#1
band and i are starting to learn theory. so we took one of our songs and figured out what the notes that we play.

goes like this

E F# G A B C D e

in attempt to find what key it i got a bit lost.

First i thought it was G major
then i thought it was E minor

both those keys have the same notes.
whats the difference?? what key are we playing in?

thanks in advance everyone.

tyler
#2
That depends on the what notes/chords you play the most and where you play them. If you have a fair amount of G chords then it is like G major, but if you have a lot of E minor chords then it is likely E minor.
#3
ok they have the same notes that's right :P

you may have noticed already that most songs end on their root note (root note is a G when it's in G Major and an E when it's in E Minor, in case you don't know yet). That last note makes the song sound "home". That last note is the key it is in.

If your song doesn't end on that particular chord or note that makes it sound "home", then play that chord after it. You'll just feel whether it should be a G or an E. Well that note you end on is the key you're playing in.
#4
Modes of the Major Scale

First of all, a mode is a scale derived from a different scale. The basis behind deriving modes is making a note that is not the tonic your new root note! There are 7 basic modes derived from the major scale. If you don't know the major scale, learn it ASAP. The intervals are W W H W W W H.

Anyways, since there are 7 notes in the major scale, you can have 7 different root notes (or starting points) and still be in the same key. For the purpose of this lesson I'll be using the key of C, because it has no flats and no sharps, and is one of the most common keys.
Here's a diagram to help with the concept:

Key of Cmaj: C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F?
[b]C[/b] Ionian     [b]C[/b] D E F G A B [b]C[/b]
[b]D[/b] Dorian       [b]D[/b] E F G A B C [b]D[/b]
[b]E[/b] Phrygian       [b]E[/b] F G A B C D [b]E[/b]
[b]F[/b] Lydian           [b]F[/b] G A B C D E [b]F[/b]
[b]G[/b] Mixolydian         [b]G[/b] A B C D E F [b]G[/b]
[b]A[/b] Aeolian              [b]A[/b] B C D E F G [b]A[/b]
[b]B[/b] Locrian                [b]B[/b] C D E F G A [b]B[/b]
[b]Bold[/b] notes are root notes of each scale.


First of all, start thinking of notes as scale degrees:

  Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1


The names of the modes, in order, are Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian, and they start on their respective scale degrees.

Starting on the first degree, you get 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1, which is Ionian. Also the major scale.

Starting on the second degree, your notes are D E F G A B C D. This is the Dorian mode. Its formula is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1. Here's why:


 Degrees: 1 2 3  4 5 6 7  1
 D scale: D E F# G A B C# D

D Dorian: D E F  G A B C  D
 Degrees: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1


You should be able to see how the F# was flatted down to F natural and C# down to C natural. That is how each mode's formula is found.

The third mode is Phrygian, its formula is 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1. In the key of C, the notes would be E F G A B C D E = E Phrygian.

The fourth is Lydian. Formula is 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1.

5th is Mixolydian, 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1.

6th is Aeolian, or the natural minor scale. 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1.

7th is Locrian, which is a half diminished scale. 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1.

These formulas are intervals in relation to the major scale. The major scale is used as a reference for just about everything, and modes are no exception.

Therefore, the 7 modes in the key of C are:
C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian
B Locrian
#5
By the looks of it, it's in E minor. E minor is the harmonic minor of G and therefore it has the same notes. For G, it goes G A B C D E F# G. The sixth note in the scale is the harmonic minor so Em is harmonic of G. The same for any other scale. Take the key of C. C D E F G A B C. Am is the harmonic minor of C. It works for all major scales. Both C and Am have the same notes in it so they will sound the same.
Ohhh...My head hurts...


Quote by Inahrima
^ have i told you i keep misreading your title as UG's biggest bad greek?
#6
ok those both make sence.

so taking in the second response
im pretty sure the "ending note" is a B

so from there i have to find the scale with B as the root and with the following notes

B C D E F# G A

is that correct?
how do i go about figuring out what variation of B that is (major/minor)
thank you everyone for your help
#7
Quote by tylersch

how do i go about figuring out what variation of B that is (major/minor)
thank you everyone for your help
Learn the scale degrees of the modes!
#8
Well, then you're song is probably in G, not B. In the key of B, the notes C, D, and A are all sharp, so if only the F is sharp, then the song is in either G or Em.
Ohhh...My head hurts...


Quote by Inahrima
^ have i told you i keep misreading your title as UG's biggest bad greek?
#9
Quote by beatles_rock09
Well, then you're song is probably in G, not B. In the key of B, the notes C, D, and A are all sharp, so if only the F is sharp, then the song is in either G or Em.
He meant B as the tonic, not the key of B major.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Do you get this stuff now?


yes, to a point. you guys helped alot.


thank you

and i think it is Em, becuz it does have bit of a darker/sadder minor sound to it
#13
E Minor is the relative minor to the key of G Major
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#14
Quote by beatles_rock09
By the looks of it, it's in E minor. E minor is the harmonic minor of G.


E minor is the relitive minor of G major. E harmonic minor is the relative harmonic minor of g major.
#15
Quote by Shorrock
E minor is the relitive minor of G major. E harm"onic minor is the relative harmonic minor of g major.
I'm pretty sure that relative harmonic minor" isn't a technical term.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I'm pretty sure that relative harmonic minor" isn't a technical term.


I think it gets the point across. E minor isn't a harmonic minor either way.
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