#1
I have a few questions for all you virtuosos out there who can actually shred, how long did it take you to actually play scales at a mind boggling speed, also what helped you to be able to do so and (other than the lesson posted on ug ) where can i find specific lessons to help me do so, i greatly appreciate any help
~Ineptus Domi Paradisus~
"You can choose a ready guide in some celestial voice.
If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.
You can choose from phantom fears and kindness that can kill;
I will choose a path that's clear
I will choose freewill."
#3
If playing scales fast is what you're trying to do, and you focus almost completely on that task, then it can be accomplished in a few months with an hour per day of practice with a metronome. But that's hardly virtuosity...it's only one of many steps along the way.

If you're new to working on technique, then you'll want to establish a good foundation both in your technique itself and your approach to practicing.

http://www.guitarprinciples.com/

http://www.music44.com/X/&unism=4&unisk=699323-H2&AffID=1001


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Last edited by RTB_Chris at May 25, 2006,
#4
Much thanx i guess i just keep practicing
"You can choose a ready guide in some celestial voice.
If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice.
You can choose from phantom fears and kindness that can kill;
I will choose a path that's clear
I will choose freewill."
#5
you might get more responses if you deleted this threads and posted it in the shred forum
Quote by Soma3009
I came up with this kick ass riff on my ukelele when I was 12. Find out two years later, it was smoke on the water. Got my hopes and dreams killed..



Quote by saintjimmy99
you used the right form of "their!" i commend you sir!

#6
Work on general technique like sweep picking and legato and you can use these to play faster whilst you work on your picking speed when practicing scales.

It doesn't matter how long it took everyone else - it'll take you longer/shorter than them, just keep going - you'll get there.
Last edited by Sir Edwin CBE at May 27, 2006,
#7
i thought this was about "art of shredding" by pantera.....

anyway, if you want to be a virtuoso. you really need to have discipline. and basically practice practice practice.
one should not feel threatened by opinions contrary to his own
#8
I once practiced the major scale "box" shapes across all the strings and up the neck for about 3 hours when i was watchin tv once.
I just laid on the sofa and played it over and over again. Sad, yes, but it worked.
Been away, am back
#9
well shreding isnt always playing fast my friend but if you do to play at BLAZING SPEED then try a lot of finger exerscises and what i did was focus on one part of a song that i liked it happened to be trilogy suite op. 5 and i played the first part slow until i could play every not right but not at the same speed and if you parctice enough the speed will come naturally (or it did for me) -nick
#10
Basically just practise every minute of free time you have, when your watching tv run through scales and chromatics. metranome. Practise standing up as well as sitting down.

When you learn a new lick or scale pattern etc. Do it really slowly at the start and work out the fingering that works for you. Sometimes all that can be stopping you from performing a lick correctly at the correct speed can be the way you are fingering it.

A desire to want to practise all the time and get better. If it in any way bores you to sit for 10 hours a day doing scales then your not meant to be that fast. Not sure if that is helpfull :s
#12
^awesome thread, read the WHOLE thing
"you hear people say, I don't care if people are black, white, green or purple. Ah come on now, green or purple? you've got to draw the line somewere" - Mitch Headburg.
#13
Yeah, "the ole speed building in 21 days" thread. It's actually decent advice for
the most part, but it really doesn't get to the heart of the matter. Plus, I believe
if you actually go through all that but your technique is full of bad form and
tension, you will be ingraing that into your practice and STILL won't be able
to play fast.

The one thing that helped me break my speed barrier, was learning how to
practice. That's it in a nutshell. PART of that is playing slowly. But the OTHER
part is playing PERFECTLY. Which is to say being aware of all movements and
focusing your attention on what you're doing so that every movement is efficient
and relaxed.
#14
I started by slowly picking with up and down strokes and built up speed slowly until I was quickly tremelo picking through the scale.

I'm not sure how good of advice that is though...
TO DISTURB IS TO PLEASE