#1
Hi
Could you just give your thoughts and information about the playing style of Ritchie Blackmore? How he got his sound? What techniques he used, etc.?

And i hav 2 specific questions about his playing:
1. I notice in the songs of his latest band "Blackmore's Night", during his electric guitar solos, when he does a vibrato, the sound gradually "opens up", almost as if he's using a wah effect 2 do it, but it doesn't sound totally like wah. Maybe it was in his earlier playig 2, i just dont know. So how does he do it?

2. In his Blacmore's Night song "Wish You Were Here", at one point he plays a small lick which sounds smooth w.r.t the other licks. I mean it sounds less bright and has almost no dynamics. How can that be done? I've tabbed out that lick here:

e--------------------------------------------------
b---------------8~~~---------------------------
g----------7h9-----------------------------------
d----/7h9----------------------------------------
a--------------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------

Thanx

EDIT: Added a slide to the first note in the tab, which i had 4gotten.
Last edited by apakhira at May 26, 2006,
#2
1. I can't think of anything else but exponential vibrato... Start narrow, then gradually gets wider, resulting in the sound "opening" op.

2. Can you give me the exact time? I can't be arsed to listen to the whole song hoping to hear it.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#3
Quote by apakhira

And i hav 2 specific questions about his playing:
1. I notice in the songs of his latest band "Blackmore's Night", during his electric guitar solos, when he does a vibrato, the sound gradually "opens up", almost as if he's using a wah effect 2 do it, but it doesn't sound totally like wah. Maybe it was in his earlier playig 2, i just dont know. So how does he do it?



I don't know exactly what you are talking about, but it could be tone-pot wah, which sounds almost like regular wah.
#4
OK.
For my 2nd question the part of Wish You Were Here i am talking about is from 1:24-1:27, just after Candice sings "I miss everything about you".

And for my 1st question, i just found out he does the opposite too: Dark->Bright as well as Bright-->Dark. A vibrato in which a bright tone dims up can be found a number of times in the solo of "Street of Dreams" (Any of the Blackmore's Night versions), particularly look 4 it at 2:30.
A slight variation of this effect, in which the vibrato alternates between dark and bright, is in the solo of "Gone With The Wind" (again Blackmore's Night). And asomewhere down in the solo, u wud hear the Dark-->Bright vibrato. But the effect in the Street of Dreams solo is more pronounced.
Last edited by apakhira at May 26, 2006,
#5
Hey, guys. Please help. I just loove these sounds and i wanna play like Ritchie
#6
Quote by apakhira
Hey, guys. Please help. I just loove these sounds and i wanna play like Ritchie


Have you tried the tone-pot wah?
#7
Quote by mr_hankey
Have you tried the tone-pot wah?

By tone-pot wah, do u mean 2 use the tone control of the guitar 2 change the tone?
#9
OK. I tried that pot wah u all talked about. Didn't seem 2 affect the tone that much. I mean it does affect the tone when its clean, but when a little distortion is added, the effect goes away. Maybe my tone pot isn't that good. But i think its a hand technique somehow. But i maybe wrong. If u guys hav any of the songs i mentioned, u could listen and tell me.

Thanx
#10
to my knowledge Blackmore keeps tone at 10 all the time, it doesnt seem likely he would play with them, he changes pickup selection a hell of a lot but ive never seen him touch the tone controls. I am more familar with his style through Rainbow and I do like BN. sorry. I could say what I think you mean but I will ask first. Change your pots anyway, it will sound heaps better and its a cheap mod.
I'm gonna live forever and if I don't suceed i'll die trying.
Originally posted by Liberation
Damn. You win Master Shake. I am not worthy!
Last edited by Master Shake at May 28, 2006,
#11
Yeah. Like i got my friends guitar and it didn't help.I figured that since distortion introduces pper harmonics, even if the tone control reduced HP in the signal, they wud b created by the distortion. And I was checking put my tone pot. I always had a problem that the tone wud start changing more towards the end of the whole range. Shpuld these pots be Linear or logarithmic? And what shud b the capacitance of the tone capacitor. The pickup assembly, with tone control and all was installed by a local guitar shop on my acoustic guitar. So i need 2 know this coz he may hav done something wrong (soorry 4 the off-topic question).

So anyway, guys, did you think about any other ways he could've done that?
#13
http://www.rockinger.com/index.html?lang=ENG
Type the numbers in search
07001 (3x for Tone and Volume)
07049 (2x for Tone)
07009 (1x for Volume)

thats what I have installed pretty much, my pots are actually DiMarzio though. I tried to go as expensive as I could but see your local guitar shop and they should (if they are decent) have what you are looking for. I remain brief because I'm really tired.
More info
Here

Other Blackmore specks if you were interested but this is all really common knowledge:

Currently uses Fender Gold Lace Sensor Pickups

Doesnt use the Middle pickup and is usually disconneted or removed (thats why its not on his signature strat)

Uses ENGL amps, his signature amp is sweet as but also very hard to get if you dont live in Germany

always used a scalloped neck but not needed in BN (different style of music)

