED method there are 5
finger positions that will cover the entire fretboard. Also, there is the 3-note-per-
string method which has 7 positions and is the preferred fingering method
used by many (myself included).
#14
im sorry but whats caged? is there any lessons on this stuff on this site?
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#16
Quote by edg
Hm, you definitely need some scale help.

First of all, the pentatonic is a scale and so is the major, minor, etc... They ALL have
different notes. However, like the pentatonic positions which can be shifted to
change key, every other scale has finger positions as well which can also be
shifted to change key. The all work alike.

If your book shows different ways to play the same scale for each key, I'm
guessing it's because it's showing you one position on the fretboard.

For instance, I could play a C major scale starting at the 8th fret using one of
the finger positions (or "boxes") and if I wanted to play it in G I'd slide it down
to the 3rd fret and play the same thing there.

so what finger positions or boxes should i learn?
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#17
Quote by Mental Militia
so what finger positions or boxes should i learn?


Should or shouldn't is up to you.

But, ALL of them.

One isn't really more important than another. You could solo in just 1 position,
that's fine. But, when you know all of them, you have a map of the entire
fretboard which is important. Besides, this is very very early basic stuff. Just
a beginning to working with scales. It doesn't take that long to get comfortable
with them.
#18
What exactly is a key?( i heart everyone say it but I don't get 100% what it is) does it have anything to do with the root note? and is it possible to switch scales while staying in the same key?
#19
A key is the base diatonic scale a song is in. If you look at a piece of music you
see #'s and b's at the left side of the bar line. That indicates the sharps and/or
flats which tells you the key.

So, yeah, the key is related to the root note. However, songs can and often do
change key. So it's more of an overall suggestion than anything else. But, you
need to pay attention to it as it informs you how to interpret the music.

When improvising you can use many different scales. You don't have to stick
with just one. But that will usually take some skill to do well.
#20
Quote by Ghost Shadow
I would say, C-A-G-E-D


Yes schitz is right, this has nothing to do with scales (well it does, since chords are build out of scales but **** that for now ) it's a tool to use for Chords.

And threadstarter, Major all over the neck, Blues, Chromatics, Harmonic Minor and Bepop scale. And you have to know when/how you can use them as well, that's a bigger challenge them actually learning them

#21
learn the modes of the major scale, so ionian,dorian,phrygian,lydian,mixolidian,aeolian (natural minor), and locrian...you should be able to find a lesson somewhere on the internet
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#23
Quote by marvelboy_04
i dont know all that youre talking about. is there any lessons on this site for this stuff? and ive always wanted to know. when you see scales on a page its in one position.but solos are played all over the fretboard.how do you know where else to play and how do you transfer from one position to another?

It sounds like you might be confused as to what a scale actually is.

Disclaimer: My theory knowledge is limited to basic theory, so while I think I know it pretty well, some of the smarter people on this site feel free to correct me.

For this explanation I will be talking about 8 note scales (major, minor, etc) and not pentatonic scales.

A scale is basically the 8 notes in a key. For example, the C Major scale is - C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. These 8 notes compose the 8 naturally occuring notes in the key of C major.

That said, it is important to realize that scales are not limited to positions. The low E, the octave E, and the octave E on top of that are all part of the C major scale. All 8 of these notes in any position on the neck are, for all intents and purposes, part of the C major scale (not getting into intervals).

I have a method of practicing scales that can help get you into this mindset. I'm going to post it when I get the time, which is not right now.

Anyways, just think of scales as everywhere, all over the neck. Nothing to do with positions.

Again, correct me if I'm wrong.
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#24
That's correct.

A finger position is just a way of fingering a scale in that area of the fretboard.
The scale goes up and down the entire fretboard. Think of a finger position
as a "window" into the scale at that area of the fretboard. This "window" can
slide up & down the neck. Each "window" will have a different scale fingering
until you start repeating at the octave.