#1
The wood: 1/2" particle board, a few 2-by-2s
The speakers: Two Celestion Rocket 50s
Miscellaneous Equipment:
  • Front cover material
  • Cabinent Cover


Step 1: The Plans:

May 31st, 2006
I will post my drafts/blueprints in the next few days. Any tips or suggestions are welcome. I pose these questions to you guys:
  • What dimensions do you recommend?
    I decided on 21" H x 29" L x 11" D.
  • Should it be completely closed or should it have an open back?
    I decided on half open, half closed backing.
  • Where do I start?
    I think I am going to start off making the box itself first. I will probably make the front plate (the piece that actually holds the speakers) once the box is completed.


June 1st, 2006
Okay, I'm almost done with the blueprints. I have some things I need to work out with them, specifically speaker mounting measurements. I also have to add the places where 2x2s will be added. And then they will be posted! Should be posted by tonight.

June 2nd, 2006
I managed to come down with a 12 hour stomach flu after eating a ton of Japanese food. I feel better, but now I have a big graduation to go to tomorrow and we are leaving today. I'll try to finish up the plans at the hotel and post them by tonight... if not tonight, who knows when they'll be up. I'm working my hardest though.

June 3rd, 2006
Finally, the blueprints are done. You can see them at my website so click the link below. Its up to you to decide what kind of screws you are going to use. As long as they will go through the 1/2" thick board and into the 2x2s, you should be good. I am personally going to use 2" or 3" square headed screws. It's also up to you if you want to put a handle on it, castors, rubber corners, etc. Also note that the blueprints do not include measurements for the speaker cutout. Those will be coming ASAP:

2 x 12" Guitar Cabinet Plans

June 5th, 2006
I get to start cutting the wood this week! The cabinet should start taking shape soon. Pictures will be coming soon in the next few days. I will start working on the speaker mounting piece once the speakers arrive. I will also finish the blueprint for that at that time as well. At this point, I have these questions:

  • Does anyone know how to wire an ohm switch for the back of the cabinet?
  • If I want to be able to switch between 4, 8, and 16 ohms, what ohmage of speaker do I get?


July 8th 2006
Laziness set in and I quit working on the project, but I realized that I have about a month left to finish this before I have to go back to college. So, its time to get cracking! I finished up the final blueprints. All the measurements are available and you should have everything you need to follow along if you want to. Pictures are finally here!

Particle Board
2x4s that I am going to rip into 2x2s

Hopefully I will get to cutting this week! Updates as soons as possible!
--------------------------------------------------------------

More questions will arise as I continue building the cabinent.

Last edited by jndietz at Jul 8, 2006,
#2
1. Depends on the size of the speakers.
2. Depends on the sounds you want. Do you want more bass response? Go closed. Do you want more mids and highs to shine? Go open. Want an equal balance? Go partial-open. Just a fully closed back with an elliptical cutout across the back so you can see the speakers.
3. Are you doing a 2x12 amp or cab? If an amp, I would start with the electronics, as those are more likely to take up more of your time.
#3
Quote by SuperAnalytical
1. Depends on the size of the speakers.
2. Depends on the sounds you want. Do you want more bass response? Go closed. Do you want more mids and highs to shine? Go open. Want an equal balance? Go partial-open. Just a fully closed back with an elliptical cutout across the back so you can see the speakers.
3. Are you doing a 2x12 amp or cab? If an amp, I would start with the electronics, as those are more likely to take up more of your time.


It is just going to be a cabinet. No electronics... as I already have a good head to use.
#4
This is a stupid question, but what kind of wiring is involved with just cabs? Do you just wire the speakers to an input jack or what? Are there any kind of diagrams you could post?

Thanks. (And cool project by the way,... looking forward to pics. )
#5
Quote by lostfuze
This is a stupid question, but what kind of wiring is involved with just cabs? Do you just wire the speakers to an input jack or what? Are there any kind of diagrams you could post?

