#1
Ive been playing for a while now, and ive been using some basic guitar method books, which coupled with 7 years of piano lessons, means that i have a fairly good grip on the basics. I have no issues reading standard notation, chords, some scales etc.

What Im really looking for is a book that is sort of going to teach me techniques, and some theory. Chord progressions, what works well together, basically, things that will help me write stuff on my own. Are there any sort of "advanced guitar" handbooks that will help me with this?
Quote by Macank
^^ strat? i want to get a stratocaster sound though!!


Fender Classic 60's Strat
Yamaha AES 720 (On the way!!!)
Ibanez GAX 30
Traynor YCV 40
Boss DS-1
EHX Big Muff
Ibanez Weeping Demon
Ibanez CF-7
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#2
I have a book that might be what you're looking for. I will find it tomorrow and post the necessary details.
#3
Mark Levine's The Jazz Theory Book perhaps? It's been recommended here quite a lot and I'm going to check it out soon! Need someone for verification about it being good though
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#4
I bought Jon Finn -= Advanced lead guitar improvisation recently


Haven't had a chance to look at it properly yet, but im assuming its good


Troy Stetina - SPeed mechanics is good for technique
#5
Quote by elvenkindje
Mark Levine's The Jazz Theory Book perhaps? It's been recommended here quite a lot and I'm going to check it out soon! Need someone for verification about it being good though


Yep, great book, and well suited for what the thread starter wants.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


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#6
The New Complete Guitarist, by Richard Chapman, is the book I have. It has techniques and theory, but there's also some stuff that probably isn't necessary like the history of guitar (I don't know whether you want that).

The book was given to me as a gift after I learned the basics, so it hasn't helped me out too much, but I think it might be close to what you want.
#7
I have a large guitar book library.

Without a doubt, the number ONE book every guitarist should have bar none
is: "Guitar Principles" (www.guitarprinciples.com). In that book is all the information
you need to learn HOW to practice so that everything else you practice is
made much better. It also has some of the very basic movements you need to
master to play well.

Second, "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar" has lots of great exercises isolating
the left and right hands and breaking down the things you need to do into small
chunks. It also has a decent chapter on "The Art of Practicing".

Those 2 are MUST HAVES In my opinion.

If you know your scales well, but are wondering what to do with them next,
"Sheets of Sound" is the next must have. This is really for intermediates and
above. This book has exercises that traverse scales in mindblowing diversity.
Superb traing for your fingers and scale knowledge.

Finally, "Shred Guitar". For the wannabe shred guitarist. This book goes through
10 different progressions, gives you licks to play over them, and does a scale
analysis of each lick. The second part of the book gives you pretty much all the
theory and scale fingering positions you need to do rock improv all in a nice
neat little nutshell. BUT, without decent progress on the first two books I
mentioned, you will struggle trying to play the licks as fast as the author.
#8
Quote by kyle_katarn3
...What Im really looking for is a book that is sort of going to teach me techniques, and some theory. Chord progressions, what works well together, basically, things that will help me write stuff on my own. Are there any sort of "advanced guitar" handbooks that will help me with this?
Check out Modern Chord Progressions by the late Ted Greene. In fact, anything by Ted Greene will take you far, far down the road.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
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#9
For all things chord-related, anything by Ted Greene (esp. Chord Chemistry, if you can find a copy) is hard to beat.

For technical stuff, I agree that Andreas' Guitar Principles is an excellent resource, and Stetina's Speed Mechanics is the standard in technical primers, though I can't in good conscience call it an 'advanced' book because it is anything BUT. I'm not knocking it (in fact, I recommend it often), but it's pretty basic.
#10
Wow, these are all great suggestions. I was expecting a bunch of stupid responses like "durr..check the lessons section" Im going to go to the store tmrw and take a look at as many of these titles as i can find. Thank you all so much, i really appreciate it.
Quote by Macank
^^ strat? i want to get a stratocaster sound though!!


Fender Classic 60's Strat
Yamaha AES 720 (On the way!!!)
Ibanez GAX 30
Traynor YCV 40
Boss DS-1
EHX Big Muff
Ibanez Weeping Demon
Ibanez CF-7
Ibanez DE-7
#11
Quote by RTB_Chris

For technical stuff, I agree that Andreas' Guitar Principles is an excellent resource, and Stetina's Speed Mechanics is the standard in technical primers, though I can't in good conscience call it an 'advanced' book because it is anything BUT. I'm not knocking it (in fact, I recommend it often), but it's pretty basic.


Well, That's why I consider them must haves. Not because it's advanced, but
because they're sound PRINCIPLES. I'm also very very sure that a majority of
those you find here, aren't practcing anything resembling sound principles.
As an observatiion, it looks like most people's practice goes from learning one
tab to another. Probabaly never even finishing one song and probably playing
them all badly. Advanced stuff will forever be beyond that type of practice.

I added "Sheets of Sound" as a more intermediate to advanced book. It won't
do you a lot of good unless you have sound scale and technical skills. Even
"Shred Gutar" will need more advanced skills. But it covers a number of
basic theoretical stuff for rock improv in a nice compact place with some examples.
It directly presents a bunch of licks -- "here ya go". So beginners will be open
to trying it. Then, they'll realize they aren't even close to having the technique to
play that stuff and will need to go even more basic.

Oh, also Guitar Principles and Sheets of Sound are only available from the
authors web sites....