#1
so i understand that if you have a chord progression of lets say, Em C and D...then you would start a scale using any 3 of those chords and such....well what if your using powerchords...say your playing a powerchord of 3rd fret on the low E string, and 5th fret of the A string....which is a G and D....could you just solo off of either G and D scales?
#2
yeah, it's all the same thing basically...


as far as i understand...


but i don't really understand...
#3
a good question it takes some theroy to really understand but when soling traditionaly in rock you will play eitheir the rootnote like you said in the pnatonic or major whatever youd like or you can play on the 6th note which is always three frets down or four counting the one your on so like the 6th note of a is f# or you can just count up 9 a a#bcc#dd#ef(f#)
#4
well for power chords you need to take into consideration whether they are a major a minor note in the key. In this case, you could call this G major where G would be major and D would be major and you could solo in A minor, B minor, E minor, as well as C major in addition to D and G major. Or you could look at it a different way and say your playing in C major, where G would be a major, and D would be minor. theres many possibilities for each chords pattern as to what scale they are in

hope i didnt confuse you
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#5
Usually for powerchord, use the basic minor pentantonic or minor scale.
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#6
power chords are neither major nor minor since they contain no 3rd.

anyway ye use the maj or min pent scales, or even the blues scale (added #4). blues scale is used a lot in rock.
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#8
I would use a blues scale over any progression where the chords are power chords its just easier that. Then you can move the scale to suit the chord or you can just play in the one spot.
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#10
I'm so lost. I don't even kow where to start with a solo. HELP
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#12
Just learn your basic major and minor scale, minor pentatonic too. If you're stuck, just learn the minor penta and you can solo in every song that uses minor, but for songs that uses major keys, you can still use the minor penta and not the major penta, to achieve this simply use the relative minor of the major key. Know the roots.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
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#13
Take it slow. You need to know what key the chord progression is in. Then play your scale in the same key.

For power chords it is simple because, like antman said, they are neither major nor minor. So you can easily use Major, Minor or Minor Pentatonic scale.

For example if your chord progression is A5 D5 E5 then you are in the key of A. You can start soloing using the above mentioned scales starting at the 5th fret on the low E string.

Powerchords and their respective scale positions share the same root note. For key of A, for example, both the powerchord and the scale start at the 5th fret of the low E string. For key of G it's the 3rd fret. So you need to know the notes along the low E string.

The notes along the low E are as follows:

Open string: E
1st fret: F
2nd fret: F#
3rd: G
4th: G#
5th: A
6th: A#
7th: B
8th: C
9th: C#
10th: D
11th: D#
12the: E

and then the pattern continues and repeats as you enter the next octave:

13th: F
14th: F#
15th: G
etc.

American Stratocaster + Blues Junior

#14
what is A5 D5 and E5 in tab form? and how do you figure out what the name of a power chord is?
#15
i thik youd only be able to play in a G scale, becuase i think it goes of the root chord, but you could also play in a G scale but start on the D note.......
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#16
i think you need a guitar teacher mate haha even if your a good player i was stubborn too about getting one but i came around eventually or if ya cant afford one look around on the net and start learning the basics like what are chords made up of and then what notes are where and the different positions you can play at after you learn that is very valuable cause not only can you play guitar but it transfers to piano and everything else you dont want to end up some idiot guitar player that can only play power chords and do some solo.


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#17
A5 is:

A--7--
E--5--

Basically "E--5--" is your root note, A. And "A--7--" is its 5th note, E. Play the two notes together and you get an A5 power chord.

D5 is:

A--12--
E--10--

The root note D is at "E--10--". Its 5th note is easily located by moving two frets toward the bridge and one string down, giving you "A--12--"

The 5th note is always found by moving two frets toward the bridge and one string down from the root note.

So if the E5 root note E is located at "E--12--" can you find its 5th note to complete the power chord?

American Stratocaster + Blues Junior

Last edited by Armored Artist at Jun 1, 2006,
#19
i knew that its 5th is always two frets towards the bridge and a string over, i jsut didnt get what E5 and stuff meant, but thanks for explaining it