#1
How do you figure out what scale the song you are listening to is in?
What key it is in?
Simple question.
Im kinda listening to the notes and try to find em all which is really hard but i never know what key im in or scale.


Any help apreciated
#2
It is hard if you're inexperienced (I am, don't worry). Generally the first note or chord the song starts with is the key it's in. It's hard if your ear isn't trained very well, but I guess with practice you can get it down.
#3
Quote by Archaon
It is hard if you're inexperienced (I am, don't worry). Generally the first note or chord the song starts with is the key it's in. It's hard if your ear isn't trained very well, but I guess with practice you can get it down.


Thanks mate but dosn't songs change keys sometimes?
If the key change the scale dosnt change right?
So all i got to do is too train my ear to hear atleast the first note.
And isnt it true that sometimes the first note dosn't tell the key?
I've heard those things and i don't know if its true or not, i guess you know better.
#4
its easy even if you dont have much experience. just go to the low E string and pick from 1-12 and find wich note fits the best and thats usually the key.
#6
no, if the key changes, the scale willof course, change to match the new key.

btw, your right, the first note is sometimes NOT they key, so dont always go with that. picking the low e string up to the 11th fret usually works, if you have any ear at all.
another good way to tell, is the last note, or ore importantly the last chord played. if its an A minor chord, then thats your key.
#7
Ok I see.
But if i change scale and key i can still be able to play the melody?
Hows that possible when i cant choose the same notes from the first scale?
You know what i meen?
Example i play a melody in lets say C Major.
And then i ask you to play it in D# Minor, could you do that?
Im confused now

Anyways thanks!
#8
Yes, my band sometimes ajusts the key so that our singer is able to sing at a lower pitch
you just have to move down every note the same length so if a C = D# than E =F#
Changing the Minor into major... i dont think will work
#9
Quote by 4String_Maniac
Ok I see.
But if i change scale and key i can still be able to play the melody?
Hows that possible when i cant choose the same notes from the first scale?
You know what i meen?
Example i play a melody in lets say C Major.
And then i ask you to play it in D# Minor, could you do that?
Im confused now

Anyways thanks!

Yes you could play it, it would use different notes obviously... but the relation to the new root scale would remain the same.

Example: A simple melody in C could be C E F A. From the C major scale (C D E F G A B), we can see that this melody takes the intervals of 1 3 4 6... Now, we want to move that melody into another key. Let's use... oh... A major... A major = A B C# D E F# G#... so, 1 3 4 6 were our melody intervals, so in A major our melody is now A C# D F#.

Now, to anybody without perfect pitch (or even simple trained ears, for that matter), they wouldn't notice the difference (had it been at least a couple minutes before you play the next one) between the two melodies because the relation between the notes is kept, it's all the same.

Don't mistake this for changing chords... you can obviously change chords and still remain in the same key.

This subject is too broad to cover in a single reply. It spawns more topics than you would believe. Check out the UG Archives and other threads within Musician Talk to get more info.


red
Looking for my India/Django.
#10
Songs aren't in a set scale...

they're in set keys, and the scales played in the song would depend on the key, as there are multiple scales in a given key.

Just thought I'd clear that up.