Thanks. (And cool project by the way,... looking forward to pics. )


With cabinets, you wire the speakers in either series or parallel. Even with those two, I'm not sure of the differences between the two. That was a question that I was going to post once I get there. Anyways, yeah, you wire the speakers together and then wire something like this: to the speakers. Then drill a hole for it... and put it in. Plug your head in and good to go.

So, could someone explain the difference between series and parallel wiring? What are the differences?

Also, pictures will be coming tonight. Plans will be posted and pictures of the materials will be posted!

I still need recommendations on front grille cloth. I am thinking about going with tweed. I am going to go for that old fashioned look. I am going to stain the wood once its all done However, I am also now considering cover it with this:
Last edited by jndietz at Jun 1, 2006,
#6
When cutting the holes for the speaker, which of these is the diameter of the hole that I need to cut?

Diameter: 12.2", 309mm
Overall depth: 4.8", 122mm
Magnet structure diameter: 3.9", 100mm
Cut-out diameter: 11.1", 283mm
Mounting slot dimensions: 0.31", 7.9mm Ø
Number of mounting slots: 4
Mounting slot PCD: 11.7", 297mm
Unit weight: 4.4lb, 2.0kg

I am assuming cut out diameter, but I just need to make sure... because it sounds like it could be mounting slot PCD, too.
#7
ive never used a cab before but shouldn't there be a power supply at all? or does all the power needed come from the head being plugged in?

sorry if im wrong lol
#8
Quote by theusedsk8er
ive never used a cab before but shouldn't there be a power supply at all? or does all the power needed come from the head being plugged in?

sorry if im wrong lol


You got it right there

Plugging a guitar into a cabinet is useless unless there is a preamp/head. Combo amps just have the head and speaker(s) all built into one unit. Where as more powerful and customizeable rigs will have seperate speaker units (cabinets) and preamps (heads). But there are some combo amps out there that absolutely scream Fender Twin Reverb anyone?
Last edited by jndietz at Jun 1, 2006,
#9
You use serial or parallel wiring depending on the ohmage your amp requires.

i.e. if you amp runs at 8ohms then you can either;

use to 4ohms speakers in seris as the ohmages(resistances) add up

or use to 16ohm speakers in parallel as this halfs the resistance of them producing 8 ohms.


So basically whatever ohmage your head runs at you either need speakers double or half the ohmage.

Also one other option you may consider is that if you run a 100W 4 ohm amp into an 8ohm cab you'll only end up with about 65W coming out but this can be a good thing because it allows you to drive the amp hard at lower volumes.

This would basically do the same job as a Marshall power break. Some recording studios actually have speaker cabs that run at 32ohms as you can get 100W valve heads running at ful whack but they produce something like 1/4 or an 1/8 of the volume alowing better tone at lower volumes.
#10
sry off topic just trying to understand that ^ so the cabinets at 32 ohms are like that so you can have your head at full volume but it won't be so loud since your amps best tone is at full volume ?
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#11
Quote by RAGEING_BAD_@$$
sry off topic just trying to understand that ^ so the cabinets at 32 ohms are like that so you can have your head at full volume but it won't be so loud since your amps best tone is at full volume ?


Well its only true of valve amps as nearer maximum power you got power amp tube distortion which gives that fat creamy distortion sound. By putting the single into a cab with a higher ohmage the power has to do more work moving the speaker so less volume is produced,

So your understanding is correct. Your amp will be at full power giving you 'that' tone but at a lower volume.


