#1
heya. this summer im planning on recording an ep of my own material. id like to play everything on it, i just find the idea so free. i cant play drums at all tho. my m8 can.
any ideas how i could record this way? i.e, me playing guitar, drums, other instruments, with a m8 playing drums?
i need to get a better signature.
#2
Well I'm assuming you were gonna multi track. Just mic up the drums to the mixer and that should be it. You need to be a bit more specific.
#4
lol yeah multi-track

actually my question is more about when the drums should be recorded. ie, should the drummer record alongside me playing the bass track, or should the drums record separately to the stuff im gonna do, etc
i need to get a better signature.
#6
you can record the drums with you playing bass along aide but have the bas DI and only put it through the head phones with the click then your drummer has something to go along too and the bass wont get picked up on the mics
#7
Use a few mics for the drums, one in or near the bass drum, if u can, then u shud have two mics, on either side, over the hi-hat on one side and the ride on the other (i think there on opposit sides. Also, use multi-track like the other guys said to record the drums and guitar. i study music tech but i'm no expert
#8
Quote by imagonaeatu
you can record the drums with you playing bass along aide but have the bas DI and only put it through the head phones with the click then your drummer has something to go along too and the bass wont get picked up on the mics


wouldnt the bass get picked up at least a little?
i need to get a better signature.
#10
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
wouldnt the bass get picked up at least a little?


if you're running it directly into the mixer via DI box (or if you have active electronics on the bass) theres no amp at all so no noise from the bass that'd be picked up (unless you're playing bass right next to the snare drum mic...which you're probably not)


As far as recording drums goes:
its advised you get at least 3 or 4 mics for a decent quality recorind
-1 mic on the snare (the Shure SM57 everybody loves)
-1 mic on the bass drum (another form of dynamic mic)
-1 or 2 mics as overheads (some kind of condensor mics)

you can mess with different positionings to get different sounds.
#11
yeah im cool with the recording equipment. my main concern is which order the instruments should be recorded. wotever the order is will affect wot the musicians will hear on the headphones while they're playing.
i need to get a better signature.
#12
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
yeah im cool with the recording equipment. my main concern is which order the instruments should be recorded. wotever the order is will affect wot the musicians will hear on the headphones while they're playing.


1. Workout the order of the song so you know exactly how many bars you need for verse/chorus/fill/solo
2. Setup a click track
3. Take whoever's got the best sense of rythm first (drummer, bassist or even rythm guitarist)
4. Generally just build up the rythm instruments and then add in vocals and lead guitars last
#13
I personally like to record as much live as possible. At least bass, guitar and drums. And to be honest, you shouldn't be too worried if you get some spill from other instruments unless it is taking over from what you want mic'd.
#14
^Fleaflciker really has the trick.

Having been in several recording sessions with my own band and having "researched" this topic for a project in school, I found that all producers and engineers agree that "the more live, the better." The best bands have the best recordings because they do as much live as possible. As David Gilmour says, the art of the performance has been lost, because the recordings are pieced together and not really played by the band at all. Recordings should BE a performance.

Now, of course, sometimes it's best to just do drums and bass then everything else. It just works out that way... but PLEASE, don't get into your head that there is a SINGLE method of recording. One is no better than the other, it's just that they each have their places.

It's like asking, "What's better... phrygian or locrian?" Obviously neither -- they each have their place.

And personally speaking, I think recording a single instrument to a ****ing click track is retarded. If you can't keep a steady beat ("steady" is usually interpreted by the audience as "perfect" --- 80% of your audience has untrained ears), you shouldn't be playing. Now I'm getting into personal opinion and semantics, so I'll stop there, but I think you all get my point.

The best thing to do: Think out each song, and think of the BEST possible way to do it. Can't play the electric guitar rhythm with the band because the acoustic guides the piece? Go acoustic first. Can do just bass and drums at once? Do it. Doesn't matter? Pick out of a hat.


red
Looking for my India/Django.