#1
Can someone please explain to me exactaly what harmonics and pinch harmonics are. I've read about them in "Riffer Maddness" but the description is not very detailed.
#3
thanks but that doesn't tell me what a natural harmonic is.
#4
Lay your finger across the strings (don't push them down, just lightly touch them)

Now play a note.

That's a natural harmonic
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#5
isnt that basically muting the string?

and I'm trying to learn this to play some pantera songs.
Last edited by Krion at May 24, 2006,
#6
No, by only touching it lightly you don't stop the string vibrating, but instead make it vibrate in two halves (See crappy picture, top one's normal, bottom one's Natural harmonic at 12th fret)

I believe Pantera uses Pinch Harmonics mainly (they'll sound 'squealy'). They're more complicated to explain.

Basically, you pick the string twice at the same time, with the pick, and wth your thumb.
I personally didn't find any lessons or anything helpful at all, ut found that practice was the only solution.

Depending on where you pick the string, a pinch harmonic sounds different. It's really just a mix of the normal note, and natural harmonics, and where you pick varies the amount of normal note, and the amount of harmonics.

Hope this helps

EDIT: sorry, in that above post, I should of said "lay your...at the 12th fret"
Natural Harmonics are easiest at the 12th, 7th, and 5th frets (where you divide the string into halves, thirds and quarters) but are possible almost everywhere.
Attachments:
harm.JPG
Populus vult decipi. Decipiatur.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
It's can be a contraction and genitive case.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
If you cut down on these costs students won't learn so well, effecting the "quality"...
Last edited by frenchyfungus at May 24, 2006,
#7
With pinch harmonics, take your thumb and slide it to the edge of your pick, then with a note fretted, pluck the note. It should sound like a natural harmonic. To make it squealy, simply vibrato the string your fretting. As frenchyfungus said, you can find different sounds for the pinch harmonic playing along the pick-ups.
#8
natural harmonics- 5th, 7th, 12th, 19th, and 24th frets only.
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#9
If you need help with pinch harmonics watch PickNGrin's video on it.
It really helped me alot.
#10
natural harmonics are pretty simple, just lay your finger on the string like they mentioned, pinch harmonics were such a bitch for me but once you get them you "get" them and can pull them off easy. Just mess around with the way you hold your pick, and pickngrins video is REALLY alot of help!
#11
Sorry, that's wrong tubab0y

You can get Natural harmonics relatively easily at the 4th, 9th, 16th and 21st frets.

As well as the one between the 2nd and 3rd fret.
Populus vult decipi. Decipiatur.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
It's can be a contraction and genitive case.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
If you cut down on these costs students won't learn so well, effecting the "quality"...
#12
Actually, harmonics can be sounded out all over the neck. They do, however, sound out better at certain positions.
Last edited by Rock 24/7 at May 29, 2006,
#13
Quote by gsr2k6
once you get them you "get" them and can pull them off easy.



thats pretty true.

try fretting the 12th fret, preferrably on your low e string
and pick halfway between the 12th fret and your bridge.

the way you pick is kind of tricky to explain and not everyone does it *exactly* the same, so thats why there are 5 billion explanations.

typically you hold the pick with less of the pick sticking out.

the motion is like you are swooping where you go down and back up as well as pick, there is kind of a circular movement thing, think 'needle and fabric' thing.

hope that could clear something up.
Last edited by boardsofcanada at May 29, 2006,