#1
I don't know if this is a good place to put this, but, how should I go about lowering the action on my les paul?
#2
take off the strings. There are two ways. You can either adjust the truss rod at the top of the neck or play with the bridge by loosening the screws at the side of the saddle. That might sound confusing. Check to see if you have a manual to your guitar. Is it an epiphone or Gibson?
top axes:
Taylor GS8
Fender American Strat (w/DiMarzio pickups)
Epiphone Les Paul
#3
why take the strings off, you'd have to put them back on each time you adjust it to make sure you havent put it too low or not enough, basically turn the screws by the bridge just enough so its comfortable to play but you get no fret buzz on any of the frets, also check intonation as well after its adjusted to how you want it, btw it will be slightly out of tune after chaging the action
#4
Its a pain to do, ive tried it you almost have to take it to the music center
Gear:
1980 Gibson SG Standard Cherry Red
Ibanez TM-71 Talman Artcore Semi-Hollow
2003 Tom Delonge Fender Strat Seafoam Green
Traynor YCV40
#5
Quote by noah22791
take off the strings. There are two ways. You can either adjust the truss rod at the top of the neck or play with the bridge by loosening the screws at the side of the saddle. That might sound confusing. Check to see if you have a manual to your guitar. Is it an epiphone or Gibson?

Bad advice. You do NOT use your truss rod to adjust string height, per se. HOWEVER, truss adjustment is important to make sure your action is the lowest it can be (if that's your ultimate goal). Before lowering your strings, take a read on your neck relief. Capo your low E string on the first fret, then press down the low E around the 17-18th fret. Look at the gap between the top of the 8th fret and the bottom of the E string. The gap should be the size of a stack of a few sheets of paper, so there, but barely. If it's too much, then you should lessen the relief in the neck. If there's no gap, you need to add some bow. Then once you get past that, you lower your strings by using the screws on either side of the bridge. Do it in small increments, retuning as you go. Once you find a height that you like and that the strings don't buzz, intonate your guitar and you're set to go. And there's no reason you can't do any of those adjustments yourself. You're better off doing it. It'll make you more familiar with your instrument. Think of it as working on your own car v. letting someone else do it. If you have any specific questions, feel free to ask.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at May 29, 2006,
#6
Loosen the strings then turn the two wheels on the tune-o-matic bridge and tighten the strings again.
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