For example my friend has a marshall JCM900 100W head and it can be switched between 4,8 and 16 ohms and his 1960A cab can run at 4 or 16. Live he matches the ohmages to get the full 100W but at home siwtches the head to 4 and the cab to 16 so he gets full power tone at 20-30W
#12
Quote by jndietz
You got it right there

Plugging a guitar into a cabinet is useless unless there is a preamp/head. Combo amps just have the head and speaker(s) all built into one unit. Where as more powerful and customizeable rigs will have seperate speaker units (cabinets) and preamps (heads). But there are some combo amps out there that absolutely scream Fender Twin Reverb anyone?



sorry about the whole off topic thing. ^ but thanks.

after reading what onelastshot said i suggest you should put one of those ohm switches so you can get full tone at home and at gigs.


good luck
#13
Quote by theusedsk8er
sorry about the whole off topic thing. ^ but thanks.

after reading what onelastshot said i suggest you should put one of those ohm switches so you can get full tone at home and at gigs.


good luck


Yep, I think thats the plan from here on out. Good thing he came in this thread and put in his 2 cents about ohmage, otherwise I would have just wired them up and called it good
#14
Quote by jndietz
Yep, I think thats the plan from here on out. Good thing he came in this thread and put in his 2 cents about ohmage, otherwise I would have just wired them up and called it good


Its never a problem if the ohmage is to high you jsut lose volume.

If the ohmage is to low i.e. 8ohm head into 4ohm cab you do temprarily double your output i.e. 100W will put out 200W howeve itll only be a matter of minutes before you overheat you amp fri the wiring pots and destroy the valves.
#16
I updated the original post with the link to the blueprints I put together.
#17
Updated the OP with some new info and two questions:

  • Does anyone know how to wire an ohm switch for the back of the cabinet?
  • If I want to be able to switch between 4, 8, and 16 ohms, what ohmage of speaker do I get?
Last edited by jndietz at Jun 5, 2006,
#19
Wish I could help man. I built my own cab a while ago and found these questions are best directed to the guys who work at the shops that sell this kinda gear.

I thought about making the cab with a ohmage switch but didn't deem it neccessary as it's only going to be used with one amp for it's life - Marshall TSL100.

When making the cab, don't just build it thinking of what you want, build it being realistic about how it's going to be used and what you want from that.

Hope that helped a little.

Can't wait to see the finished result. If you need any help on materials and how to put it together etc, I'm here.
peter

Last edited by GOD on the 7th day
#20
About time I finally updated! I'm hoping I actually get to cut something this week!
#21
Quote by OneLastShot
Well its only true of valve amps as nearer maximum power you got power amp tube distortion which gives that fat creamy distortion sound. By putting the single into a cab with a higher ohmage the power has to do more work moving the speaker so less volume is produced,

So your understanding is correct. Your amp will be at full power giving you 'that' tone but at a lower volume.


For example my friend has a marshall JCM900 100W head and it can be switched between 4,8 and 16 ohms and his 1960A cab can run at 4 or 16. Live he matches the ohmages to get the full 100W but at home siwtches the head to 4 and the cab to 16 so he gets full power tone at 20-30W



uhh guys you are ruining your tube amps by not matching the ohm rating on them, having a higher ohm rating makes all amps work harder but especially tube amps, it can do all sorts of crazy stuff to them, also ss amps (which amplify current) can blow if you use to low of an ohm rating, tube amps (voltage amplifyers) by useing v=ir what happens if the resistance goes down(they draw way more current(bad)) and also what happens if they have higher resistance (current goes down also bad). mismatching your ohm ratings is a bad idea use an attinuator to get sweet tube distortion at low volumes, that actually works and isnt bad for your amp. hope this helps some people.
~jacob
#22
^This guy doesn't really know what he's talking about.
SS amp's can't blow from not having a load. I know this from personal experience.

And also, most output transformers are somewhat flexible...
I have an attenuator, and sometimes I feed my 8 ohm head into 4 ohms, and 16 ohms with no damage done. The worst thing is if you hook up an impedence of 0 ohms, but most amps have a self shorting speaker out that will help prevent this to a certain degree.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#23
well, this is just what my electrical engineering, friend (hes 44) told me when i wanted to hook up my 10w @ 8ohms amp to a 2ohm 40w speaker, he told me that it puts too much stress on the output transformer ->too much draw.
#24
2 ohms is pushing it yeah, basically the closer you get to 0 ohms the harder it is on the OT. Going over the ohm rating isn't really that harmful, just less efficient.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.