Uses about 10 gauge strings I think

Doesnt barre his chords

uses his thumb a lot

I think im just going stupid now but there is some info for you
I dont think anyone is 100% sure on what he does and he constantly changes things so I cant really help much more on what you asked but ask other things and I can try to answer
I'm gonna live forever and if I don't suceed i'll die trying.
Originally posted by Liberation
Damn. You win Master Shake. I am not worthy!
Last edited by Master Shake at May 28, 2006,
#14
U'd be surpeised-- i didn't know the last 2. Do u mean he uses his thumb 4 the chords or 4 other things 2?
Actually, i'm just rediscovering Blackmore. I first heard Deep Purple wen i was a kid, and i didn't like them coz they were so loud. Haven't listened 2 Blackmore ever since, until now. Believe me, there was a time wen i thought PF's Dark Side of the Moon was crap, and now Pink Floyd is my favorite band.

So he does use pedal licks, u mean wah pedal licks?

And by wanting info about Blackmore, i also wanted 2 know what kinda scales he uses (looks 2 me harmonic minor and its modes), picking styles, etc. I just love his super-legato lines he plays in BN.
#16
okay as I said i am more familar with his 70's era so I assume he would still do some of it to some extent.
Thumb usage is both chords (cover top strings for say Bm) and single notes (stormbringer) he uses it in heaps of riffs even later versions of Smoke on the water.
He doesnt use effects much and certainly not a wah pedal, used a bass pedal occasionaly and a few others but not much at all to my knowledge.
It was Ritchie who first injected rock guitar with the classical scales and chord progressions that inspired future legions of rock guitarists. He also brought medieval, baroque influences to his music. These influences particularly color Ritchie's terrific melodic sense.Blues influence. Added to the classical influence is a strong and very unique blues sense that sets him apart from a pure Neo-Classical style.Brilliant improvisationalist. Unique, original, instantly-recognizable lead style.
Ritchie's rhythm style is very sparse and part of what makes him sound unique. Instead of a traditional, chordal, rhythm guitar part, Ritchie frequently plays single notes that mimic the bass line ? for example, a root-octave figure, or a root-5th-octave figure. In these cases, he frequently employs ascending and descending chromatic turnarounds at the end of a verse.

You won't ever hear the standard root 6 bar chord out of Ritchie, you'll hear a root 1 instead, and occasionally two-note 5th power chords. This approach would sound extremely thin if Ritchie didn't always have a keyboard player in the band to thicken up the sound.

Other rhythmical stuff includes the use of pedal points and arpeggiated triads over a classical chord progression. These are techniques Ritchie borrowed from Bach. But what Ritchie is most famous for is songs based on two-note 4th-based riffs ? the kind used in Smoke on the Water, Burn, Man on the Silver Mountain, and Kill the King.

Ritchie's staccato lead style is perhaps the most distinctive and recognizable element of his playing. He's often quite heavy-handed, but is also capable of being beautifully delicate. Ritchie moves between the fast and flashy, and the slow and melodic with magnificent grace and ease. He's an alternate picker on speed runs but also uses a lot of legato and open string pulloffs too. Ritchie was also one of the first players to employ sweep picking; usually in the form of quick, muted, raked arpeggios. He does a fair amount of finger picking with his thumb and index finger.He alternate picks so its always up and down like Highway Star is that quick technique.Classical influence. Ritchie brought Bach to Rock.

Scale wise, Ritchie's licks often mix the Blues scale the with the Dorian and chromatics. He was the first rock player to make extensive use of Aeolian minor, and he sometimes throws in some Middle Eastern flavored licks from what has become known as Blackmore's snake-charmer scale (a variation of the Hungarian Minor). Also Antaloenian (spelling its way to late) sort of half turkish scale in the classic stargazer and hear it in full in Gates of Babylon He uses modes a lot, particulary in early Rainbow but also F# and Dm. He said E is boring. doesn't do too much in C; it's a little too obvious, too bright. G is a very resonant key, F# is more of a blues. Dm gives you the entire length of the neck to do nice open notes.(his words.)

plays quite a bit of slide and uses it quite effectively to enhance his melodies.

Vibrato:

He's got a few. A medium speed, medium width one, and a faster frantic, heavy-handed one. He also has a rather heavy-handed Hendrix-like whammy bar technique that he uses more in the live setting as a flash effect rather than as an integrated part of his playing style.

yeah that might not make much sense but im way to tired and most of that is from some other web, not so much BN but just try reading some BN interviews wich shouldnt be hard to find, he sometimes talks about styles which would obviously be influeced a lot from renaisonce music
I'm gonna live forever and if I don't suceed i'll die trying.
Originally posted by Liberation
Damn. You win Master Shake. I am not worthy!
#17
Hey thanx. bt i jus read that snake charmer scale is the 5th mode of Harm minor. Well, anyway, i hav attached, the solo of "Street of Dreams", which has the vibrato tone changes i was talking about, and a part from "Wich U Were Here", which hasthat lick i tabbed out. Pls listen, and tell me if u understand, how they're done.
They're small mono MP3s, renamed 2 .zip.
Attachments:
Wish u were here part.zip
Last edited by apakhira at Jun 2, 2006,