#1
Thinking of getting one of these soon. Anyone played one? I'm pretty sure it's going to be pretty damn good because it's a USA Fender but does anyone have any horror stories about this thing?

#2
I suggest a '57 or '62. I own the '57 and with a few minor modifications it is awesome. It plays like a dream.
TRANSFIXUS SED NON MORTUUS
#3
I hate all the colors that it comes in.

And 1 pickup tends to kill your versatility.

Get a Jazz, or at least consider one before you buy.
Member of UG's Keyboardists club. PM 4string-tsurigi to join.

Jimbo Wallace of the Godlike, Archaic, But Sexy Instrument Players. PM me to join.
#4
The P-bass I recommend is a '62. It is a one-trick pony, but in the hands of a good bassist, it defines the bottom end. James Jamerson played a '62, and always plucked downwards with his first finger--even on the more challenging Motown material, like What's Going On or Bernadette. I own one, and I use it for the retro Motown originals I write. Play it with a pick, and you got the Beach Boys basstone (thanks to Brian Wilson and Carol Kaye). Play it more aggressively and you got the Sex Pistols bass tone. Run it through a few tasty effects and you got Roger Waters tone (bassist for Pink Floyd). It may be limiting with one pickup, but it sits nicely in the mix (live or studio), and will generally not overcrowd the 2.5 KHz spot where the kick drum slap resides. Get a good versatile amp with it, and you will love the tone. The Jazz bass is great for versatility and for its tone too--it depends on what sound you are looking for. If you like in-your-face aggressive punch, go for the Jazz. If you like big bottom with a little bounce in the tone--the P bass is for you.

There is also the PJ bass, but those generally do not resell at a nice value (in case you want to resell your bass). Best of both worlds. If anything, buy the American Fender if you can, or try to get a Made in Japan (generally, they have better craftsmanship) Fender.

By the way, Carvin makes a great J style bass--the neck is like butter, and you get more bang for the buck. Their pickups aren't the best, but you can always replace them with EMGs, Lindy Fralin, Bill Lawrence, Seymour Duncans, or other "high end" pickups. They are the best feeling basses with impeccable craftsmanship. But if you want a Fender, you gotta have a Fender--I totally understand the urge and the need for THE "sound". Which is why I own over 7 basses now...
#5
Quote by jaco de lucia
The Jazz bass is great for versatility and for its tone too--it depends on what sound you are looking for. If you like in-your-face aggressive punch, go for the Jazz. If you like big bottom with a little bounce in the tone--the P bass is for you. ...

Can't quite agree with you there, having owned a 1965 Fender Jazz (from new) and a Precision at the same time, I found them to be quite the opposite, the Jazz was always noted for its full bottom end and very little above 5th fret G string whereas the Precision always had much more mid and top end punch with far less bottom end than the Jazz hence its popularity with some heavy rock bassists.
My old Jazz actualy came alive at the top end (12th fret G string) when I fitted a J-Retro kit, numbers such as Life In The Fast Lane, Take It Easy and Born To Be Wild had feature parts played on the G string and up until then were lost on the Jazz but the J-Retro's parametric mid brought this out without losing the bottom end warmth.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#7
Well with the new S-1 switches in the latest American series basses, you can switch from a Precision sound to a Jazz sound. I haven't verified this myself having never played the new range.

Can anyone whose tried the new S-1 switching confirm how good it is?

I've played American Fender Precisions. I love them, and I do plan on getting one in the not too distant future (but probably won't be a gigging bass).

Check this out... I would if I had the cash!

http://www.basscentre.com/product_info.php?cPath=32&products_id=1125

It's like a sexy 40 year old woman, who seems too experience for you to handle, but yet so tempting.
#8
Quote by shut_up_you_***
Well with the new S-1 switches in the latest American series basses, you can switch from a Precision sound to a Jazz sound. I haven't verified this myself having never played the new range.

Can anyone whose tried the new S-1 switching confirm how good it is?

I've played American Fender Precisions. I love them, and I do plan on getting one in the not too distant future (but probably won't be a gigging bass).

Check this out... I would if I had the cash!

http://www.basscentre.com/product_info.php?cPath=32&products_id=1125

It's like a sexy 40 year old woman, who seems too experience for you to handle, but yet so tempting.


The S1 switch (at least on the P-bass, I haven't tried it on a strat or a tele or a jazz bass) just makes the sound a bit lighter. It's not Pbass -> Jbass, but it's Pbass -> a lighter treblierish Pbass
haha
#9
I have played the S-1 series Jazz and Precisions, and I have to say, the switching system works pretty well. You'll never get a proper P tone from a J, or a J from a P, but it's a damn good effort either way.

The S-1 Jazz is probably one of the most versatile basses I've ever played. It gets pretty close to the P sound, but with a little less thump and a bit more "grr". The Precision doesn't do as well a job at emulating the J sound, but you get a really nice tone out of it either way.

You WILL notice the difference when you switch, and I can see when it would come in useful.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#11
I already have a Jazz, two actually. Looking to get at least one precision to get some different sounds.