#1
I've had a piece of **** $80 no-name "johnson" guitar for about 2 years. Every time I have attempted pinch harmonics, I get nothing. Even regular harmonics are kinda quiet on my guitar. I don't know if its the guitar itself or my technique, but I've spent a good year trying to get harmonics out of my guitar, and it's been nothing but failure. My amp is a Line 6 Spider II so I'm pretty sure the problem isn't the amp (I could be wrong though).

Should I just keep practicing on this one, or maybe buying a better guitar might solve this problem?
#3
Technique is more than likely a large factor here. It takes practice to really get pinches down.

Is the guitar single coil? If so, the low output makes pinches (and harmonics) much much less defined. Your technique then needs to be spot on to pull them off.

The poor build of the guitar is also a factor.
#4
Pickups with high output and strong midrange (where the overtones are) help in pinch harmonics. It's easier with more gain and treble. Turn the tone knob to 10. Humbuckers are better for harmonics, but probably cos they tend to have more output.

However, your technique matters too. If you're good, you can get harmonics even with a perfectly clean sound, or even on a (GASP!) acoustic guitar.
#5
Technique. You should be able to do pinchharmonics on every guitar you can get in your hands. Practice, practice, practice!
Gear
Gibson Les Paul Studio
London City Comet MK1
London City Spitfire II (Modded)
Squire Tele Custom (Modded)

Peavey Classic 30
Electro Harmonix Holy Grail Reverb
Line 6 Echo Park Delay
Visual Sound Jekyll and Hyde
Dunlop Crybaby Classic
#7
Slash and Billy Gibbons are big PH guys, they can execute them very well using low output pups.

It's 90% technique 10% in the hands
Ibanez -> Peavey -> Eardrums

Apparently I'm on some list of people to listen to..?
#8
^--- Agreed. I can get mad pinch harmonics off my classical guitar which is good for surprising people :P

On your electric try pinching around halfway between the first and last pickup and just after the neck pickup. Those are the ones I found easiest first. The other ones needed to be more presice with me.
#9
Thanks for the advice. I know it's possible to do harmonics on an acoustic but you can do pinch harmonics on it too???
#10
lol I can pinch harmonic on my acoustic [Takamine EF407] but on my electric [Aria Diamond] I hardly pull it of.... and on other guitars especially with humbuckers I can pull it off really easily... I have 2 P90's in my neck and mid, bridge is a Parksons MiniHumbucker I got for about 15$.
strat player forever.
#12
Quote by slayerbizkit
Thanks for the advice. I know it's possible to do harmonics on an acoustic but you can do pinch harmonics on it too???


yes.
#13
Quote by Air Guitarist!
im pretty sure its physically impossible to get PH's on nylon strings?^^

well of course I do it all the time on my Admira.
strat player forever.
#14
Here's what I did to become as good as Zakk Wylde at Pinch Harmonics...Keep Practicing them on an acoustic until you can do them fluently...then you will be a banshee..lol
Originally Posted by Teleprompters
people taking dumps in my guitar case
#15
Quote by Air Guitarist!
im pretty sure its physically impossible to get PH's on nylon strings?^^



Nope...it is entirely possible to get pinch harmonics on a nylon string. It's simple physics, really...the guitar is not the variable in the equation.
#17
it is the guitar,i have 3 and the harmonics are different on each one.
#18
can the bridge and tonewood affect this also?
Epiphone LP special II
-Duncan Designed pu's
Schecter c-1 Elite
-Neck:PAF Pro
-Bridge: Steve's Special
Boss MT-2 Metal Zone
Ibanez Weeping Demon wah
Peavey studio pro 112 65 watt
Ampeg 50 watt
#19
There's multiple factors to pinch harmonics.
1) Most importantly ; technique
2) Distortion/Tone
3) Pickups, how close they are to the strings. Further down means it's harder.
and more.
#20
I finally figured out how to do pinch harmonics lol, but is it normal for the harmonics to "move"? For instance, I have pick the string close to the second pickup to play a pinch harmonic on the 12th fret , but if I want to play a harmonic on the 1st fret I have to move my pick up close to the first pickup to get the harmonic to sound clear.

I hope my questions makes sense....
#21
Quote by slayerbizkit
I finally figured out how to do pinch harmonics lol, but is it normal for the harmonics to "move"? For instance, I have pick the string close to the second pickup to play a pinch harmonic on the 12th fret , but if I want to play a harmonic on the 1st fret I have to move my pick up close to the first pickup to get the harmonic to sound clear.

I hope my questions makes sense....



you will get a pretty similar sound if you dont move your pick hand at all. i found (i have the bridge pickup selected) that the closer you are the neck pickup the lower/flatter the pinch harmonic is and the closer you get to the bridge pickup the higher/sharper the sound is.
#23
^^dont know about that, but the pickups do make a difference. and i can always get louder harmonics and PHs in my neck pickup...
Quote by corduroyEW
Cheap amps are "that bad". They suck up your tone like cocaine at Kate Moss' party.


I am Michael!
#24
Quote by slayerbizkit
I finally figured out how to do pinch harmonics lol, but is it normal for the harmonics to "move"? For instance, I have pick the string close to the second pickup to play a pinch harmonic on the 12th fret , but if I want to play a harmonic on the 1st fret I have to move my pick up close to the first pickup to get the harmonic to sound clear.

I hope my questions makes sense....


Pinch harmonics, if you get deeply into them like Zakk Wylde or someone, are a science. It's definitely normal for them to "move," you can't get a good strong pinch harmonic on every fret by picking the same spot every time. Harmonics have "sweet spots," and pinches will only work if you're picking the sweet spot for whatever note you're fretting. Some sweet spots are closer to the bridge and some are closer to the neck, its just something you have to experiment with until you get the spots down to a science. Then your pinch harmonics will sound strong and rich no matter what note you're fretting.

good luck
Proud owner of a Gibby LP Custom and an all-original Vintage '62 Fender Jag

Quote by richwatkinson
Give 10 UGers a rope and ask them to pull. 4 will push, 1 will ask for buttsecks, 2 will tell you get an Ibanez and the last 3 will start complaining about Line6 Spiders.
#25
To add to my last post, ^^^^ there's a trick to finding the sweet spot for each fret. First just pick the note normally, then lightly tap the end of your index finger on the string of the note you picked. Keep doing this at different spots on the string and you will find the spot where the harmonic really sings. This is the note's sweet spot, where you would want to pick for a strong pinch harmonic.


good luck
Proud owner of a Gibby LP Custom and an all-original Vintage '62 Fender Jag

Quote by richwatkinson
Give 10 UGers a rope and ask them to pull. 4 will push, 1 will ask for buttsecks, 2 will tell you get an Ibanez and the last 3 will start complaining about Line6 Spiders.